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Capstone Projects

Tardigrade Abundance in Green Shield Lichens on Different Tree Species

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 18:43
Abstract: Many studies have been done on tardigrades, a microscopic, aquatic organism that feeds on plant cell fluid, bacteria, algae, protozoa, and other small invertebrates. Most of these studies have addressed their ability to survive extreme environments and not their preferred living habitats. Virtually no studies have been done investigating the ecology of tardigrades. This study focuses on which species of tardigrade live on a species of lichen (Common Greenshield Lichen, Flavoparmelia caperata) found on three species of trees; Red Maple (Acer rubrum), Black Cherry (Prunus serotina), and White Pine (Pinus strobus). Five trees of each species were chosen and five samples of the Common Greenshield Lichen were taken from all 25 trees during each of the fall and winter seasons. From every lichen sample processed, five slides were looked at, each containing two drops of the water that the lichen was suspended in for 2 hours. The samples were looked at underneath a compound microscope and a dichotomous key was used to identify tardigrades that were found. Due to the fact that liquid water is less available in winter, samples were taken during the fall and winter to look at the differences in species diversity and abundance. The greatest abundance of tardigrades was found on Red Maple, during both fall and winter. Black Cherry had the lowest abundance of tardigrades during both fall and winter. White Pine had an abundance less than that of Red Maple but greater than that of the Black Cherry. There were more tardigrades found on the lichen in fall than in winter. This implies that they find Red Maple a more suitable habitat than the Black Cherry and White Pine, may be related to acidity of the Black Cherry and White Pine being greater than that of Red Maple. Throughfall and stemflow on the trees may also contribute to habitat preference of the tardigrades.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Report.docx
Authors: Heather Cooner

New York State Feral Hog (Sus scrofa) Management Plan: Species Eradication and Public Education

Thu, 04/25/2013 - 11:22
Abstract: Feral hogs, also referred to as feral swine, Eurasian or Russian wild boar, and wild pigs, are the same species Sus scofa. They are an aggressive invasive species introduced to the United States in the 1500s and have spread over most of the country in the last few decades (Gipson et al. 1998). Due to their unique life history feral hogs are a persevering ungulate species capable of causing extensive economical and ecological damage while causing a threat to human health and safety. They are considered one of the world’s worst invasive species (Lowe et al. 2000). Extinction of native species and loss of biodiversity due to this widely invasive species has been documented worldwide (Wolf and Conover 2003). This management plan describes the life history of feral hogs, the need for management in New York State, several action plans to address the need for management, and assessment protocol for each action plan. Also included in this plan is a grant request to fund the educational objectives in order to achieve more awareness and cooperation with the public, promoting higher probability of management success.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Feral Hog Management Plan
Authors: William Schmieder Jr.

Compaction of Hiking Trails Located in the Northeastern Area of the Adirondack State Park, New York

Mon, 04/29/2013 - 12:19
Abstract: With continued increases in outdoor recreation in the United States, the physical impact of that use needs to be monitored for its effects. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a relationship exists between traffic numbers and soil strength of trails in the High Peaks Region of New York’s Adirondack state park. Soil strength was used as a measure of compaction because of its ability to indicate certain aspects of soil physical properties like bulk density, and hydrological condition (Mirreh & Ketcheson,1972), which are also soil physical properties that are effected by compaction (Hanna & Al-Kaisi,2009). These physical properties are important factors which influence a soils ability to carry out its biotic and abiotic processes (Kozlowski,1999). Initially the relationship between average soil strength of trails and traffic was insignificant. Upon further analyzing the data we found a significant relationship between on-trail and off-trail soil strength and used this relationship to create on-trail residual soil strengths. This was done to remove the influence that off-trail soil strength was having on the traffic vs. soil strength relationship. With the on/off-trail relationship influence removed, the relationship between on-trail residual soil strength and traffic was significantly improved. Literature discussed showed how the soil strengths collected could be used to infer possible effects on the sites tested. Relations between soil strength and bulk density, root elongation, root penetration, and trail recovery were all reviewed to provide insight on the quality of the soil at sample sites.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Karl Van Osch

No Known Antidote: Quantification of a deadly toxin, tetrodotoxin, in red efts (Notopthalamus viridescens; Rafinesgue, 1820)

Mon, 04/29/2013 - 17:42
Abstract: Tetrodotoxin (TTX) in found in taxa worldwide including the eft life stage of the eastern newt (Notopthalamus virisdescens). Previous studies have shown that there is variability of TTX concentrations within efts and newts, and it is not known if the presence of TTX in these efts is common among populations. Our objective was to determine the distribution of TTX within the body N. viridescens efts. We hypothesized that the skin would have the highest concentrations of TTX as it is the area of the body that will likely come into contact with a predator. If certain regions of the skin come into contact with a predator more often than others, there may be significant differences in the dorsal, abdominal and pectoral regions of skin. Further, we hypothesized that the ova would have the second highest concentration of TTX as they are vital to reproduction yet vulnerable to predation. Through HPLC analysis we determined the concentrations of TTX within different tissues of N. viridescens efts including the: dorsal, pectoral, and abdominal skin; ovaries; testes; liver; pancreas; and alimentary canal. The concentrations of TTX between the different tissue types are not significantly different, nor were individuals significantly different in concentration of TTX from one another. Toxicity levels were high in comparison to other N. viridescens efts and more similar to the toxicity of highly toxic Taricha newts. The high toxicity of N. viridescens could be contributed to strong predation pressure by the slightly resistant garter snake (Thamnopsis sirtalis) and eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos).
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
Authors: Kimberly M. Forrest

Northern Suds - A Business Plan

Thu, 12/05/2013 - 08:09
Abstract: Northern Suds is new business being started in the North Country. The products from Northern Suds include detergents and cleaners that are additive and dye free. Products are made with eco-friendly, all natural ingredients. All products are also handmade. Northern Suds will begin selling products via Etsy.com and Craigslist.org on or around January 1st, 2014. Products will also be available for purchasing at the Saranac Lake Famers’ Market. The business came from the need for inexpensive allergy friendly products. The plan provided has full financials in addition to the results from testing surveys.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2013
Authors: Shelby Treadwell

Paul Smith's Car Sharing Program: A feasibility study of implementing a car-sharing program at Paul Smiths

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 16:21
Abstract: Car-sharing is a program in which companies own a fleet of vehicles, insure them, maintain them, and offer memberships to people who wish to use them. Car-sharing is an eco-friendly way to use a vehicle when needed without the need to own one. These programs are environmentally friendly as well as cost effective. Paul Smith’s college is an environmentally friendly campus currently lacking an effective program to reduce emissions on campus. In addition to the absence of an efficient program to reduce emissions, Paul Smith’s College is experiencing a shortage of parking spots due to the excessive number of vehicles parked here. In effort to take further steps towards being an environmentally friendly campus and reduce the number of vehicles parked on campus, a feasibility study to implement a car-sharing program on Paul Smith’s College campus will be conducted.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies, Integrative Studies
Year: 2013
File Attachments: draft4.4.doc
Authors: Ray Honsinger, Lance Ryan

Serving Those Who Served: A study of how small rural colleges can better meet the needs of their student veterans

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 23:14
Abstract: Currently many veterans are returning from combat and are seeking to obtain a post-secondary education at a college or university through the use of their GI Bill. However, it is unknown whether or not these institutions properly meet the needs of student veterans. The purpose of this exploratory study is to determine how and to what extent small rural colleges can better meet the needs of student veterans when compared to larger institutions that have more resources. Data will be collected through the use of primary and secondary research. The responses collected will then be aggregately analyzed to determine how the student veterans at Paul Smith’s College’s needs are being met and what they would like to see the college do to improve or implement resources and programs to better meet their needs. Additionally, the research plans to query veteran students at two larger universities in an urban setting. The results of this study will help small rural colleges become more military friendly, which could potentially attract more veterans interested in attending the college, and assist them with the transition from the military lifestyle to college and civilian life.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Stephanie Karr Capstone.doc
Authors: Stephanie Karr