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Capstone Projects

Analysis of common water sampling techniques used to assess lake trophic state

Sat, 12/05/2015 - 00:21
Abstract: Volunteer lake management programs (VLMPs) across the country employ different surface water sampling techniques to establish long-term trends in nutrient availability and trophic state. The three most common techniques are a surface grab (SG), 2m integrated tube sampler (IT), and a discrete sampler, such as a Van Dorn or Kemmerer bottle deployed to a depth of 1.5m (DD). These various sampling techniques vary not only in depth, but also in cost and ease of use. The objectives of my study are to 1) determine if there is a statistical difference in chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and total phosphorus (TP) concentration obtained between the three different sampling techniques, 2) determine if the treatment effect (sampling device) varies over time, 3) determine which method has the least amount of variability, and 4) determine if sampling technique ultimately influences trophic state classification. The study was conducted on Upper St. Regis Lake, Paul Smiths, New York. I collected 10 samples from the lake using the three different techniques during the months of June – August, 2015. I found a significant difference in chlorophyll-a concentration between sampling techniques during June and July, and during the month of July for TP. The three sampling techniques yielded similar variability for chlorophyll-a but significantly different variability for TP. Ultimately, the trophic status rating for Upper St. Regis was not effected by sampling technique. My study suggests that VLMP should utilize a SG or IT rather than a costly DD sampler.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences
Year: 2015
Authors: Hunter Favreau

Environmental Factors Influencing the Establishment of Moss Species in the Elevator Shaft on Whiteface Mountain: A Descriptive Study

Wed, 12/02/2015 - 15:19
Abstract: The moss species growing in the elevator shaft on Whiteface Mountain have not yet been identified and little is known on the environmental conditions in which they exist. Light, moisture, substrate pH, and temperature play vital roles in the establishment and reproduction of moss. In the summer of 2015 eight moss species, present only in their gametophyte generation, were identified in the shaft. Four of these species are known to exist on the mountain outside of the elevator shaft. Temperature and relative humidity were measured to represent the conditions of the shaft, whereas available light, moisture, and substrate pH were measured with each colony. Temperature and humidity became more stable further into the shaft, similar to that of a cave environment. In addition, temperature peaked during the hours the elevator was in operation. Light, moisture, and substrate pH of each species were not strongly correlated with colony area. Most colonies were found to be growing on a type of sediment, rather than directly on the granite wall of the shaft. The pH of these substrates ranged between 6.68 and 8.99. The influx of tourists on Whiteface between May and October may play a vital role in the establishment of these species. The elevator may provide air circulation within the shaft and the electric lights omit the radiation necessary for the mosses survival. There is a 6 month period with possibly no light source or circulation of air. Further research should document these changes in environmental conditions during this period.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies
Year: 2015
Authors: Danica R. Maloney

Opportunity Cost of Common Core Development: Analysis of Course Preparation in the Fall Mountain school system and the Saranac Lake school systems

Fri, 12/05/2014 - 13:44
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the cost to a school of adopting the Common Core State Standards through the reallocation of a teacher’s time. This study compares two similarly sized school districts, Fall Mountain Regional and Saranac Lake Central. To obtain the information to do this study a survey was comprised and distributed to the teachers of the two school districts. The data was then used to determine the average cost for a teacher to redo their lesson plans to accommodate the new Common Core, and the opinions they have on the effectiveness of the Common Core State Standards, among other statistical data as a result of the aforementioned survey. The data will then be used to do a comparison of the two school districts to see how the Common Core has affected schools in different states and areas. Based on the results of this study a discussion will be made and recommendations for the future proposed.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2014
Authors: James Chamberlain

Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks An analysis of two competitors

Sat, 12/06/2014 - 12:18
Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this research is to find out exactly what the difference is between Dunkin Donuts and Starbucks. It attempts to show how the companies are run differently, as well as illustrating aspects that are not visible to the public. This research will include how the employees are treated differently along with what company is more popular with college students. Surveys will be sent out to Paul Smith’s College students, faculty and staff. Once the data is collected it will be analyzed to determine what company people choose more often and why. The data that is collected for this project will come from primary and secondary sources.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Business Management and Entrepreneurial Studies
Year: 2014
File Attachments: capstoneproject.docx
Authors: Rebecca Raffan

Ethan Kerr's Capstone

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 21:12
Abstract: Garlic
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ethan Kerr

A Taste of the Sustainable Sea

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 12:08
Abstract: A Taste of the Sustainable Sea is a capstone project revolving around the topic Sustainable Seafood. We were asked to pick topics out of hat and from there on a $300 budget create a menu to our liking and serve to no more than twenty people. This particular project was a cold dinner, served minimalist style, to ten people. Each course was about two to four bites each giving the customer a "taste" of everything. Inside of this project, you will find costing, recipes, front and back of the house descriptions, pictures and the lit review. Sustainable Seafood is a new and upcoming topic that will only revolve more over time.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Emily Bertora

Alpine Ecosystems on Ski Area Summits in the Northeast: A Best Management Practices Manual

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 15:19
Abstract: Over the past half a century, anthropogenic climate change has triggered temperatures in the northeastern United States to rise. This increase has led to decreased winter precipitation and a longer annual growing season. Species found in upland/montane habitats on the southern edge of their range limits are particularly threatened by these changes. Warmer temperatures have allowed larger woody plants to advance up mountain slopes, entering the habitat of these fragile species. In the next decade, we will witness a complete disappearance of alpine flora from several locations across the northeast including Whiteface in New York, Sugarloaf in Maine and Mount Mansfield in Vermont. Managers of ski resorts can therefore play an important role in promoting the continued persistence of high-altitude flora and fauna through carefully considered management decisions can also serve to promote the reputation of the ski industry as stewards of mountaintop ecosystems. Doing so will allow for continued study of the species that exist within these communities, the protection of biodiversity, and increased revenue for the resort itself through elevated public image and mountain-top tourism. To help begin these conservation efforts, we have created a best management practice (BMP) manual to guide ski area managers in making these developments. It includes techniques for sustainable slope, soil, vegetation and wildlife management, erosion control, artificial snow production, and ski slope construction and design. Also included are marketing techniques and an overview of the economic viability of the practices outlined in this manual.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Pali Gelsomini, Dylan Randall