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Capstone Projects

Short & Sweets Bakery

Mon, 12/02/2019 - 17:49
Abstract: For Capstone, we were to create a business plan for our future bakery. We were to establish a location for our future business, research the area and competition, design a menu, create a shift schedule and job descriptions, calculate expenses we would need to incur, and conduct an interview with an owner of a bakery that is similar to what we aspire our bakery to be one day. In addition, we were to choose a signature item which was featured in the A.P Smith's Bakery on campus for a week. Free samples were offered in return for completed surveys as a way for us to gather feedback about our product. The results, process, and problems that arose while preparing the signature item were then analyzed. Overall, Capstone allowed us to outline a plan of action that will help in our future endeavors to own a business.
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Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Amanda Kern

Scratch Baking vs. Premixed/Prepared Baking

Thu, 05/02/2019 - 16:55
Abstract: Can people tell the difference between completely scratch made baked goods, and those with premixed/prepared elements; and how does this play a role in decision making when opening and operating a small retail bakery business? This project was conducted to test premade dough and/or mixes against scratch recipes to see how any additional ingredients and preservatives may alter the final product. Both groups of baked goods were tested against one another and the differences in appearance, taste/texture, food cost, and labor cost were noted. A blind tasting was conducted to compare different samples of scratch baked and prepared item and feedback was gathered from participants for analysis. This was also to see if the participants could differentiate the two group of products without knowing the topic of the project. The profit margin was then calculated and analyzed to determine the use of the products selected in a retail bakery. Research was conducted on different components of opening and operating a small bakery business that could possibly be affected by choosing to use scratch baking vs. premixed/prepared elements. Using a combination of both may be an option. Research components also includes consistency, marketability and availability, in addition to food and labor costs.
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Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Skyler Lyons

A Taste Of Place: How Terroir Effects Maple Syrup

Fri, 05/03/2019 - 15:35
Abstract: Production of maple syrup starts within the tree, acer saccharum. These trees, more commonly known as sugar maples, produces maple sap. Maple sap is then, through the boiling process, transformed into Maple syrup. A study was then performed to see if one could taste the difference in Maple syrup. This test proves that there is a difference in maple syrup from different regions. Terroir of maple syrup is then compared to terroir of other things, such as wine, and shows how one would go about tasting and describing the taste of Maple Syrup.
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Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Charli Fowler

Can you tell the difference between Dietary Restricted desserts and their regular versions?

Mon, 05/06/2019 - 10:19
Abstract: Our question for Capstone was whether or not people could tell the difference between dietary restricted desserts and their regular versions. The restrictions we chose were Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Vegan, and Dairy Free. We physically tested and noted the differences in look, texture, taste, food cost, and labor. We conducted a blind taste test in the Old St. Regis open to the Faculty, Staff, and students of the PSC Community. People participating were able to see and taste and record their answers in a survey.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Victoria Schickedanz & Emma Stoddard

Natural Versus Artificial Food Coloring and Flavoring

Tue, 05/07/2019 - 01:12
Abstract: Natural Versus Artificial Food Coloring and Flavoring- Sampling natural and artificial dyes and flavorings side by side, to see which was preferred and if people could tell the difference.
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Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Kenadhe Howell

Ancient Breads in a Modern World

Thu, 05/09/2019 - 16:09
Abstract: Is is possible to take ancient breads and bring them up to today's modern tastes. I took three ancient breads (a roman bread, a medieval bread, and a Viking bread) and attempted to make a savory and sweet version of each that were up to today's modern and contemporary tastes. As well a providing historical research on the breads from each time period, and the earliest history of breads.
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Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Jordan A. Perron

Bread Fermentation

Fri, 05/31/2019 - 15:11
Abstract: How does the length of fermentation time affects the flavor of bread? A look into the process of bread making and the steps of fermentation and how flavor is developed. An experiment using sourdough starters by making three over the course of the semester and baking bread from each starter in order to determine if the starter's age affects the flavor of the finished product.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2019
Authors: Kayla Lyons

What Are the Differences in Trichome Density and Morphology Between Arabidopsis Lyrata Subsp. Lyrata Populations When Grown in A Northern Common Garden, Outside of Their Geographic Distribution?

Tue, 04/30/2019 - 15:23
Abstract: Trichomes are diverse among plants. There is evidence suggesting that environmental factors may influence these structures and their densities. Other evidence shows that weather may influence genetics and gene expression. Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata is a wild flower that is native to North America and Europe and has been extensively studied. Literature regarding Arabidopsis states that within the family and genus, there is evidence suggesting that trichomes can be either non-branched, twice branched or thrice branched. This study’s purpose was to analyze how trichome density, and morphology in Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata differs between populations when grown outside of the natural distribution limit. Four populations of Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata were studied based on latitude. After analyzing the outcomes, unexpectedly there are no major differences between the north and south populations; however, there are differences between the four populations. Based on the data gathered, it was determined that the population, North2 (07G) must be genetically different from the other three populations. The four populations were grown together in a common garden; thus, all variables were the same. The environment did not influence trichome density or morphology within the North2 population, therefore the structures were genetically pre-determined.
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Major: Biology
Year: 2019
File Attachments: Scarabaggio_A.docx
Authors: Amber My Scarabaggio

Monitoring the Zebra Mussel Invasion Front: Use of New Technology

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 15:39
Abstract: Zebra mussels are invasive mollusks that are affecting the well-being of the water bodies in the United States. This study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) is a sensitive early detection system that may be useful in monitoring their spread. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of eDNA technology in identifying infested water bodies, to determine if zebra mussel DNA is in the Adirondack water bodies not known to be infested, if the water chemistry of these water bodies is favorable for zebra mussel establishment, and if the eDNA technology is transferable to an institution like Paul Smith’s College. Eighteen lakes, all in New York State were sampled, fifteen of which are located in the Adirondack Park. DNA was extracted from water and plankton samples and species specific primers were used for PCR amplification to determine if zebra mussel DNA was present. Of seven samples taken from sites known to be infested, five of these tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Four lakes not known to be infested within the Park also tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Based on zebra mussel risk parameters (water chemistry) applied to 1,469 Adirondack water bodies, less than 3% are at risk of zebra mussel establishment. However it is possible that established populations could occur at microsites that may have locally high levels of calcium and higher pH.
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Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Alexandria Bevilacqua, John Bishop, Charles Cain, Tyler Clark, Seth Crevison, Robert Culyer, Ryan Deibler, Brian DeMeo, Jonathan Eckert, Kirsten Goranowski, Joelle Guisti, Alan Jancef, Korinna Marino, Michelle Melagrano, KaitlynNedo, Joseph Nelson, Aaron Palmieri, Cole Reagan, John Scahill, JohnathanStrassheim, Scott Travis, Sarah Van Nostrand and Sarah Vella

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick