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Capstone Projects

Draft Horse Sustainability Presentations: The effectiveness of presentations on draft animal power at the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival

Fri, 12/06/2013 - 12:53
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College has been putting on draft horse presentations for the public for many years but until now it was unknown how effective these were in education of the audience in topics of the interest. During the 2013 Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival, a series of demonstrations and presentations were conducted for the public. Surveys of those in attendance have now given us information on how far people are traveling, what their prior experience is, what they want to learn, and how they want to learn it. From this information we wish to gauge attendees’ response to draft animals and their uses.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
Authors: Alexandria Barner, Jacob Shultz

Green Roof Technologies in Adirondack Wilderness Areas

Fri, 04/26/2013 - 11:01
Abstract: Wilderness is qualified by two main characteristics: naturalness and solitude. To enhance these characteristics, many things are excluded from wilderness areas including roads, motorized vehicles and human-made structures of any kind. However some argue there needs to be greater consideration to structures that are a regional legacy and hold considerable historical significance. The Adirondack lean-to is a well-known entity associated with the Adirondack Park but much debate exists over whether or not such structures should be allowed in wilderness areas. The addition of green roofs to lean-tos can possibly mediate the humanness of these structures and produce a three-fold benefit. First, green roofs increase the naturalness of the lean-to. Second, they provide a model for naturalness and sustainability. Third, green roofs on lean-tos provide an additional benefit by lowering, however modestly, the impact of these structures on the natural environment. This qualitative study conducted a series of interviews to examine the feasibility and gauge the receptivity of stakeholders to this idea. Identified themes included the maintenance required to keep up the roofs, the cost and labor of installation and their longevity. Additional themes included the perceived lack of benefits, cultural and historical significance as well as the possibility of green-roofed lean-tos to provide an educational benefit. The data suggest that the benefits associated with green roofs on lean-tos may outweigh the cost of their installation. The naturalness of the green roof on the lean-t may thus offset the “unnaturalness” of the structures themselves to the degree that lean-tos may be perceived as more conforming to wilderness areas. This study concludes that further research is needed into the technical aspects of green roof construction including the amount of maintenance required and the use of wilderness compliant materials. The interest in green-roofed lean-tos appears to exist and with additional technical data it may be possible to take the next step.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
Authors: Alison Liedkie

A Study of Adaptive Skiing and Snowboarding Accomodations

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 20:05
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to observe, analyze and numerically evaluate a total of six ski resorts based on their degree of facilitation for people with both physical and cognitive disabilities that wish to participate in adaptive skiing and snowboarding. The outcome of this study was to discover themes that are common among different resorts. This study had a focus on ski resorts located in the Northeast, specifically New York and Vermont. The Adaptive Sports Center (ASC) located at Crested Butte Mountain Resort, Colorado is a nationally recognized organization, and was held as the standard for this study. The operational techniques and strategies being used at the ASC at Crested Butte were evaluated alongside those in New York and Vermont to further understand the degree of facilitation currently provided for this user group. The resorts located in New York State that were observed are Whiteface Mountain and Gore Mountain. The resort locations in the State of Vermont were the Smuggler’s Notch Adaptive Program at Smuggler’s Notch Resort, Killington Resort at Pico Mountain, and Sugarbush Resort, which both operate under Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports. The outcome of this study can be used by program directors at ski resorts that offer adaptive program in order to better accommodate for adaptive skiers and snowboarders.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
File Attachments: final capstone.doc
Authors: Daniel Lewis

The Redevelopment of the Hiking Treks of BSA Camp Russell of the Revolutionary Trails Council

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 09:48
Abstract: High Adventure Programs are extremely important for Boy Scouts of America Councils. These programs do everything from hiking, biking, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, and rock climbing. Each council has their own unique programs specifically made for their area. For Camp Russell of White Lake, NY, redevelopment for part of their High Adventure Program is needed due to the being out of date: The Hiking Treks. New treks will be created with the help of trail mapping with a GPS unit, the ArcMap program, and online research. When all the data is collected, Camp Russell will be supplied with a map that shows many hiking trails within a reasonable driving distance. With this map, a manual will be created that zooms in to each hiking area that has the statistics of each hike. This map can be used by the Camp Russell staff for years to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Final_Withey.docx
Authors: Richard J. Withey

The Root of The Problem

Wed, 12/05/2012 - 15:35
Abstract: Abstract The local food movement is a leading trend in the restaurant industry. Paul Smith’s College utilizes multiple culinary labs and an on-site restaurant. Considering the industry trend and the amount of produce used on a daily basis, how can we better utilize our produce? This study seeks to determine if a root cellar could help increase the shelf life of vegetables for the culinary labs and St. Regis Café. Invoices of vegetable orders from vendors (specifically Sysco) will be gathered and analyzed. The data collected will be used to determine the feasibility of methods related to vegetable preservation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone Final
Authors: Christian Hunter

Determining the Authenticity in Ethnic Cuisines

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 21:10
Abstract: The United States is often referred to as a melting pot. As many cultures have melded together, so have their cuisines. In recent years, ethnic cuisines’ demand has grown steadily and the market has become saturated with restaurants claiming to be authentic. With this popularity of ethnic foods in the United States, a demand for increased authenticity in ethnic restaurants is higher than ever. However, what makes an ethnic restaurant authentic? The purpose of this study is to look at the opinions of both consumers and industry professionals to find what each group finds important when determining authenticity. Research was done via online surveys sent to culinary professionals working in ethnic restaurants and diners of ethnic restaurants to determine what each population deemed most important when preparing ethnic food and when choosing an ethnic restaurant. The outcome of this study can be used by any person looking to open an authentic ethnic restaurant or looking to improve on their already existing restaurant.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Blue Swan Otto

Vertical Gardens

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 21:08
Abstract: Vertical gardens have the potential to be both functional and serve as decoration in the modern restaurant. This Capstone will study vertical gardens and restaurants in the United Sates that currently have vertical gardens, in an effort to determine if vertical gardens could be a profitable investment for the modern restaurant, if vertical gardens are practical for restaurants to have and maintain, and if the vertical garden could serve as a decoration to the restaurants’ guests. Methods will include interviewing chefs and owners of these restaurants and surveying restaurant patrons to measure the amount of value that the restaurant customer places on the idea of vertical gardens in restaurants. The results will prove whether or not the idea of a vertical garden in the restaurant is cost effective, while also providing decoration in the dining room and enhancing the customer experience. Vertical gardens are an integral part of the fresh, local food movement. It is incredibly important for students and professionals alike, to study this important new trend in the industry, especially as the fresh food movement is currently trending.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: FINAL.docx
Authors: Kayla Saenz

You Are What You Eat

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 18:12
Abstract: Food plays a huge role for all living organisms. The focus and purpose of this research is to determine if Paul Smith’s College students are getting the nutrients they need to perform well in school. Students need nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals that will help fuel the mind and body. These nutrients can have a tremendous effect on how the body’s behavior, specifically how it copes with stress and memory. The data was collected by observing the food choices offered in the Paul Smith’s College dining hall. It benefits students to have a balanced meal to nourish the mind and body. Offering healthy choices and promoting a balanced diet will benefit the students at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: You are what you eat
Authors: Courtney Sypher

Women vs. Men Becoming Executive Chefs

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 17:30
Abstract: Currently culinary school enrollment nationwide is about even between male and female students but there is a gap when it comes to being an executive chef, women only account for 10% of executive chefs. The purpose of this project is to study this gap between men and women in the culinary field and also to see what might be causing these gaps and what other jobs the women have found. Surveys will be given to Paul Smith’s alumni with a four year culinary degree. The survey will find out what type of students they were and what jobs they had wanted and what jobs they have had. The male and female responses will then be compared to each other to see if there are gaps between the information.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Jordan Williams

From Garden to School: Future Trend Prediction study of school lunches and the edible schoolyard, Kitchen Garden Project, and Let’s Move! Programs.

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 16:59
Abstract: The ‘Edible Schoolyard’ movement is driving schools towards offering freshly grown produce into their school lunch programs. The Edible Schoolyard aims to provide fresh produce with learning experiences in order to encourage school children to eat healthy and make good decisions about what they eat. An edible schoolyard can be utilized as a major development for school systems, especially in the United States where the growing rates of obesity in our children is still increasing. The purpose of this study was to explore the plausibility of a school system adapting the edible schoolyard or even similar program such as: Kitchen Garden Project and Let’s Move!. A survey was used to measure and compare the responses on if the edible schoolyard is possible for a school system to incorporate. The outcome of this survey can be used to persuade schools into deciding whether they think it’s a good idea to adapt the program into their school system, or even deciding if it’s worth implementing some aspects of the edible schoolyard for their schools.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final23.docx
Authors: Barbara Sanchez