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Capstone Projects

Comparison of Skid Trail Soil and Adjacent Undisturbed Forest Soil Physical Properties Over a Chronosequence in Vermont

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 19:04
Abstract: The effects of harvesting on forest soil physical properties are visually noticeable on soils where equipment has operated. The effects of equipment passes on forest soils of the Northeastern United States are not well documented. Results from such investigations are less telling when the resilience of forest soils over time is not measured. In an attempt to provide insight, single equipment pass skid trails at two harvest sites (1991 and 2010) meeting similar criteria were sampled. Bulk density (BD), macroporosity, microporosity, total porosity, and strength of skid trial soils and adjacent undisturbed forest soils were measured at each site. The results showed a P-value of 0.019 between soil bulk density, time since harvest, and disturbance type. The 1991 site has resilient soil, as skid trial soil properties were not significantly different than the undisturbed soil properties 20 years later. At the 2010 site, skid trail soil properties were significantly different than undisturbed soil. The goal is that this study be used in conjunction with previous research to aid Northeastern forest managers in determining how to remove wood over successive treatments. The data suggests that soil physical properties are not permanently altered after single equipment passes at the two study sites.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Project 2nd Draft.docx
Authors: Steve Handfield, Daniel Kelting

Gauging Public Perception towards Visitor Impact as well as a Hypothetical Recreation Permit for the Adirondack State Park, New York

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 20:19
Abstract: Human impact upon natural resources can have negative environmental and social impacts. A questionnaire was given out at Marcy Dam to determine whether or not the public perceived negative impacts from visitor use, in particular mountain recreation areas. Participants were also questioned about a hypothetical permit which could introduce a new form of management within impacted areas. Surveys were then analyzed to see how the public had responded to heavily impacted areas and the idea of a recreation permit. Results were displayed in pie chart form to represent public perceptions and views. From the surveyed participants, it was discovered that the majority of people (85%), saw negative impacts in popular recreation areas. The majority of participants (64%), also expressed they would not be willing to accept a recreation permit for use in certain areas.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone_Final Draft.docx
Authors: Kyle Leech

Effects of Snow on GPS Accuracy in Forest Environments

Wed, 04/18/2012 - 15:54
Abstract: Abstract Global Positioning Systems, or GPS, have become an indispensable aspect of modern life, used in everyday situations and is a vital component of many occupations, including forestry and natural resources. With increased GPS accuracy, a forester is able to better locate boundaries and geographic or cultural features beneath forest canopy, leading to increased productivity. In the terms of forestry practices, decreased accuracy can cause errors which could lead to financial or physical loss of resources. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of canopy snow on the accuracy of commercially available, recreation grade GPS units which are suitable for forestry use. The effect of snow on canopy closure was tested through the photographic examination of pre and post snow canopy conditions. GPS accuracy was determined by taking averaged GPS measurements alongside the photo measurements. These were points were compared to previously established coordinates derived from a survey traverse. The results showed that snow did affect the canopy closure of the test forest, yet any correlation between GPS accuracy and increased canopy closure was found to be inconclusive.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Snyder2012.pdf
Authors: Rand J. Snyder