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Capstone Projects

Sustaing Fisher Populations Through the Prevention of Unintentional Trapping

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 11:30
Abstract: Fishers (Martes pennanti) are medium-sized carnivores in the weasel family. They prefer forests with a large amount of canopy and understory cover. Since fishers have delayed implantation they are pregnant basically all year long giving them a low reproductive rate. Fisher populations were decimated in the 1800’s to the early 1900’s through unmanaged trapping and severe habitat modification. Changes in land use patterns and reintroduction efforts in Pennsylvania have allowed the fisher to once again inhabit the state. In order to sustain and further expand the population a management plan is needed; taking into consideration ecological, economic, and socio-cultural influences. The overall goal of this plan is to sustain the current population of fisher through the prevention of unintentional trapping. The objectives of this plan are 1) Monitor fisher demographic characteristics and distribution throughout the state every other year through the course of this plan, 2) Reduce accidental harvest/ death 80% during Pennsylvania trapping seasons within 3 years. Courses of action include the gathering of demographic information through radiotelemetry and multiple forms of habitat sampling. Altering current trapping regulations in areas where there is a high abundance of fisher and further educating trappers on best management trapping practices.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Roland Granata

Providing youth sportsmen and disabled veterans with designated hunting areas through the enactment of the New York State eastern cottontail management plan

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 14:26
Abstract: The eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) is considered to be one of the most widely distributed cottontail in North America and one of the most popular game animals within the United States. Millions of hours each year are spent hunting cottontails as a recreational sport. While there are designated hunting areas for youth sportsmen and disabled veterans for other game species of New York State such as the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), there are no such designated hunting areas designed specifically for eastern cottontails. Through cooperation of stakeholders such as private land owners and the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), we aim to establish designated hunting areas specifically for youth sportsmen and disabled veterans to provide them with the opportunity of enjoying recreational hunting and the enjoyment of the great outdoors for present and future generations of New York State.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Cory Douglass

Management Plan to Increase and Stabilize the Population of Northern Bobwhites (Colinus virginanus) in the State of Illinois

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 22:40
Abstract: Northern Bobwhite habitat has continuously declined because a variety of factors, including growth in agricultural areas, increase in monocultures, expansion of urbanization, and natural succession. Due to these and other factors, the population of Northern Bobwhites across the United States is decreasing, although there are few with increasing populations. Northern Bobwhites have a strong economic benefit, since they are a game species and have been hunted for the past couple centuries. Northern Bobwhites were overexploited, and have not rebounded to its previous status. There have been many management practices and programs within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Agency Program to increase the amount of suitable habitat of Northern Bobwhites. The goal of this management plan is to increase and stabilize the population of Northern Bobwhites in Illinois. To achieve this goal, actions such as closing the natural history knowledge gap of Northern Bobwhites, increasing the habitat through various USDA Farm Agency Programs, and increasing the survival of Northern Bobwhites in different stages are needed.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Management Plan Revise.docx
Authors: Jenna Daub

A Management Plan for Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) in the Northern Rocky Mountains

Mon, 05/06/2013 - 17:30
Abstract: Gray wolves (Canis lupus) in the Northern Rocky Mountains have increased rapidly from 29 individuals in 1995 to over 1600 in 2012. Conflicts between humans and wolves are likely to increase as wolves spread to new areas. The current management of gray wolves by state wildlife agencies is not adequate to reduce human-wolf conflicts. A different approach to wolf management must be taken; this management plan attempts to address several issues regarding gray wolf management. The majority of the public supports wolf conservation, and further actions must be taken to ensure the long term viability of gray wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains. This management plan recommends the increased funding and implementation of non-lethal control methods to reduce depredations, especially the use of guard dogs and fladry. The cost and efficacy of several non-lethal control methods is assessed. This management plan recommends that lethal control of wolves be discontinued as lethal control is expensive, not effective, and controversial. This management plan recommends education to increase the public support of gray wolves through educational programs at schools and distribution of educational brochures. This management plan recommends that gray wolf populations be higher than the minimum required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Genetic variability may decrease rapidly if populations are held at the minimum level, especially if migration between sub-populations is reduced. This management plan recommends that a minimum of 3 genetically-effective migrants occurs per generation between sub-populations to ensure adequate genetic variability. If implemented, the recommendations made in this management plan will be a major step towards ensuring the long-term viability of gray wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Andrew Martyn Antaya

Increasing and Protecting the Population of Canada Lynx (Lynx canadensis) In the State of Maine

Tue, 05/07/2013 - 12:16
Abstract: Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) was listed as a “threatened” species on March 24, 2000 (USFWS 2013). Canada lynx (hereby referred to as lynx) are a species known to trappers for their thick, long pelts. These pelts can be sold in the fur trade for on average about $175. They are highly sought after in areas where trapping is legal, but in Maine it is not legal to trap lynx. This management plan is going to work to achieve an increase in the population size of lynx in the state of Maine and to protect areas in Maine where there are current populations of lynx that are reproducing. The lynx is currently a threatened species, the USFWS on the Endangered Species Act, throughout its range due to it being a widely roaming organism. It is listed as a species of least concern according to the IUCN Red List. The goal of this plan is to achieve and maintain a sustainable population of Canada lynx in the state of Maine. The goal is going to be accomplished by three objectives. The first objective is to protect all areas of habitat in western and northeastern Maine with current reproducing populations of lynx for the next 10 years. The second objective is to manage areas of timber to establish more suitable habitat in northern Maine for the next 10 years. The third objective is to reduce the amount of incidentally harvested lynx in western and northeastern Maine by 25% each year for four years.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Brown - Submission2.docx
Authors: Heath A. Brown

Protecting and Monitoring the Population of Florida Manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) in Lee County, Florida

Thu, 05/09/2013 - 10:57
Abstract: The Florida manatee is a subspecies of the species West Indian Manatee. It has been listed as Endangered on the basis of a population that has been in decline since the 1800s in Florida. Although, the exact population of Florida manatees is not currently known, biologists have seen a gradual decrease in contrast to the past. This is due to factors such as: watercraft collisions, cold stress, Red Tide, and other human related mortalities. Manatees are protected by several laws and regulations. These include: the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Florida Manatee Sanctuary Act, and the Endangered Species Act. The goal of this management plan is to increase the Florida manatee population to a stable population and to maintain the population into the future. The objectives are to: investigate the distribution and status of Florida manatees in Lee County by conducting synoptic surveys twice every year; within five years, increase public awareness and education by 25%; within five years, increase the amount of protected and managed manatee habitat by 15%, and within five years, protect and enhance existing populations by identifying and minimizing causes of manatee injury, mortality, and disturbance by decreasing it by 20%.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Jordan Shypinka

Tasmanian Platypus Management Plan

Fri, 12/06/2013 - 01:12
Abstract: Platypuses are an iconic mammal endemic to Australia (Furlan et al. 2010). They are an integral part of biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems. They are the only living representative of a significant lineage of platypus-like animals with a 60 million year fossil history (Grant and Temple-Smith 2003). Platypuses are regularly seen in Tasmania and promote curiosity and interest. They directly benefit ecotourism. A number of businesses including sanctuaries, wildlife tours, restaurants, cafes, caravan parks and motels benefit from their popularity (Gust and Griffiths 2010). Freshwater resources are essential to sustaining human existence and as a result, anthropogenic activities have severely diminished the quality of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Physical alteration, habitat loss, water withdrawal, pollution, overexploitation, and the introduction of non-native species all have contributed to the decline in freshwater species (Revenga et al 2005).
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
File Attachments: final_Pritchard.pdf
Authors: Tori Pritchard

Draft Horse Sustainability Presentations: The effectiveness of presentations on draft animal power at the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival

Fri, 12/06/2013 - 12:53
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College has been putting on draft horse presentations for the public for many years but until now it was unknown how effective these were in education of the audience in topics of the interest. During the 2013 Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival, a series of demonstrations and presentations were conducted for the public. Surveys of those in attendance have now given us information on how far people are traveling, what their prior experience is, what they want to learn, and how they want to learn it. From this information we wish to gauge attendees’ response to draft animals and their uses.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
Authors: Alexandria Barner, Jacob Shultz

TripAdvisor reviews as an indicator of Relais and Chateaux experience fulfillment

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 17:08
Abstract: Social media can influence positive and negative customer expectations. The purpose of this inductive, qualitative, relational study is to determine how and if top-rated TripAdvisor reviewers should be given merit for their input, and why others care, compared to industry standards of a Relais and Chateaux rated experience in northeast destinations. A content analysis of TripAdvisor and the hotel sites will be studied to see if the responses represent Relais & Chateaux standard experiences or an un-realistic response. Customer responses, company history, its location, amenity information, mission statement, price of lodging will be indirectly observed and compared to Relais and Chateaux standards. This study can be of use to determine the effectiveness of ordinary guests, not industry experts, ability to judge an experience based on what a hotel stands for in a positive or negative manor to its ability to deliver a type of experience and their meet customers’ expectations.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Social Madness
Authors: Brandon May

Music Festival Management

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 21:59
Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this exploratory study is to determine the management skill set required for individuals seeking executive level management positions within the music festival industry. This study is being performed because of a lack of information specific to the music festival industry regarding important skill sets required to reach the executive level. A survey will be conducted with top level management in the music festival industry in order to determine which skills were most supportive in obtaining their top level positions. The specific management skills needed for the top level positions will be a combination of the opinion and personal experience of top level executives in the music festival industry. This study is applicable for individuals seeking to develop and refine the skills required in order to achieve an executive level position within the music festival industry.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Music Festival Management
Authors: Kristen Morse