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Capstone Projects

The five senses, and the roll of each during dining

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 14:54
Abstract: My vision for my capstone project, is to identify all five senses. Vision, smell, sound, sight, and taste, and highlight each one for a more harmonious dining experience. People often times only focus on the sense of taste and smell while eating. Some focus on vision, with flashy plating styles. But not often enough do people engage all five senses. Not often enough do people think about all the different aspects that tie into gastronomy. Everything from the way food is harvested or foraged to what a certain sound or smell reminds you of is what makes food/cooking one of the last remaining forms of art left in the world. And we need to embrace it. My vision for the first course would be to serve duck bacon, with a candied egg yolk on top of toasted baguette with maple espresso butter. The plate will come out with a hot stone and the bacon would be raw, so when the plate is presented the idea is to sear your own bacon. As a kid I used to love waking up to the sound and smell of sizzling bacon, so my focus for this course would be to bring the panel back to being at home and having mom cook you bacon. For my second course will have a small salad of pea shoots and arugula, dressed with olive oil and orange juice, served with goat cheese, hazelnut praline, orange balsamic vinegar, and herb smoke. The herb smoke is what will make this the “smell” course. With a food smoking gun, ill add lavender, citrus zest and herb stems for a floral scent that will remain on the pallet until the end of the course. My goal is to capture the smoke with clear glass bowls to place over the salad, add the smoke and allow the panel to take off the lid. When removed the smoke will settle up leaving the air smelling like lavender and herbs, enhancing the flavor of every component of the salad. The third course is almost like a pallet cleanser/ awakener (because the second course will be heavy on the mouth and nose.) But it also will enhance the next course. The concept would be the sense of touch/ feel. I remember as a kid going on vacation to Maine with my family and we would go out during low tide and collect oysters on the beach. They feel weird in your hand, and even weirder in your mouth, which makes it perfect for this course. The raw oyster will provide a slimy gelatinous mouth feel complimented by a sweet/spicy/sour kimchi style cabbage which will provide an umami sensation in your mouth and throat. My fourth course will be a butter poached mahi mahi, served with caramelized fennel, snap pea foam, blanched rainbow carrots and truffle oil. The sense I am trying to highlight in this dish is vision. Vision is not typically the first sense used during dining, and from my experiences food always tastes better when it’s thoughtfully plated, colorful, and exciting. So for this one there is no flash or fancy techniques, it’s just a simple & classic dish done right and plated beautifully. And my last course will be a pomegranate Cosmo sphere with fiori salt, and edible flowers. The taste sense, my inspiration for this one was from a dining experience I had at WD-50 in New York City. It was originally an intermezzo and it wasn’t a sphere, it was a sorbet, so I’ve taken this idea and I want to finish the meal with a colorful, sweet & salty pop of pomegranate that will cleanse the pallet and leave the mouth feeling bright and refreshed rather that drowned by fats and sugars (like most desserts.)
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Kurt Boyea

Healthy Food Truck Menu, in a Festival Setting

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 15:57
Abstract: How could more nutrient dense food be served to a large number of people in a food truck, while maintaining a low cost to the customer and seller alike in an outdoor event setting? When in a music festival setting for example, there are a number of people that go without food, or eat very minimal meals that contain almost no nutritional value over the course of two to three days. Small snacks or one or two meals in two to three days can really take a toll on the body, especially in a party type of event like a music festival. One of the reasons for this is healthier food comes with a cost, the proposed menu is low cost, nutrient dense, flavor packed food that can be carried around easy by festival/ outdoor event goers. The research method used would be a survey to the panel about how much it means to them to have healthy foods or not, how much would this person be willing to spend for the healthier option, if they thought the tasting was a healthier option, and of course taste of the food. With a quick look at catering, and a great deal of information on the food truck trend, where it’s going, and what is being done. This is a chance to tie together the two of the fastest growing trends in the industry, food trucks and health food in a way that could be sold at an affordable cost to the customer, and still be cost effective to the vendor in an outdoor event setting.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Logan Beem

The Vegan Experiment

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 16:43
Abstract: The vegan diet has a reputation as extremely light and unsatisfying “rabbit food.” In reality, eating a vegan diet can be satisfying to the palate and the belly. Health benefits of a vegan diet include reduced risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other chronic ailments, plus weight reduction, increased energy, and better sleep patterns. However, Americans tend to believe that they cannot get proper nutrition without animal products. Studies have shown that proper nutrition can be achieved through a whole foods plant based diet. The meal I presented was designed for carnivores to test whether they missed animal products in the dishes served.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Carrie Oderman

Subtle Differences

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 19:41
Abstract: Our sense of smell and taste work together to allow us to taste and differentiate between different flavors in food. This study was designed to determine the effects of introducing aromatics during the dining experience. Can aromatics change the customer's perception of the flavors or ingredients in a dish? The method used to gather data for the study was a tasting consisting of ten taste panelists. Guest panelists were kept unaware of what the topic was until after the tasting was finished. The two plates in the first course, as well as the second course, were identically prepared so that an aroma could be introduced during the second tasting of the two courses. Each taste panelist received a tasting card containing suggestive statements regarding the texture, flavor, creativity, quality, and professionalism of the dishes presented. Based on a five level Likert-type scale, the tasting card statements required the panelists to circle numbers corresponding to what level they agreed or disagreed with each statement. The final question asked the panelists to choose what the most apparent difference was between the two dishes of each course. In both courses, flavor and ingredient were the options predominately chosen as the most apparent differences.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Alyssa Fredericks

Event Planning and What It Takes

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 21:03
Abstract: The focus of this capstone was event planning. What goes into planning an event? A professional planner needs to think about the goals, the needs of the customer, type of event, food and beverage, facilities and risk. To plan and execute an event, one must determine the type. For example, is it a corporate meeting or fundraising function? A budget is needed for each event to understand what is affordable and what can be done. What type of risk is involved? A good planner needs to plan for the “what ifs” of an event. Technology has changed the event industry. There once was a time when guests of an event would be asked to turn off their cell phones. Now everyone uses their phones at events. People can Tweet live and use social media to increase the experience of events. Planners can use social media to boost their marketing as well. Once a planner has experience in the industry they can apply to become a Certified Meeting Planner or a Certified Special Events Professional. This certification shows that the planner is an expert in their field. This capstone was planning a business plan workshop at Paul Smith’s College. This event was designed to give students a chance to develop a business plan. Potential transfer students were invited to take part in the event. During the event the students had to create a new product to market along with current senior business students who acted as their mentors. Together, they came up with a business plan and had to give an elevator speech on the product to everyone. The winning team was chosen based on the marketing, taste and idea of the product. The event was considered a success by the visitors and the college.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stephanie Dalaba

Is it possible to enhance classical Serbian cuisine by modernizing it?

Thu, 05/08/2014 - 14:05
Abstract: The research will cover the history of Serbian cuisine, how it changed during times, and in what direction could it possibly go. The starting point will be history, in order to understand what food is typically found and grown in the area, but also to discover what influences occurred during wars and migrations, and how the culture adapted to new ingredients and new cooking methods. Eventually the menu will be chosen and 5 classical Serbian dishes will be transformed. The modernized dish will have identical ingredients as the classic one but the cooking methods and the combination of flavors or texture might differ. The panel would be presented with a classical and a modern version of the chosen dish and they would be asked for their preference. The main focus of this research is not to substitute the classical dishes in any way, instead the goal is to improve them.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Marko Lalosevic

Presence and Abundance of Microplastics within Flowing Waters of Private, Wilderness, and Other Forest Preserve Lands of the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 16:26
Abstract: Microplastic sampling was conducted at thirteen locations throughout the water bodies of the Northern Adirondack Region. Plastics were found at all thirteen sites, which were categorized by the impact level of human development. Any particle less than 5mm can be defined as a microplastic particle. Microscopic plastics can be found in a variety of chemical cleaners, clothing fabrics, and concrete solutions. Storm water drainage systems and wastewater treatment plants are confirmed sources of microplastic pollution, which carry pollutants into our rivers, lakes, and streams. Ingestion of microplastic particles can lead to many distinctive threats, including biological and physical abnormalities, while possibly leading to bioaccumulation and biomagnification throughout the food web. Future practices for management and prevention of microplastic pollutants in the Adirondacks is critical for environmental protection, while also portraying a worldly view of an overlooked human induced issue.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Patrick Colern, Sinjin Larson

Craft Beer Distribution

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 12:22
Abstract: Craft beer is distributed in many different places. The purpose of this research is to show how the breweries want to expand on getting out more and different varieties of beers to be sold outside of breweries. This study will use case interviews with existing craft brewers. Included in the interviews will be inquiries on where and why the beer is distributed to certain distribuitors that they have selected. Of the five breweries interviewed, it will explore and give insight on how well the beer is distributed. Beer distribution is huge for breweries and to be able to keep up with what is popularity and explore new varieties will help show if the company is going to be profitable or not.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: beer project.docx
Authors: Kacie McKeown

Extracurricular Activities and Academic Success

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 12:20
Abstract: This report investigates whether student activities has an impact on academic success. The student activities were broken into five categories: on campus clubs and organizations, off campus clubs and organizations, team sports, independent athletics, and jobs. While this subject has been studied before, results tend to differ widely due to college type or sample size. In order to study this on Paul Smith’s College campus, a survey was sent to students containing questions regarding their GPA and in what activities from the five categories they regularly participated. There were 120 responses to the survey. Out of those 120 students, 83 percent reported that they did participate in student activities. Of that 83 percent, 76 percent of students stated that they felt extracurricular activities had helped improve their performance in their academic studies. Of the 83 percent, 45 percent had a 3.5 to 4.0 GPA. While this does seem to support that extracurricular activities has a positive effect on academics, it is uncertain whether students who are more determined and academically inclined are the ones more likely to do extracurricular activities. That would be a topic for further study.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Melissa Tiedt

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities at the Paul Smith’s College VIC

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 15:41
Abstract: The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) says that public facilities, including such places as parks and recreation trails need to be accessible to everyone., Barnum Brook Trail at the Visitor's Interpretive Center (VIC) is considered a mobility challenged accessible trail. Researching other parks throughout the United States can help determine if making this trail at the VIC accessible for persons with a number of disabilities will be beneficial. The other trails will help define who and how big the potential market is for accessible trails. These trails can show us different aspects that exist at other parks, such as Braille signage, ramps and lifts, that we could bring to the Barnum Brook trail and the rest of the VIC. Current such trails include John Dillon Park in upstate New York, in Colorado: Coyote Valley Trails, Sprague Lake, and Lily Lake, Arlington Lions Club Park in Florida, and Papago Park in Arizona. Interviewing people in the surrounding area including those that are providing services to persons with different disabilities at ARC and North Star Industries can help determine if groups of people would be willing to come spend a day enjoying the VIC facilities and trails.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stacy Cavanaugh