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Capstone Projects

Forest Management Plan for A.P. Smith Rod and Gun Club

Fri, 05/06/2022 - 10:08
Abstract: New York is a popular destination for upland game hunting. American woodcock (Scolopax minor), ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) are all species that are highly sought after by hunters. This forest management plan, prepared by students at Paul Smith’s College in spring of 2022, aims to improve populations of these species on the Onchiota property. The reason for increasing game abundance on the property is to attract hunters which will legitimize the prospect of the A.P. Smith Rod and Gun Club. This plan is to be used in tandem with prior student projects which have outlined the steps necessary for the creation of a rod and gun club. Prior studies have projected infrastructure needs, possible membership numbers and costs of membership, operating costs of the club, and other uses of the property. Management of the forest for these three game species will also be advantageous to other animal species, including white-tailed deer, moose, and various songbirds. Truly, by managing for the target species there will be an increase in the health of the whole ecosystem. The property will also be able to serve in an educational capacity. It will serve as a demonstration of sound forest management for game species propagation. The scope of this management plan extends 35 years from 2022 to 2057.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2022
Authors: Zachary Cowperthwait, Thomas Curiale, Maxwell Dentone, Donovan Hack, Micah Kelly, Shane Mabie, Dale Plant, Tyler Richardson, Robert Russell, Ryan Thomas, Daniel Tomlinson, and Brandon Snow

Onchiota Wetland Delineation Paul Smiths College Municipality of Franklin, Franklin County, New York

Fri, 05/06/2022 - 10:15
Abstract: This project is a wetland delineation of the Onchiota management unit of Paul Smith’s College property. This was performed to be integrated into the forest management plan for this unit. Wetland areas were determined using GIS analysis, then ground truthing was performed to calculate the accuracy of the proposed wetland areas. For the GIS analysis, LiDAR data was used to create a deterministic topographic wetland index to locate wetland areas and predict their boundaries. Ground truthing was performed by walking the boundary of each proposed wetland area. Comparison between the proposed and true wetland boundaries was used to calculate the accuracy of the GIS wetland delineation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2022
Authors: Scott Crum

Outdoor Classroom: Maintenance and Design

Mon, 05/02/2022 - 12:37
Abstract: Taking the classroom outside can have a wide variety of benefits for students' psychological and physical wellbeing. Paul Smith's College currently has one outdoor classroom on its campus as of the Spring 2022 semester to take advantage of these benefits. To expand outdoor learning for courses on Paul Smith's College Campus, we designed a second outdoor classroom. We received input from the Campus community through two survey we developed to discern the need for a second classroom, evaluate the existing classroom, evaluate the accommodations needed, and gain necessary information on other considerations for the design and location. Based on the survey results, using GIS to assess potential locations, and conducting interviews, we chose a site to focus on and developed a maintenance plan for the future management of both the existing and proposed classrooms.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Parks and Conservation Management, Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2022
Authors: Shannon McPheeters
, Rebecca Durinick
, Nathanial Brangan
, Derek Thompson
, Annie DeHaven

Benefits of Outdoor Learning for Students: Grades, Attention, ADHD/ADD, & Behavior

Sun, 05/01/2022 - 21:29
Abstract: This study examines the physical and physiological influences of outdoor learning on students. A majority of my research is based on studies and research done by others that assess the benefits of nature exposure on students' standardized test scores, attention, behavior, and overall student achievement. Through the use of an 18-question survey research was collected and data were examined in order to determine whether or not students felt satisfied or dissatisfied with outdoor classrooms. They were being assessed to see if they had different attitudes towards outdoor classrooms than indoor classrooms. The findings of this study are discussed in relation to the additional research found below. Keywords: Outdoor classrooms, Outdoor learning, benefits of outdoor learning on attention, behavior, grades, etc.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2022
Authors: Claudia Swan

Soil moisture levels’ impact on variation in microhabitat selection and distribution between shrub species along the riparian zones of the St. Regis River in Northern New York

Sat, 11/28/2020 - 15:42
Abstract: Willows (Salix spp.) are commonly found along riparian zones of northern latitude water bodies and are often used in riparian restoration and bank stabilization. However, not much is known about willows on a species level, especially among thee shrubby species native to North America. This study seeks to better understand the variation in the distribution of three willows (Salix bebbiana, S. discolor, and S. petiolaris) and two other shrub species (Alnus incana and Viburnum nudum) on a species level based on soil moisture. To reach this goal this study analyzes their distribution at several points along the shore of the St. Regis River. The study analyzed vertical distance from the river as a proxy for soil moisture, saturation volume as a proxy for porosity, and bulk density. It was found that soil moisture, as approximated by vertical distance was statistically significantly linked to the distribution of different shrub species. Porosity, bulk density, and distance along the river had no statistically significant relationship. The results supported the hypothesis that willows had the highest soil moisture requirements. The sample sizes were very small and only one willow, a S. petiolaris, was found in the study sites.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2020
File Attachments: G.Davis_Capstone_final.docx
Authors: Gregory Davis

Alumni Campground Lean-to Design Analysis

Sat, 05/09/2020 - 11:32
Abstract: When thinking about the Adirondacks, lean-tos are among the first that come to mind. The Adirondack lean-to has, for most of the parks history, been a staple for back country shelters. The design of the lean-to is the most important part about them. Traditionally built with full round logs to have three walls and one open side with an overhang from the roof. Notches in the logs at each corner of the lean-to allow for the structure to be more ridged then if notches were not used. The goal behind this project is to look at the design of the Adirondack lean-to and see what about it could be simplified to make plans for an easier to build and construct lean-to.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Conservation and Management, Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2020
Authors: Michael J Gaulin

Assessment of Barriers and Solutions to Obtaining Local Food on Paul Smith's College Campus

Mon, 05/11/2020 - 01:46
Abstract: Throughout the course of the last century, food systems have profoundly shifted from a primarily locally focused diet, to a virtually infinite global array of options. The many negative impacts of this momentous shift are now becoming more evident overtime. With light being recently shined upon these adverse effects, a substantial shift back to more local food options has begun. However, with all this newfound attention placed on localizing food systems, the meaning of local food has adapted an endless number of meanings. Paul Smith’s College agricultural instructor, Sara Dougherty echoed this feeling by saying, “‘Local food’ has been defined in a variety of ways, and we've seen this definition change and morph over time” (Dougherty). This evolving conversation around the benefits local food can have on communities has caused many entities to reassess their own food systems. More specifically, institutions of learning have increasingly rallied behind this movement. “Bringing healthy, locally produced food into institutions has been proposed as an effective strategy to address social, economic, and environmental issues” (“CAMPUS DINING”). Though the specifics of each sustainable food system are unique, they often share similar goals and values. Many of these values happen to also be innately engrained in the principles of which Paul Smith’s College was founded on.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2020
File Attachments: Capstone Paper SUS 496.docx
Authors: Hannah Rion

The influence of a common parent on sap sweetness among open pollinated sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) offspring

Wed, 05/08/2019 - 15:08
Abstract: Beginning in the 1950s, the United States Forest Service began to look into the ability to predict and control the heritability of sap sweetness in sugar maples (Acer saccharum Marsh.). A search for genetically superior (sweeter) trees was conducted across 6 states, testing 21,000 trees. Only 53 trees were chosen to be parental stock for the “Super Sweet” sugar maple improvement program. These trees, cloned through rooted cuttings and scion wood grafting, were planted in the Grand Isle, VT clonal bank. One of the five progeny tests of open pollinated offspring from the clonal bank was established in Lake Placid, New York. These trees had their first evaluation at age ten. Each tree had its diameter and height measured, as well as its sap sweetness tested. Now, 35 years after planting, the trees were evaluated again. An inventory was conducted with diameter at breast height, tree height, and live crown ratio measurements. Of the 725 trees planted, only 396 trees remain. Only 258 trees were of size and quality to handle a 5/16” tap. Their sap sweetness was measured at multiple times though out the season. Knowing one of the two parents of each tree allowed for the comparison of the sap sweetness of the different common-parent groups. The data collected did not support that the knowledge of only one parent could be used to predicts a tree’s sweetness relative to any other parent’s offspring. The bigger picture progeny evaluations will continue the “Super Sweet” sugar maple improvement program.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2019
Authors: Eric Mance

Reinvigoration of the Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve: Stakeholder Perceptions

Tue, 05/08/2018 - 15:02
Abstract: The Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve (CABR) was designated by the United Nations in 1989. This reserve spans the entire Adirondack Park, and includes the Lake Champlain Valley in Vermont as well. Biosphere reserves focus on conservation at a global level, and use international knowledge from lessons learned to best benefit each specific biosphere. Although CABR was designated in 1989, it became classified as inactive soon after. In 2016, Brian Houseal, Director of SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry Newcomb Campus, prepared a periodic report to UNESCO on CABRs current status. The goal of this research was to determine the probability of stakeholder support to bring CABR out of inactivity, almost 20 years after it was designated originally. The research performed focused on stakeholders’ awareness and perceptions of the CABR, along with past indications of concerns and resistance among local residents. The research addresses this deficit and identifies and clarifies our representative’s samples perceptions of the designation. The research revealed that land use rights were still the major concern. The research revealed that this was still a concern because there is still a major lack of information on the CABR land classifications/land use rights. Information on CABR was concluded to be one of the largest challenges at this time. This research revealed that 68% of the residents were unaware of CABR until the periodic review was published in 2016, and over 40% of the residents had no idea what CABR was until they received an invite to come to the focus group.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Arboriculture and Landscape Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Coolidge Capstone 2018.docx
Authors: Nicholas Coolidge

Vista Wellness: An Educational Community Center for the Glenview Preserve

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 23:29
Abstract: The Glenview Preserve is home to a beautiful open vista of the High Peaks. This land was recently purchased by the Adirondack Land Trust and is looking for ways to sustainably manage the property by utilizing Paul Smith’s College capstone students for recommendations. One viable opportunity the ALT can incorporate, is the addition of a sustainable forum and conference center. With a community-oriented mind, Vista Wellness will provide a multitude of spaces for businesses and individuals to retreat while partaking in recreational activities. Vista Wellness is designed to be low impact with features such as a living roof and LEED certification. Using a promotional commercial and an intricate model, using state of the art construction supplies, we are able to convey the need for this addition to the Glenview property.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences, Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes
Year: 2018
Authors: Kimberly Kehr
, Matthew Syke
, Thomas Szabo