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Capstone Projects

Management Plan to Increase Nesting Success of Northern Pintails (Anas acuta) in the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 17:36
Abstract: Once one of the most abundant ducks in North America, northern pintails have significantly declined since the 1960s when populations reached about 10 million. Over the past 40 years they have declined 78%, or about 2.4% per year between 1966 and 2015, due to expanding agricultural activity in their prairie pothole breeding grounds. In 2009 that the pintail population was estimated at 3.2 million, which is substantially below the 5.6 million population goal set by the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. The northern pintail population is substantially impacted by drought; and a loss of grasslands and wetland habitat in the prairie pothole region. Without proper breeding habitat pintails migrate further north to the Artic lowland tundra, where wetland conditions are more stable. However, when large numbers breed in these regions fewer young are produced. As a result, the prairies are where the fate of the pintail population lies. Throughout North America the northern pintail is listed as a migratory bird species where it is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and receives some management under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. In North Dakota, the northern pintail is listed as a level II species of concern and there it receives management under the State Wildlife Action Plan, but because it is only a level II species it does not receive the management until all actions are covered for level I species. However, due to the species large geographic range and large worldwide population estimate it is listed as a species of Least Concern with a declining population on the International Union for Conservation of Species (IUCN) Red List of threatened species. The goals of this plan are to increase the abundance and distribution of northern pintails in North Dakota over the next 10 years and to provide information that leads to greater public involvement for the management of the species in North Dakota. The objectives to achieve these goals include: mitigation of agricultural impacts on nests, reductions of egg, hatchling, and hen predation via predator exclusion, increase in nesting habitat via Farm Bill practices and State Wildlife Grants, and the education of the public about the nesting requirements of northern pintails and the potential impacts of agriculture as well management practices to avoid these impacts. Based on population modeling, egg, hatchling, and hen survival is the key factor to focus on when managing for this species. An increase of about 50% nest success (eggs) and reduced predation rate on hatchlings and hens should result in a positive population trend, yielding a population of 6.7 million in 10 years, with a greater than 50% increase being more favorable to the overall goals and objectives. Northern pintails are a game species that needs management action in breeding areas to ensure their survival and growth for the enjoyment of current and future generations.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2018
Authors: Joseph K Roberts

Special Topic: An Investigation of Long Term Monitoring of Fishes in Two Aquatic Ecosystems

Fri, 05/11/2018 - 10:06
Abstract: Lower St. Regis Lake Abstract Long-term ecological research is important in understanding how fish communities change over time. The objective of this study was to determine how fish communities in Lower St. Regis Lake have changed. From 2004 - 2017 fisheries students at Paul Smith’s College have conducted lake surveys on Lower St. Regis Lake using standardized sampling protocols. This study showed shifts in fish community composition, changes in size structure, and variable body condition. As Lower St. Regis Lake changes, continued long-term ecological research will provide an opportunity for students monitor and study factors that may be effecting fish populations and communities. Smitty Creek Abstract Long term ecological monitoring of streams provides an effective means to evaluate changing habitat conditions on fish population dynamics. Our objective was to use long-term data from four tributaries in Smitty Creek Watershed to explore the relationship of age-0 brook trout densities to regional weather conditions. Catch data of age 0 brook trout was collected during the fall from 2004 to 2017. Average monthly precipitation and temperature data was taken from the Lake Clear regional weather station. Of four streams, Little Aldo showed correlation of age-0 brook trout with the precipitation and temperature data. Future work should include improved instrumentation within the reaches and the use of site-specific data.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Final Capstone West St. Cyr
Authors: Taylor West, Joe St. Cyr

A study of how different liquids affect the fermentation process in breads.

Sun, 05/07/2017 - 14:41
Abstract: We all know that different liquids have different densities and will affect any product you are making in a unique way than the other. But how exactly do different liquids affect the fermentation of yeast in a bread dough. In this paper, I will go on to tell you about five different liquids and the type of bread I chose to use for the trials. I will also go into why I chose that type of bread and touch on the history of it.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking and Pastry Arts, Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
Authors: Kassede Andriola

Bread: Does the Type of Milk Used Affect the Production

Sat, 12/09/2017 - 12:25
Abstract: No abstract
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Capstone Final Paper.docx
Authors: Jenna Griffo

How changing the variables of flour, water, and fermentation temperature in bread making affects the final product.

Sat, 04/29/2017 - 12:57
Abstract: During my time at Paul Smith’s College, I was taught three different bread making processes all focusing on different variables and techniques. Each method was taught by a different chef throughout the course of my freshman, sophomore, and junior year labs. These three methods are all vastly different in their own way, leading me to wonder which method would in fact yield the best results. I decided to test this theory by using the exact same recipe for all three methods, only changing the variable and proofing process of each, to specifically match what these three chefs had taught me.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Research Paper , Research Poster
Authors: Emmalee Sturtevant

Are products from local bakeries worth the cost compared to less expensive, mass produced products?

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 13:45
Abstract: My goal was to find out what matters the most to people when purchasing products while grocery shopping. I also wanted to see if small bakeries still have a foot to stand on when competing against big businesses that mass produce their products. So, I decided to compare freshly baked products to pre-packaged products by having the general public participate in a taste comparison.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Final Project.docx , Poster.pptx
Authors: Brittany Markee

Do Different Oven Types Effect the Outcome of Various Baked Goods?

Tue, 05/02/2017 - 13:41
Abstract: In order to assess if different oven types effect the outcome of baked goods, I will take four recipes and bake them separately in three ovens: convection, deck and conventional oven. In order to keep every single variable the same, aside from the oven, I will mix the four different recipes individually in a large batch. This will ensure that the only variable effecting the outcome of the products, is the oven types. I will look at a baguette, a cupcake, a cookie and a pate a choux recipe. These four recipes will demonstrate various outcomes of spreading, rising, crust development and even baking.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Final Capstone Project
Authors: Mary Calabrese

Do customers prefer the taste of homemade or mass produced cheese in baked products?

Fri, 05/05/2017 - 20:48
Abstract: To get results from the public, I put together a blind tasting of three different products showcasing cheeses in an assortment. Each of the products looked the same, with the same components; the only difference were the cheeses used to accompany the breads.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jessica Churchill
Fri, 05/05/2017 - 20:48
Abstract: To get results from the public, I put together a blind tasting of three different products showcasing cheeses in an assortment. Each of the products looked the same, with the same components; the only difference were the cheeses used to accompany the breads.
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Literary Rights:
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2017
File Attachments: capstone. final paper.docx
Authors: Jessica Churchill

Comparison of Cyprinid Composition and Abundance in Relation to Microhabitat Characteristics within Heron Marsh, in the Adirondack Park, NY

Mon, 04/24/2017 - 15:47
Abstract: Cyprinids are susceptible to local, watershed, and regional extirpation within the United States. Habitat alterations, non-indigenous species introductions, changes in water quality, and anthropogenic barriers have resulted in a decrease in overall cyprinid biodiversity. The objectives of this study are (1) to establish baseline water quality characteristics among sites in summer and fall, 2016, (2) to compare minnow densities to percent macrophyte cover among trap sites for common species, and (3) to compare 2016 minnow densities by species and combined with 2014 and 2012 density estimates. Heron Marsh is a shallow marsh located with the Adirondack Park, NY, that supports a wide variety of fishes in the Cyprinidae family. Baseline water quality was collected using an YSI meter, cyprinid densities were estimated using galvanized steel minnow traps, and macrophyte cover data was estimated using a 21-point grid system for trap sites within the marsh. Water quality monitoring will help assess changes in the marsh over time due to global warming. More minnow trap sites must be established to determine if there is a relationship between macrophyte cover and cyprinid abundance. This will allow the statistical power of our tests to become robust to assumptions that were otherwise violated. Cyprinid biodiversity and abundance were highest amongst the upper region of the marsh for most years. This suggests that the upper region of the marsh may be a sanctuary or refuge for certain cyprinid species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2017
File Attachments: Kuryla_Capstone paper.docx
Authors: Jake E Kuryla