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Capstone Projects

Reintroduction Feasibility of the Adirondack Wolf

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 11:14
Abstract: Mammalian carnivores are increasingly the focus of reintroduction attempts in areas from which they have been extirpated by historic persecution. The gray wolf (Canis Lupus) has been one of the most successful examples of large carnivore reintroduction around the world. The purpose of the study is to determine whether or not it is possible to successfully reintroduce the gray wolf into the Adirondack Park environment. Static and dynamic spatial geographical models were used to evaluate whether a proposed wolf reintroduction to the Adirondack Park is feasible. Ecological, economic, and sociopolitical aspects are limiting factors that are analyzed to determine if the reintroduction is structurally possible for the park.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Samuel Burnham , Christopher Broccoli , Zach Long, Tyler Twichell

Tiny Houses: A Step Toward Conserving Natural Resources

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 13:45
Abstract: This project examines the potential to downsize America’s current living style in efforts to conserve natural resources and adapt to the changing world. The average home has increased to an excessive size over the years. As a result, abundant amounts of timber are desired, pollution is produced, and homeowners are buried in financial debt. A possible relief to these issues is the tiny home . Many tiny house advocates allegedly stated these structures require fewer materials to construct, lessening the need for natural resources. To confirm these ideas, a study was implemented through extensive research on small living, followed by a survey and the construction of a tiny house model. The results showed many American’s with large homes cannot justify the need for the excess space. Therefore, downsized to a tiny house may be a good choice for many citizens. These structures proved to require fewer materials at a more cost efficient price. So if the tiny house is both livable and affordable, what does this mean for the future of the tiny house?
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone NRS 495
Authors: Tim Baker, Falon Neske

PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER IN FLORIDA

Fri, 05/08/2015 - 16:16
Abstract: For the future, it is now essential to diversify energy sources. The sun is not an alternative energy source; continued use of fossil fuels should be considered the alternative source. Despite the amount of sun received by the Florida peninsula, solar energy is not currently used to its fullest advantage. Florida can invest in Photovoltaic systems and use the sun for an advantage. Solar energy offers power without the need to burn fossil fuels. In its basic form, it needs no distribution grid because it comes down from the sun. Literature indicates Florida could be in the top three states, within the United States, to produce solar energy.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nathaniel Flynn

Presence and Abundance of Microplastics within Flowing Waters of Private, Wilderness, and Other Forest Preserve Lands of the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 16:26
Abstract: Microplastic sampling was conducted at thirteen locations throughout the water bodies of the Northern Adirondack Region. Plastics were found at all thirteen sites, which were categorized by the impact level of human development. Any particle less than 5mm can be defined as a microplastic particle. Microscopic plastics can be found in a variety of chemical cleaners, clothing fabrics, and concrete solutions. Storm water drainage systems and wastewater treatment plants are confirmed sources of microplastic pollution, which carry pollutants into our rivers, lakes, and streams. Ingestion of microplastic particles can lead to many distinctive threats, including biological and physical abnormalities, while possibly leading to bioaccumulation and biomagnification throughout the food web. Future practices for management and prevention of microplastic pollutants in the Adirondacks is critical for environmental protection, while also portraying a worldly view of an overlooked human induced issue.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Patrick Colern, Sinjin Larson

Craft Beer Distribution

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 12:22
Abstract: Craft beer is distributed in many different places. The purpose of this research is to show how the breweries want to expand on getting out more and different varieties of beers to be sold outside of breweries. This study will use case interviews with existing craft brewers. Included in the interviews will be inquiries on where and why the beer is distributed to certain distribuitors that they have selected. Of the five breweries interviewed, it will explore and give insight on how well the beer is distributed. Beer distribution is huge for breweries and to be able to keep up with what is popularity and explore new varieties will help show if the company is going to be profitable or not.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: beer project.docx
Authors: Kacie McKeown

Extracurricular Activities and Academic Success

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 12:20
Abstract: This report investigates whether student activities has an impact on academic success. The student activities were broken into five categories: on campus clubs and organizations, off campus clubs and organizations, team sports, independent athletics, and jobs. While this subject has been studied before, results tend to differ widely due to college type or sample size. In order to study this on Paul Smith’s College campus, a survey was sent to students containing questions regarding their GPA and in what activities from the five categories they regularly participated. There were 120 responses to the survey. Out of those 120 students, 83 percent reported that they did participate in student activities. Of that 83 percent, 76 percent of students stated that they felt extracurricular activities had helped improve their performance in their academic studies. Of the 83 percent, 45 percent had a 3.5 to 4.0 GPA. While this does seem to support that extracurricular activities has a positive effect on academics, it is uncertain whether students who are more determined and academically inclined are the ones more likely to do extracurricular activities. That would be a topic for further study.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Melissa Tiedt

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities at the Paul Smith’s College VIC

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 15:41
Abstract: The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) says that public facilities, including such places as parks and recreation trails need to be accessible to everyone., Barnum Brook Trail at the Visitor's Interpretive Center (VIC) is considered a mobility challenged accessible trail. Researching other parks throughout the United States can help determine if making this trail at the VIC accessible for persons with a number of disabilities will be beneficial. The other trails will help define who and how big the potential market is for accessible trails. These trails can show us different aspects that exist at other parks, such as Braille signage, ramps and lifts, that we could bring to the Barnum Brook trail and the rest of the VIC. Current such trails include John Dillon Park in upstate New York, in Colorado: Coyote Valley Trails, Sprague Lake, and Lily Lake, Arlington Lions Club Park in Florida, and Papago Park in Arizona. Interviewing people in the surrounding area including those that are providing services to persons with different disabilities at ARC and North Star Industries can help determine if groups of people would be willing to come spend a day enjoying the VIC facilities and trails.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stacy Cavanaugh

Alpine Ecosystems on Ski Area Summits in the Northeast: A Best Management Practices Manual

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 15:19
Abstract: Over the past half a century, anthropogenic climate change has triggered temperatures in the northeastern United States to rise. This increase has led to decreased winter precipitation and a longer annual growing season. Species found in upland/montane habitats on the southern edge of their range limits are particularly threatened by these changes. Warmer temperatures have allowed larger woody plants to advance up mountain slopes, entering the habitat of these fragile species. In the next decade, we will witness a complete disappearance of alpine flora from several locations across the northeast including Whiteface in New York, Sugarloaf in Maine and Mount Mansfield in Vermont. Managers of ski resorts can therefore play an important role in promoting the continued persistence of high-altitude flora and fauna through carefully considered management decisions can also serve to promote the reputation of the ski industry as stewards of mountaintop ecosystems. Doing so will allow for continued study of the species that exist within these communities, the protection of biodiversity, and increased revenue for the resort itself through elevated public image and mountain-top tourism. To help begin these conservation efforts, we have created a best management practice (BMP) manual to guide ski area managers in making these developments. It includes techniques for sustainable slope, soil, vegetation and wildlife management, erosion control, artificial snow production, and ski slope construction and design. Also included are marketing techniques and an overview of the economic viability of the practices outlined in this manual.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Pali Gelsomini, Dylan Randall

Possible Limiting Soil Macro-Nutrients of Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) Growth in an Adirondack Hardwood Stand

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 08:46
Abstract: Sugar maple (Acer Saccharum) has been in decline for the past few decades. Several studies have been done throughout parts of Canada and New England to determine what is limiting sugar maple growth. By mimicking one of these studies, I conducted a fertility study to show correlations between soil fertility and three different measures of tree growth. I selected 40 dominant sugar maple trees in a hardwood stand in the Adirondack Park in northern New York to sample. I collected two increment cores from each tree, measured the DBH and calculated basal area at each tree. I also collected mineral soil from the base of each tree that was sampled and tested its chemical properties and macronutrients that are most related to growth. I found weaker correlations between soil fertility and growth than my parent study had found. This may be because I didn’t have enough variation in my samples, measured growth or fertility in a way that wasn’t the most accurate, soil characteristics may not be limiting, or some soil characteristics may be co-limiting growth.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Capstone Report
Authors: Kevin Kenealy

Challenges Associated with Conservation Easements In the Adirondack Park and Recommendations for Improving the Process

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 13:11
Abstract: With conservation easements only becoming popular in the past 40 years, they are at the developmental stage where weaknesses start to become apparent as land starts to change hands from one generation to the next. It is important to find and correct these barriers to ensure these same problems do not occur in the next 40 years. My focus was performing research within the Adirondack State Park of New York. I utilized Semi-Structured Interviews (SSI) along with SSI guides to collect my data while using a sampling technique referred to as a snowball sampling approach. I interviewed two different categories of conservation easement personal. 1. Land owner/manager with conservation easement on property 2.Agency Workers from The Nature Conservancy and the New York State Department of Environmental. I then used emergent themes to reveal the discrepancies or weaknesses in current conservation easements along with their common strengths. From there I used (S.W.O.T) Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis to provide recommendations for policy revising.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Capstone Final Draft.docx
Authors: Timothy Kempf