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Capstone Projects

Umami

Sat, 04/17/2021 - 08:19
Abstract: Since the beginning of humanity, our kind has been curious on how to create stimulatingly interesting cuisine. At earlier nomadic times and even before our ancestors savored parts of animals, plants and beverages such as alcohol. But why? This is the question we will analyze in depth in hopes to contribute a deep understanding of our complex sense of flavor. We know that we have taste senses. These include sweet, salty, sour and bitter. It is often that professionals and home cooks try to pair sweet and salty, sour and bitter and other combinations to create dimension and interest in varying foods. For example, sweet and sour chicken. Or take sour patch kids, bitter and sour. For some reason, these combinations keep us craving more. We begin discovering and learning how to taste at an early age deciding which foods are tasty and which foods aren’t so delicious. But how? How do we just know what is good and what isn’t good? The answer is we begin the process with learning that milk is good for us. Yes, this process begins as soon as an infant feeds off their mother in the form of breast milk. This is the beginning of us deciding between flavors we like and even deeper, know are nutritious or not so nutritious. The Pharmaceutical Journal writes “Their first neurological inputs come from molecular receptors for specific molecules in milk. A baby’s expression of taste is therefore a perceptual experience of nutrients and other chemicals”. There are receptors that line all the digestive track starting at the tongue, working down into the throat, the stomach and to the colon. Humans are said to have a digestive advantage because our mouths contain “multiple copy polymorphism of the salivary amylase gene” (Michie). Amylase is mainly created by the pancreas and salivary glands. The job of amylase is to break down starch molecules. This process turns complex carbohydrates into simple sugars that can be used as energy in the body (Akinfemiwa). It is suggested that because the human race has an innate ability to digest these starches earlier, we develop a sweet taste when consuming starches. From this early discovery we tend to crave sweeter foods and sources of nutrition when we’re younger in the form of higher sugar content and glutamate.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2021
File Attachments: Umami Paper Library.docx
Authors: Colby D. Moore
Fri, 05/08/2020 - 13:48
Abstract: Information about Umami
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: By: Vera Fatta

Plant-Based Capstone

Sun, 04/18/2021 - 20:10
Abstract: Plant-based options have been around for centuries. Although it has been a very slow rise in popularity, until now. It seems like this day and age everyone is looking for a healthier alternative and with that being said. Having a diet that is derived from plant-based products have been a huge go-to. “In the 1980s, Dr. T. Colin Campbell introduced the world of nutrition science to the term “plant-based diet” to define a low fat, high fiber, vegetable-based diet that focused on health and not ethics (healthline) There are so many options available within the markets and so many products to choose from whether that be a lentil salad or even tofu bacon. There is so many things that have been created and that have been lifted because of the plant-based movements. Many people are starting to realize how big of an impact the plant-based movement has had on other people and it then causes those people that see the successes of other to want to try it out for themselves. This movement even dates back to our early ancestors. It has been a practice that has always been talked about and in fact has been a huge factor in other countries diets because of what is available to them and their beliefs that they have within religion. There is just so much history behind these plant-based diets. There are so many different diets to choose from at that. It’s not just one strict diet where you can only eat plants. People have the availability to also eat fish, legumes, and so many other options to ensure that they get all the key nutrients to ensure their bodies perform the way they should. You can even see star athletes starting to follow the trend of going to a plant-based diet and trying to determine how they perform without having to use animal products to recover from their training sessions. There are many chef’s around the area that see the true qualities of going plant-based because they get the chance to work with all this amazing produce and see the true beauty behind the movement. You also see many restaurants, fast food chains and many other business’s that are starting to follow this trend because they know that it is going to be a big part of our lives here in the continuing future. These plant-based diets are just going to continue to grow larger and larger. Just like it has throughout history, with all the traditions within different cultures and religious ceremonies. This trend is on an uphill spiral and I don’t see it stopping anytime soon.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2021
Authors: Cody Young

Impacts of Minnow Species Composition on Marsh Feeding Ecology: A Look at Minnow Composition in Heron Marsh

Mon, 11/30/2020 - 16:07
Abstract: Minnows play an important role in marsh ecosystems as both predator and prey. The abundance of minnows in water systems makes them important tools for studying the feeding ecology of small prey fish. Minnow traps were set within specific regions and plots located in the Heron Marsh in the Adirondack Park, New York. These traps were baited and checked the next day, and minnows were identified by species then released. Trophic guilds were assigned to each minnow species based on literature and feeding habits. ANOVA tests were conducted to compare minnow species composition from the fall of 2020 in all regions of the marsh. Histograms were used to compare length-frequency over time and sites where minnows frequent. The composition of trophic guilds showed that carnivores were scarce, as creek chub only over 100mm were considered predatory, and they were not as frequent as smaller creek chub. Omnivorous generalist feeders were common but no specific site in the marsh had more omnivorous feeders than other sites. Finally, the abundance of insectivores was high in most sites, and highest in the forest ecology trail site. Length frequency of the two most caught fish, creek chub and finescale dace, were represented with histograms. Creek chub under 100mm were more abundant in every site than individuals larger than 100mm. Similarly, finescale dace 70mm and smaller were more common in every site.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology
Year: 2020
Authors: Emily Schmeltz

Fusion Cuisine Capstone

Wed, 12/02/2020 - 10:49
Abstract: Fusion cuisine is taking known elements of one's nation/country. Then applying those culinary elements to foreign ingredients thus making a fusion dish.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
Authors: Tu Ngo

Fusion Confusion

Wed, 05/06/2020 - 10:27
Abstract: Fusion cuisine is confusing is a statement and a question. The question half of it is a double-edged answer. Fusion is in itself simple but, when applying it to food, the idea can get muddled. To fully understand the meaning of this we will have to take a deeper look at the history behind food itself. Afterall knowledge is to be built on a strong foundation, much like food.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Capstone Profolio.docx
Authors: Shawna Gomez

Food Sustainability

Sun, 05/03/2020 - 22:50
Abstract: The purpose of my research was to find and use the various methods of food sustainability. That meant participating in the local farmers market and getting to know the community and sustainable practices. This research also gave me the chance to look at different cultures and practice of whole animal cooking, how they give back to their environment. This became more than just putting food on the plate, it's about how we get it there and what was done to accomplish that. What can we do in a modern era to keep sustainability alive and keep our stomachs full? Hopefully I was able to line out the few suggestions in my paper.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Joe's Research Paper.docx
Authors: Joseph Martin

The Lawns at Paul Smith’s College: The Effects of Mowing on Root Biomass and Soil Compaction

Mon, 12/07/2020 - 17:41
Abstract: Lawns are a valuable aspect of real estate in the United States. Maintained lawns cover over 163,000 square kilometers of land, yet few people realize the impact mowing can have on the ecosystem. This study will be looking at the impact of mowing on the grassland ecosystem and the terrain grassland ecosystem at Paul Smith’s College, located in Paul Smiths, New York. This study will be testing two different factors that are impacted by constant mowing on campus: soil compaction and root biomass of flora found on the sites. Soil compaction is the compression of soil due to large amounts of pressure placed on the surface soil. This event will be tested by using a soil bulk density test. The root biomass is being investigated by the use of a scale to weigh root given from each area of the study site. The study goal is to find out how the disturbances of mowing affect the grassland ecosystem found at Paul Smith’s College using two different factors: soil compaction, root biomass. The results of the study show the site type that has the greatest soil bulk density and the lowest dry root biomass in G/〖cm〗^3 is the dry slope site on the campus. Keywords: lawn ecology, effect of mowing, soil compaction, root biomass, root depth
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2020
Authors: Timothy I Murphy

The Lower St. Regis Lake Shoreline: Understanding the Past, Analyzing the Present, and Recommendations for the Future

Sat, 05/09/2020 - 11:54
Abstract: Continuing shoreline research and restoration planning will help Paul Smith’s College adhere to their own missions and visions including experiential learning, improving students' lives, and maintaining an ecological conscience as a community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2020
Authors: Zoe Plant, Thomas Firkins, Julie Capito, and Benjamin Marshall

Developing a Bird Integrity Index (BII) for Use as an Indicator of Stream Condition in the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/27/2020 - 12:50
Abstract: The primary goal of this research was to create a Bird Integrity Index (BII) to be used for the ecological integrity analysis of streams and their related riparian zones in the northern Adirondack Park based on frameworks provided by previous research in Oregon. Fifty-eight metrics were tested from avian survey (point count) data along fifteen stream reaches of 0.5km in length. These metrics represented aspects of avian taxonomic richness, dietary preferences, foraging techniques, tolerance or intolerance to human disturbance, and nesting strategies. To evaluate the responsiveness of each metric, they were plotted against an index of stream condition based on sampling of benthic macroinvertebrates according to the outline provided by the stream biomonitoring research unit of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Five of the fifty-eight candidate metrics remained after removing metrics that had an R2 value of less than .2 or were highly correlated. Individual avian metric scores ranged from 0-10 and BII scores were set on a scale of 0-100. While the BII presented here was successful in responding to varying conditions based on disturbance levels (R2= .64), due to multiple unexpected relationships between avian metrics and stream condition, it is proposed that more in-depth and comparative research be completed before an Adirondack specific BII is presented for field usage.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Ecological Restoration
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Jesse Rock Capstone.pdf
Authors: Jesse Rock