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Capstone Projects

A Taste of Local Farmers' Markets

Sat, 12/09/2017 - 12:54
Abstract: This Capstone was based around presenting the produce and homemade products offered at the Saranac Lake and Lake Placid farmers markets. From classic green salads to fresh tomato sorbet's, the variety at a farmer's market is enough to peak any cooks interests.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
Authors: Thomas Moskal

A Taste of Japan

Sun, 12/10/2017 - 09:45
Abstract: Having traveled to Osaka Japan during the summer of 2017 I wanted to bring back what I had learned for everyone else to experience as well.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
Authors: DANIEL WIGINTON

A Taste of Dairy Free

Mon, 12/18/2017 - 15:19
Abstract: Culinary Arts Capstone, CUL462 Theme: Dairy Free. Chef Abt
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
Authors: Bethany Christman

A Study of Flat Breads from Around the World

Sat, 05/06/2017 - 02:20
Abstract: in my research I found the history and the techniques surrounding the production and ingestion of flat breads from around the world. This includes the production of foods from India to the plains of Ethiopia. Throughout my research i found the traditions and superstitions surrounding certain foods. inducing both my physical production of food and the traditional production of foods from throughout Africa to the Middle east. Flat Breads are a easy source of filling food, giving developing countries an easy means of nutrition in trying times.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Capstone Portfolio.docx
Authors: Patrick Pakulski

Ancient Grains

Sun, 05/07/2017 - 14:59
Abstract: A Taste of Ancient Grains Author: Josh Tallman Ancient Grains have been a staple in the diets of people around the world, but they hardly get recognition. The common person could most likely only name a couple grains that fall under the category of Ancient Grains. I researched the topic to get the back story to these grains. I created a four-course menu based off my finding on these grains and food that would pair well with them. I found that it was quite easy to incorporate these great grains into food that could be made daily with ease. I found through my dinner and my poster presentation that though people didn’t seem to know much about these grains, they enjoyed the food that they were incorporated into. Furthermore, they seemed to have more of an interest in using these grains at home after they saw the potential they had.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
Authors: Josh Tallman

Developing A Wildlife Teaching Collection

Wed, 12/06/2017 - 13:14
Abstract: Wildlife specimens hold significant scientific and educational value at Paul Smith’s College through the preservation of essential biological information. Specimens allow for the better understanding of the past and present conditions of a species, and are a valuable teaching tool for all-inclusive wildlife education. However important, it is apparent that the accumulation of wildlife specimens is insufficient due to a lack of education surrounding the preservation of specimens and methods pertaining to the development of a specimen collection. In response, the procedural framework surrounding standard specimen preparation practices was analyzed and adjusted in order meet the specific needs of the institution. A comprehensive procedural manual was created with the intention of making specimen preparation a more approachable task for interested students, as well as to ensure continual growth of the wildlife teaching collection at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2017
Authors: Jacob McCourt, Benjamin Wrazen

Comparison of Fine and Coarse Organic Matter Among Levels of Shoreline Impact: Implications for Ecological Restoration

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 15:24
Abstract: Human lake shoreline development has been shown to have impacts on the dynamics of the lakeshore. Such dynamics include the riparian and littoral zones interactions; the complexity, abundance, and residence time of large woody debris; organic matter/detritus, and food webs for fish, birds, and macroinvertebrates. Understanding such dynamics, and the impacts of human development, are important when attempting to restore the shoreline through the process of ecological restoration. The objectives of the study were, (1) to compare the amount of organic matter (smaller than sticks, branches, logs, and trees) among three levels of impact (impacted, minimally impacted, and benchmark), (2) to compare the amounts of CPOM and FPOM among the three levels of impact. The field data was collected using a modified design of sediment corer. A total of 63 samples were taken and the results clearly showed that the reference (benchmark) site had a much higher accumulation of organic sediment along the shoreline. Also, the data analysis also showed that there was virtually no measurable FPOM among the impacted and minimally impacted sites, but among the references sites it was more abundant than CPOM, which was opposite from the impacted and minimally impacted sites.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Final_Morrill.docx
Authors: John Morrill

A Comparison of Leaf Litter in the Aquatic, Terrestrial, and Transitional Zones among Impacted, Minimally Impacted, and Benchmark Conditions of the Shorelines of the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 17:55
Abstract: Human development of shorelines impacts structure and functionality of the shoreline’s ecosystems. Ecological restoration projects can be used to rectify this impact, but first data must be collected to determine the extent of impact human development has had on the shoreline. The objective of this study was to compare the biomass (wet and dry weights) of deciduous and coniferous leaf litter among impacted, minimally impacted, and benchmark shorelines and between terrestrial and aquatic zones. Data was collected among the three impact levels on the Paul Smith’s College property along the shores of Lower St. Regis Lake (impacted and minimally impacted) and Black Pond (benchmark). Deciduous and coniferous leaf litter was collected in the aquatic and terrestrial zones of the shoreline and among the three impact levels using 0.7 m2 terrestrial and 0.25 m2 aquatic quadrats, and then compared using nonparametric statistical tests to determine differences among impact levels and between zones. The results of this study revealed that the relationship between deciduous and coniferous leaf litter was more nuanced than expected. The study supported the current body of scientific knowledge in that shoreline development decreases the overall amount of leaf litter accumulated in the shoreline of lakes. However, should future studies on variation between deciduous and coniferous leaf litter be conducted, the criteria for impact levels should be expanded to ensure the sites used are more comparable in forest type.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2017
Authors: Hannah Ashdown