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Capstone Projects

White-tailed Deer Browse Preference: A Comparative Study of the Catskill and Adirondack Mountain Regions, New York State

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:23
Abstract: Abundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York State, United States, affect forest regeneration and stand composition through feeding (browse) pressure. White-tailed deer browse preference of six different hardwood tree species in two mountain ranges, the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, within New York State were compared in order to determine the extent of browse selection by deer. There were no statistically different browse selection by white-tailed deer within the Catskills or Adirondack study area or between each study site. Visual analysis of the study areas after concluding the study revealed that red maple (Acer rubrum) was the preferred browse species at each study site.
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Major: Biology, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Title, abstract, TOC , Report
Authors: John MacNaught, Blaine Kenyon, Mark Staats, Travis Boucher, Noah Finlayson-Gesten

Examination of Potentially Ectoparasite-driven Behavior in Burrowing Owls: Tests of Alternative Hypotheses

Thu, 05/07/2015 - 19:06
Abstract: Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia) and their nests harbor at least 39 species of arthropods from 21 different families. Among the ectoparasites on Burrowing Owls are fleas, which are primarily Pulex irritans (Family Pulicidae), the human flea. Fleas can number in the hundreds on individual Burrowing Owls. Thus, we hypothesized that flea infestation has shaped Burrowing Owl behavior to avoid the costs of ectoparasitism. As part of experiments using infrared trail cameras deployed at Burrowing Owl nests in southern Idaho ¬¬during 2012-2013, we noticed apparent sunning behavior in both adult and nestling Burrowing Owls. Camera images captured owls lying on the ground with wings outstretched and flat. We only observed this behavior during daylight hours, although cameras were active for 24 h/day. Sunbathing in birds is often associated with ectoparasite reduction, although sunning has not previously been examined in relation to flea infestation. During 2014 we conducted an experiment that included fumigating some nests with a flea removing insecticide and examined the prediction that sunbathing would occur more frequently in control nests where ectoparasites remained. As sunning was not during the coolest parts of the day, it did not appear to function for warming. Also, we ultimately found no difference in the frequency of sunning in fumigated and control nests, and there was no relationship between sunning and abundance of fleas on owls. Thus, the evidence is not consistent with the ectoparasite hypothesis, as owls sunned irrespective of flea load. We also evaluated the alternative hypotheses that sunning was related to thermoregulation, anting, drying or feather degrading bacteria. The first three we were able to reject, and the last will need future research.
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Major: Biology
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Skyler Wysocki

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation-OceanView

Sun, 05/03/2015 - 12:20
Abstract: This capstone was a business simulation where student managed and operated an online hotel and restaurant. OceanView was managed and operated by Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele and Veronika Vanisheuskaya. OceanView is located on the beautiful shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The reports in this file are the first year business plan, yearly analyses and final business plan.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: HOS 462 OceanView.docx
Authors: Kadie Ouellette, Ashlee Doele, Veronika Vanisheuskaya

Spring 2015 HOS 462- Final Capstone Submission

Mon, 05/04/2015 - 10:54
Abstract: Capstone Project: Our Capstone Simulation Course entailed running a Hotel Property out of Cape Cod Massachusetts. We had to make decisions as a group in order to execute and track the results of how our property was performing on a monthly basis. Our Business Model was targeted more towards business travelers. The following is our Analysis of how our property performed each Year throughout the Semester.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone-Final Submission
Authors: Rebecca Forman, Victor Dickson, Wyatt Gressler

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:57
Abstract: We as students in this course have been systematically redeveloping and managing a large multi-departmental hotel. This computer-simulated activity has given us the opportunity to achieve success through creative analysis to solve economic, social and environmental problems. The consequences of these decisions are reported and subsequently analyzed over a 3 year cycle of business. During our Capstone Celebration we have presented our results in a poster session and then provide a summative boardroom discussion of those internal and external forces and decisions that most powerfully affected our group’s successes, failures and adoption of change. This Paul Smith's College capstone experience has also allowed us to finalize our Paul Smith's education by giving us the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the general education core and programmatic learning objectives. We have also had the chance to apply skills, methodologies and knowledge learned during our courses of study, building on this undergraduate learning experience as we evaluate our readiness for the next stage in our professional development.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Nicolas Gonzalez, Lydia Kieffer, Luis Escala

HOS 462 Hospitality Business Simulation - Blue Diamond

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 16:25
Abstract: Over the course of the semester, our capstone class took on the role of General Manager of a hotel through a business simulation. Each month, decisions were made based off on financial reports and key performance indicators. This report is the result of the decisions made from Year 1 to Year 3. They include business plans, business analyses, editorial calender, and RFP documents.
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Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Amanda Middleton, Katrina Furuta, Matthew Bailey

Effective Computer Services

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 12:51
Abstract: Effective Computer Services (ECS) is a full service computer company with focus on personal computers and repair. Catering to the needs of the individual, ECS offers a personal touch of on-site service, repair, and software training. ECS offers a range of services from virus removal, data backup or file recovery, to complex small business networking. Effective Computer Services has the resources to complete a project on time and within with minimal turn-around time and at industry competitive prices. ECS offers a variety of new, used, and loaner computers. Its commitment to customer complete satisfaction and convenience is paramount. ECS works directly with customers to determine computer products that match users’ needs. ECS offers free consultation with any purchase from small personal computers to large network infrastructures
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: ECS bplan final (1).docx
Authors: James Finizio

Tetrodotoxin- toxicity of red efts (Notophthalmus viridescens) based on predatory selection

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:33
Abstract: Predators and prey have been coevolving for millions of years; those that have more aggressive relationships undergo more extreme selection as they become paired in an evolutionary arms race. This selection must affect both organisms to truly be an arms race; a relationship that accurately fits these criteria is that of the Eastern Red-Spotted Newt (red-efts) (Notophthalmus viridescens) and the Eastern Hognose Snake (Heterodon platirhinos). Samples of tetrodotoxin (TTX) extracted from red-efts were used to analyze a potential relationship between the efts and resistant predatory species. The values acquired upon analysis of samples were recorded from a population of organisms in an area vacant of the hognose and can be compared to areas where both species reside. Samples came from eighteen red-efts in a wetland located in the southeastern portion of the Adirondack Park where there are no known populations of the hognose snake. These samples were processed using various ELSIA grade chemicals, a procedure that concluded with ELSIA assays applicable for comparison to a set standard. By performing this study we hope to attain data pertaining to tetrodotoxin levels in red-efts that reflect an environment which does not contain hognose snakes, presented in the form of low levels of the specified toxin.
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Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Sarah Desrosier

Acidic Deposition in Adirondack Lakes: Episodic Acidification and Equilibrium

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 10:06
Abstract: Acid deposition has been a historic problem in the Adirondacks. Though after original mitigation attempts were deemed successful, funding for many acid deposition-monitoring programs in the area has been cut or eliminated, and much of the data that has been collected is now old and outdated. Newer data on this issue needed to be collected to determine if there truly has been recovery of Adirondack lakes. Through this observational experiment the pH levels of 18 different lakes scattered around the Adirondacks during winter were examined. The pH levels of the snow around the lakes were examined to determine the levels of acid shock. This data was compared to the historic data available and created a preliminary finding. This comparison helped determine that Adirondack water bodies could possibly be coming to a form of equilibrium as the pH levels are possibly returning to a resemblance of pre-disturbance conditions, which suggests recent legislation may have had measurable successes in the goal of reducing the acidification of Adirondack freshwater ecosystems.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Timothy Johnston, Andrew Olcott

An Examination of the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretative Center Trail Conditions and Suggested Sustainable Maintenance Practices

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 10:59
Abstract: The Adirondack Park is a 6.4 million acre state park in Upstate New York. With over 2,000 miles of hike able trails, this region is a popular tourist attraction in the Northeast. Thousands of people visit the Adirondack region to hike each year, which means that the trails within the park are subject to high intensity use. Natural resource management professionals such as the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) are concerned with the quality of trails winding through the region, and also promote awareness of the fragile alpine ecosystems resting atop the 5,000+ ft. tall mountains- which are constantly being degraded by human foot traffic. However, there are smaller and less maintained trails that run through our own backyard here at Paul Smith’s College, at the Visitors Interpretative Center (V.I.C.), with equally as fragile and important ecosystems. These range from bogs to eskers- the home of the rare and interesting Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia purpurea), to wetlands and riverine systems containing native heritage Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), populations such as the Windfall strain. Currently, there is no formal data documenting the condition of trails within the VIC property, therefore one may never know the true condition of the entire trail system. The Paul Smith’s V.I.C. can greatly benefit from applying recommended management techniques in the future using up to date information gathered in the spring of 2015. This report will provide new data, which will help management professionals examine the feasibility of applying accepted current and future sustainable trail management practices to the trails belonging to Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
File Attachments: NEWCAPSTONE.docx
Authors: Loretta Buerkle