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Capstone Projects

Can Restauranteurs Successfully Influence Guest Behavior By Using Facebook?

Sun, 12/02/2012 - 20:55
Abstract: Facebook is a form of social media used by millions on a daily basis. Restauranteurs’ ability to use Facebook to influence guest behavior, build a connection, and receive comments could potentially benefit their restaurants. This study was conducted on Facebook, sending surveys to my “friends,” discovering how restaurants’ Facebook pages are affecting them. Seeing how my study was based on Facebook it was appropriate to only conduct the surveys on this form of social media. The goal was to find if restauranteurs could attract more customers to their restaurant by influencing guest behavior on Facebook. This will prove if using Facebook is a worthwhile marketing tool. People interested in this topic will become more knowledgeable about this form of social media from a business perspective and the Facebook company could benefit from this study as well. This study will give recommendations to restauranteurs on how to make their restaurant “stand out” on Facebook.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Joshua Werksman

Do Adirondack Farmers Perceive Aquaponics as a Solution to the Lack of Year Round Out of Season Local Food?

Sun, 12/02/2012 - 23:59
Abstract: Several different factors contribute to the farmers of the Adirondacks inability to produce sustainable, fresh, local food out of season. This study will provide a comprehensive literature-review-based overview of modern day farming, aquaponics, local food sheds, and the farmers associated with Adirondack Harvest and Green Circle. This capstone seeks to determine via surveys if aquaponics is a solution to the challenges Adirondack farmers face today in their lack of year round productivity. The consensus of this capstone will determine if aquaponics is a solution to the challenges Adirondack farmer’s face regarding the lack of local out of season food for the residents of the Adirondack region.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Aquaponics Capstone
Authors: Ashley Rokjer

You Are What You Eat

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 18:12
Abstract: Food plays a huge role for all living organisms. The focus and purpose of this research is to determine if Paul Smith’s College students are getting the nutrients they need to perform well in school. Students need nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals that will help fuel the mind and body. These nutrients can have a tremendous effect on how the body’s behavior, specifically how it copes with stress and memory. The data was collected by observing the food choices offered in the Paul Smith’s College dining hall. It benefits students to have a balanced meal to nourish the mind and body. Offering healthy choices and promoting a balanced diet will benefit the students at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: You are what you eat
Authors: Courtney Sypher

Vertical Gardens

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 21:08
Abstract: Vertical gardens have the potential to be both functional and serve as decoration in the modern restaurant. This Capstone will study vertical gardens and restaurants in the United Sates that currently have vertical gardens, in an effort to determine if vertical gardens could be a profitable investment for the modern restaurant, if vertical gardens are practical for restaurants to have and maintain, and if the vertical garden could serve as a decoration to the restaurants’ guests. Methods will include interviewing chefs and owners of these restaurants and surveying restaurant patrons to measure the amount of value that the restaurant customer places on the idea of vertical gardens in restaurants. The results will prove whether or not the idea of a vertical garden in the restaurant is cost effective, while also providing decoration in the dining room and enhancing the customer experience. Vertical gardens are an integral part of the fresh, local food movement. It is incredibly important for students and professionals alike, to study this important new trend in the industry, especially as the fresh food movement is currently trending.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: FINAL.docx
Authors: Kayla Saenz

Determining the Authenticity in Ethnic Cuisines

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 21:10
Abstract: The United States is often referred to as a melting pot. As many cultures have melded together, so have their cuisines. In recent years, ethnic cuisines’ demand has grown steadily and the market has become saturated with restaurants claiming to be authentic. With this popularity of ethnic foods in the United States, a demand for increased authenticity in ethnic restaurants is higher than ever. However, what makes an ethnic restaurant authentic? The purpose of this study is to look at the opinions of both consumers and industry professionals to find what each group finds important when determining authenticity. Research was done via online surveys sent to culinary professionals working in ethnic restaurants and diners of ethnic restaurants to determine what each population deemed most important when preparing ethnic food and when choosing an ethnic restaurant. The outcome of this study can be used by any person looking to open an authentic ethnic restaurant or looking to improve on their already existing restaurant.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Blue Swan Otto

Pop Up Restaurants: Are They Here to Stay? A Study of Consumer and Professional Awareness and Future Demand

Fri, 04/20/2012 - 13:23
Abstract: The focus of this study is to determine in the next 10 to 15 years if pop up restaurant will become a new permanent venue. This study provides information for professionals and people entering the restaurant industry for potential job opportunities. Pop ups are a style of restaurant that takes over a venue for a short period of time (48 hours to a week). This research is based on professional willingness to enter the pop up industry and research measuring consumer knowledge of pop ups and future demand. Research is based on surveys filled out by the general population, and surveys to restaurant professionals.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone.doc
Authors: De Anna Wasiewski

Soulful Dishes - A study of Geechee/Gullah Cooking

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 21:45
Abstract: Every culture has its own cuisine. In the United States, people have emigrated from many different countries. The authenticity and tradition of native food is showcased in various ways. The public has an array of options when it comes to eating different types of food from around the world. Geechee/Gullah (GG) food is not as obtainable. This research is based on the origin and culture of GG people, how their culture is expressed through their cuisine, cooking techniques, and authentic signature dishes. Under the guidance of Chefs Michael Carmel, Kevin Mitchell, and Charlotte and Frank Jenkins, each of whom have experience and knowledge of the subject, the outcome will produce signature dishes that will be available for the public to taste. Exploratory research consisting of interviews and field notes will be the research methods used. Signature dishes and a presentation will provide the general audience with information and awareness of GG cuisine.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Jacqueline Hite

A MULTI-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF FOREST HARVESTING FOR WOODY BIOFUELS ON MAMMALIAN COMMUNITIES IN A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST

Fri, 02/01/2013 - 16:19
Abstract: Forest harvesting and subsequent effects on forest structure have been shown to influence mammalian community assemblages and the abundance of individual species, however less attention has been paid to the implications of how harvested timber is used. This is particularly relevant in the Northern Forest, where a considerable portion of the forest harvesting is used to produce biofuels. Biofuels harvesting typically involves the process of whole-tree chipping which may lead to a dramatic reduction in the amount of woody material in the form of slash and coarse woody debris (CWD) left in harvested stands. The goal of our study was to assess the effects of biofuels harvesting on forest structure and subsequent effects on mammalian community structure and abundance. To address this goal, we focused on a ~35 Ha area of partially-harvested northern hardwood forest in the northern Adirondacks, New York. To sample mammals we used a combination of Sherman traps and track plates established at two scales across stands within this area. Our results showed that the response of small mammals to changes in forest structure is both species and scale specific. At the individual trap scale, CWD, slash, and understory cover were important drivers of the occurrence of individual species of small mammals. At the larger “grid” scale, small mammal relative abundance was driven by canopy cover and the density of woody stems. Our results indicate that the current harvesting practices used for biofuel production in the Adirondacks are unlikely to result in declines in abundance of common small mammal species. However, the retention of some slash post-harvest may be beneficial to some species, thus foresters may want to include slash retention when developing silvicultural prescriptions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
Authors: Cody Laxton, Alisha Benack, Danielle Ball, Scott Collins, Sam Forlenza, Richard Franke, Stephanie Korzec, Alec Judge, Connor Langevin, Jonathan Vimislik, Elena Zito

Sharing the John Dillon Park Experience with More Visitors: A marketing and management strategy, to increase visitor usage concentrating on organizations for people with disabilities and Veterans

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 17:54
Abstract: International Paper John Dillon Park (JDP) is a fully accessible campground managed by Paul Smith's College (PSC). Fully accessible means it was designed so anyone, regardless of the presence of a disability, can utilize the facility. The campground has not been near full capacity since it was opened in 2006. PSC wishes to increase those visitor numbers concentrating on Veterans and organizations for people with disabilities. A survey was conducted of the current park visitors to obtain information needed to help define the desired demographic and other information needed for the marketing strategy of JDP. These visitor responses showed that PSC needs to concentrate its marketing efforts into better contact with its current users to stimulate return users, make a few changes to the facilities themselves, and advertise within magazines, Veteran organizations, organizations for people with disabilities and Fort Drum. Also, the responses informed PSC that it needs to provide for the recollection phase of the recreational experience by selling JDP souvenirs. With an increase in the visitor usage of JDP, more people will be able to appreciate the serenity of nature and the camping experience JDP offers to all people.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Jeffrey T. Bellaire.pdf
Authors: Jeffrey T. Bellaire

An Analysis of Possible Forest Type Shifts due to Asian Longhorned Beetle Invasion in the Northern Hardwood Forest of Hebron, NY

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:10
Abstract: The Asian Longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is an invasive alien insect that poses a severe threat to forests of the northeastern United States. If this insect is allowed to run rampant through our forests there will be huge economic and ecological implications. This study hopes to provide a better understanding of these potential implications and provide potential policies for managing and controlling this insect that has potentially devastating effects on the hardwood forests of the northeast. The study on hand will explore the effects on current forest types in Hebron, NY and what future regeneration may look like in the aftermath of an ALB infestation. ALB has the potential to completely change not only the landscape but also alter current markets based around the northern hardwood stand type. This study was designed to attempt to grasp the magnitude and effects of an infestation by ALB. Current policies were reviewed to attempt to create a possible set of management strategies that could be used to minimize the effects of the ALB. Possible forest type shifts were predicted for the area based upon species range and soil types present in the study area. It is important to understand not only what ALB is capable of but also what can be expected to happen if or when it does move through the area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Complete Project.docx
Authors: Leonard Jenkins, Robert Bell, Schuyler VanAuken