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Capstone Projects

Potato

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 14:06
Abstract: **Summary of Portfolio** When we picked our topics out of the hat, with my result being Potato, I took a very literal approach. Potato was the star in all 3 dishes, with help from other flavors, the potato was allowed to shine. I chose the Papas Rellenas dish because it was right up my alley as a chef, something stuffed and deep fried, but also spoke to the heritage of the potato. Potato originated in Peru and this was a Peruvian Papas Rellenas. The Gnocchi was an easy choice because it was a dish I really enjoyed making and eating in Italy, when I studied Abroad. The first time I had the sage and butter sauce with sautéed Gnocchi, I knew it was my favorite. Not only because of the simplicity of the Sauce, but how clearly you tasted POTATO when you ate the dish. It was difficult to find a potato dish that also had a recipe that was acknowledged to produce decent product. I was staying away from sweet potato because it is not technically a potato. I read a lot of recipe reviews, things like potato tortes and truffles but with mixed opinions on how the outcome was taste / consistency etc. When I found the Super Spud Brownie, most reviews said it was moist and delicious and a solid recipe so I figured it would be a good desert.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Wills Ohrnberger

Ethan Kerr's Capstone

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 21:12
Abstract: Garlic
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ethan Kerr

A Taste of the Sustainable Sea

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 12:08
Abstract: A Taste of the Sustainable Sea is a capstone project revolving around the topic Sustainable Seafood. We were asked to pick topics out of hat and from there on a $300 budget create a menu to our liking and serve to no more than twenty people. This particular project was a cold dinner, served minimalist style, to ten people. Each course was about two to four bites each giving the customer a "taste" of everything. Inside of this project, you will find costing, recipes, front and back of the house descriptions, pictures and the lit review. Sustainable Seafood is a new and upcoming topic that will only revolve more over time.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Emily Bertora

Afternoon Tea

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 17:26
Abstract: After air and water, tea is the most commonly consumed substance on earth. This steeped plant matter has affected every facet of the world, from the Buddhist Moncks of China to the royal courts of Britain, and the front porch of many southern states in America. The wide spread love and consumption of tea has created great passion among its consumers. A passion so large, that this warm beverage became the first mass commodity and has been the center of many great scandals, from the opium wars to the Boston Tea party protest. This incredible influential liquid will be brought to life through the Afternoon Tea that will be held December second. This tea will share the history of tea with a small group of people through a carefully prepared dinning experience. The dinning room will be a representation of the rituals of the classic English tea ceremony and the menu will embody the impact tea has had on Japan and China.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jessie Husmann

Offal's and Less Popular Cuts

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 09:39
Abstract: The research question I develop and base my capstone project was based around the trend and concept of nose to tail dinning. I wanted to find out if using offal’s and second cuts of meat and could these items be suited for a family restaurant. I will also try to see if using offal’s and cross utilizing ingredients throughout the menu to cut down on waste, be cost effective and appeal to the guest. My menu will reflect the proper cuts of meat as well as providing the least waste. My methods will revolve around the practical use of my time given the restraints of my question as well as see if the theme can be practical within industry standards.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Chad Blinebry

The five senses, and the roll of each during dining

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 14:54
Abstract: My vision for my capstone project, is to identify all five senses. Vision, smell, sound, sight, and taste, and highlight each one for a more harmonious dining experience. People often times only focus on the sense of taste and smell while eating. Some focus on vision, with flashy plating styles. But not often enough do people engage all five senses. Not often enough do people think about all the different aspects that tie into gastronomy. Everything from the way food is harvested or foraged to what a certain sound or smell reminds you of is what makes food/cooking one of the last remaining forms of art left in the world. And we need to embrace it. My vision for the first course would be to serve duck bacon, with a candied egg yolk on top of toasted baguette with maple espresso butter. The plate will come out with a hot stone and the bacon would be raw, so when the plate is presented the idea is to sear your own bacon. As a kid I used to love waking up to the sound and smell of sizzling bacon, so my focus for this course would be to bring the panel back to being at home and having mom cook you bacon. For my second course will have a small salad of pea shoots and arugula, dressed with olive oil and orange juice, served with goat cheese, hazelnut praline, orange balsamic vinegar, and herb smoke. The herb smoke is what will make this the “smell” course. With a food smoking gun, ill add lavender, citrus zest and herb stems for a floral scent that will remain on the pallet until the end of the course. My goal is to capture the smoke with clear glass bowls to place over the salad, add the smoke and allow the panel to take off the lid. When removed the smoke will settle up leaving the air smelling like lavender and herbs, enhancing the flavor of every component of the salad. The third course is almost like a pallet cleanser/ awakener (because the second course will be heavy on the mouth and nose.) But it also will enhance the next course. The concept would be the sense of touch/ feel. I remember as a kid going on vacation to Maine with my family and we would go out during low tide and collect oysters on the beach. They feel weird in your hand, and even weirder in your mouth, which makes it perfect for this course. The raw oyster will provide a slimy gelatinous mouth feel complimented by a sweet/spicy/sour kimchi style cabbage which will provide an umami sensation in your mouth and throat. My fourth course will be a butter poached mahi mahi, served with caramelized fennel, snap pea foam, blanched rainbow carrots and truffle oil. The sense I am trying to highlight in this dish is vision. Vision is not typically the first sense used during dining, and from my experiences food always tastes better when it’s thoughtfully plated, colorful, and exciting. So for this one there is no flash or fancy techniques, it’s just a simple & classic dish done right and plated beautifully. And my last course will be a pomegranate Cosmo sphere with fiori salt, and edible flowers. The taste sense, my inspiration for this one was from a dining experience I had at WD-50 in New York City. It was originally an intermezzo and it wasn’t a sphere, it was a sorbet, so I’ve taken this idea and I want to finish the meal with a colorful, sweet & salty pop of pomegranate that will cleanse the pallet and leave the mouth feeling bright and refreshed rather that drowned by fats and sugars (like most desserts.)
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Kurt Boyea

Optimal Clutch Size of American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) in Northern New York

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 12:08
Abstract: American kestrels readily use nest boxes, which makes them perfect candidates for studies on nesting activity and success. Nesting success is important to understand so that managers can effectively assess the productivity of a breeding population of kestrels. The goal of this study was to determine optimum clutch size for American Kestrels in Northern New York. The hypothesis was that optimum clutch size consisted of four eggs per clutch. The objective was to determine what clutch size is most effective at hatching young. The study was conducted during the months of June 2013 through August 2013 on 150 nest boxes that were established in 2002. The contents of each elevated nest box were observed using a video baby monitor attached to an extendible pole to minimize disturbance. Clutch size data and number of chicks hatched was compiled and analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis test. This test was used because it allowed data to be separated into different clutch sizes, and determined the significance between the number of eggs in each clutch and the number of chicks hatched. Clutch sizes varied from 1-5 eggs, with occurrences of one and four eggs being most common. The majority of nesting attempts with one egg failed, resulting in a low probability of chicks hatching from one egg clutches. A clutch size of four eggs has the highest probability of successfully hatching chicks and the highest mean number of chicks hatched compared to the other clutch sizes.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jennifer Miller

Managing Fisher (Martes pennanti) in Region 7 of Central New York: Opening a trapping season

Fri, 05/02/2014 - 20:40
Abstract: In the late 1800’s fisher were very abundant throughout New York State, but they were nearly trapped to extinction by the 1930s. Few populations survived until 1949 when the trapping season was closed. Today fisher can be found throughout approximately 26,000 square miles of forested habitat in the state; many of these areas have established management plans. Region 7 has not established a population estimate of fisher in the past because there have been few sightings until recently. In 2013, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) and Cornell documented fishers at 54 of 100 survey locations in Region 7. The goal of this management plan is to maintain a fisher population that is large enough to sustain itself and support annual trapping seasons in Region 7. To support the goal of opening a trapping season, fisher habitat will be improved by limiting fragmentation and increasing connectivity. Fisher harvests will be limited by issuing harvest tags, and monitored by pelt seal records. Opening a trapping season will improve recreational opportunities for trappers, while assisting in maintaining a healthy predator prey ratio.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Carter O'Gorman

Sous Vide Cooking

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 08:49
Abstract: In the present time, Chefs in restaurants that serve all types of cuisines are looking for different and new ways to manipulate flavors and textures. Some Chefs have found that the sous vide cooking technique is a great way to do just that. Most cuisines are fairly easy to change for the better, but Italian is more difficult since the dishes are typically the same in every Italian restaurant. The purpose of this qualitative, exploratory study is to determine how the sous vide cooking technique can be used in high end Italian cuisine to make the flavors superior to traditional ways of cooking. Data will be collected through a taste testing with product evaluation sheets. The evaluations collected will be thoroughly analyzed to determine which way of cooking is preferred by the culinary and baking students, and also the Chefs at Paul Smith’s College. The result of this study will give Chefs that are cooking Italian cuisine a new way to manipulate the flavors and textures for the better.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Sabrina Tessitore

Organic vs. Inorganic- Perceptions A Study of the Perceived Flavor Differences between Organically and Inorganically Produced Foods Based on the Label “Organic”

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 11:43
Abstract: This research project is a study based on ideas of Jenny Wan-chen Lee and Mitsuru Shimizu’s study (You Taste What You See: Do Organic Labels Bias Taste Perceptions?) This study was specifically focused on culinary students to see if they would be more or less influenced by the label “organic.” It is also a psychological food study on the label organic and the way that such claims affect the consumer’s view on the quality of the product, specifically culinary students. This is done through a blind taste testing study where 24 culinary students and 24 non-culinary students were asked to try same product, but were told that one of the two unlabeled products was “organic” and the other “inorganic.” This study also goes into the qualifications a product must meet in order to be considered USDA certified organic. However, there is a pre-conceived notion that organic food equals a higher quality flavor and the purpose of this study is to see if that pre-conceived notion will affect the way these students can identify differences between two products when they are the same product. The hypothesis is that the culinary students will be less influenced by the label and judge the flavors more critically than those who are untrained in the culinary field.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Thomas Stile