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Capstone Projects

Outward Bound semester: Skills to last a life time

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The focus of this study will examine the level at which an Outward Bound semester fosters personal growth, connection with nature, and hard skills. This particular Outward Bound semester course traveled from the Florida Keys then on to Costa Rica and Panama in Central America. The course focused on the water elements of sailing, surfing, whitewater rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. Methods used include personal journal reflections, peer and instructors oral and written responses. The researcher was an active participant in the immersive experience and kept a journal of the entire experience trying to gather as much information about the course itself and reflecting on the research process throughout. This research indicated that this experience developed personal character and a connection with nature. These skills have an impact deeper than an isolated course with Outward Bound but can be transferred to daily life.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Sam Annable

Evaluating the Recovery of Lakes from Acid Deposition in the Adirondack Park

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 22:49
Abstract: Acid rain has been an environmental problem since the 1980’s and has been a core issue in the Adirondack Park located in the northern part of New York State. Acid rain is created by acidic gases from anthropogenic uses that mix in the atmosphere with precipitation and forms acid deposition. Acid Rain lowers the pH of water which has detrimental effects on the biota living within lakes. There is a general consensus that the chemistry of lake water is recovering from acid deposition, however, there have not been sufficient studies on the state of recovery from acid rain in the Adirondack Park or much of the United States. This study will investigate if lake recovery is indeed happening in the Adirondack Park. This study analyzed the water chemistry of lakes using data collected from the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation (ALSC) and New York State Department of Conservation (DEC). The object of this study is to find a trend in the water chemistry and combine it with DEC data to evaluate the present condition of lakes within the park. The results showed that there are not significant correlations of the data besides SO42- concentrations, which have been approving in the park in the last 20 years.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Timothy Grossman, Ryan Kish

Managing Growth: A Study of Succession Practices in Family Restaurants

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 21:59
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent the succession and management practice of a family-owned restaurant correlates to its success as a business. This exploratory, qualitative study will ask what do family restaurants consider to be the most successful succession planning strategies in their businesses. This study will help to better understand and identify the significance of succession practices. The methodology used will be a structured interview. The questions asked during the interview will be “yes” or “no” answers with the option to elaborate if necessary. Family restaurants are measured using interviews in Tioga County, Pennsylvania and data will be collected upon interview. Data from the interview will be analyzed and compiled together to show family restaurants optimal succession planning practices. The outcome of this study can be used by family restaurants seeking to pass down their business to younger generations.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: FINAL CAPSTONE.doc
Authors: Elizabeth Compton

Food Allergic Patrons: An exploratory study of controlling allergens

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 17:21
Abstract: In the food service industry there is a consumer market and a need for allergy free options, a.k.a. safe dining options for those consumers who suffer from food allergies. Dining rooms, kitchens and other food handling departments, specifically in hotels, are not allergen free. There is a definite potential for cross-contamination somewhere amongst the flow of food handling. It could be anywhere from the receiving department to the delivery of the finished product at the consumer’s table. The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent restaurant management can control harmful food allergens and successfully stop cross-contamination. This qualitative, inductive study will explore and determine in what manner restaurant management and staff can control the spread of harmful allergens within hotels and whether or not there is a foolproof way to stop cross-contamination. Through interview research methods a detailed study on the restaurants’ food handling practices will be conducted. The researcher will interview the employees of the establishment, and through a series of specific questions created by the researcher to establish a standard grading criteria, these results will be analyzed. Once several different establishments have been interviewed and data has been collected, through careful analysis, the researcher will be able to determine if the restaurant’s staff was able to control food allergens at any point. If food establishments within hotels are concerned with making themselves safer and worry-free places for the consumer to eat, they will be interested in using the results of this study to establish safer standards and all around food practices.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Final
Authors: Evan Sullivan

Ritz-Carlton and the Campus Visit Experience

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 22:48
Abstract: The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore to what extent the transfer of service from Ritz Carlton practices and the Hospitality Guest Cycle can be intergraded into higher education enrollment procedures, specifically the campus visit using Paul Smith’s College as a model. Research from this study can contribute support to transfer of service methods for similar higher education enrollment institutions by way of increasing student engagement throughout the experience. Methodology will include creating a rubric designed to break down the campus tour process into the four groups of the Guest Cycle that will compare with Ritz Carlton guidelines to observe performance levels followed by an analysis and further recommendations to Paul Smith’s College. A goal is to be able to clearly identify gaps in the campus visit procedures to allow for growth and new procedures to be put in place that positively reflect Ritz Carlton service standards and the Hospitality Guest Cycle. Information gathered in a rubric encompassing the Ritz Carlton Standards and the Hospitality Guest Cycle could be used by other small rural private colleges as a design for improvement.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
Authors: Siobhan Shea