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Capstone Projects

Can Restauranteurs Successfully Influence Guest Behavior By Using Facebook?

Sun, 12/02/2012 - 20:55
Abstract: Facebook is a form of social media used by millions on a daily basis. Restauranteurs’ ability to use Facebook to influence guest behavior, build a connection, and receive comments could potentially benefit their restaurants. This study was conducted on Facebook, sending surveys to my “friends,” discovering how restaurants’ Facebook pages are affecting them. Seeing how my study was based on Facebook it was appropriate to only conduct the surveys on this form of social media. The goal was to find if restauranteurs could attract more customers to their restaurant by influencing guest behavior on Facebook. This will prove if using Facebook is a worthwhile marketing tool. People interested in this topic will become more knowledgeable about this form of social media from a business perspective and the Facebook company could benefit from this study as well. This study will give recommendations to restauranteurs on how to make their restaurant “stand out” on Facebook.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Joshua Werksman

Do Adirondack Farmers Perceive Aquaponics as a Solution to the Lack of Year Round Out of Season Local Food?

Sun, 12/02/2012 - 23:59
Abstract: Several different factors contribute to the farmers of the Adirondacks inability to produce sustainable, fresh, local food out of season. This study will provide a comprehensive literature-review-based overview of modern day farming, aquaponics, local food sheds, and the farmers associated with Adirondack Harvest and Green Circle. This capstone seeks to determine via surveys if aquaponics is a solution to the challenges Adirondack farmers face today in their lack of year round productivity. The consensus of this capstone will determine if aquaponics is a solution to the challenges Adirondack farmer’s face regarding the lack of local out of season food for the residents of the Adirondack region.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Aquaponics Capstone
Authors: Ashley Rokjer

Tasty Tunes

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 14:16
Abstract: The senses of hearing and tasting are being paired together more and more as the subject becomes more popular, bringing musicians and chefs closer together. This study will determine the optimal music to play in a particular restaurant and show how well that music stimulates a customer’s palate. A farm-to-table restaurant will be the place of research where music that complements the food will be played on four different nights and customer surveys will measure the differences in taste and customer enjoyment between four different music genres. The data will be used to prove that the optimal music really does make food and the time spent more enjoyable. The results may lead to be very beneficial to dining room managers, restaurant owners, chefs, and musicians who perform in the hospitality industry in their efforts in matching food and dining with music.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Kelsey Jones

From Garden to School: Future Trend Prediction study of school lunches and the edible schoolyard, Kitchen Garden Project, and Let’s Move! Programs.

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 16:59
Abstract: The ‘Edible Schoolyard’ movement is driving schools towards offering freshly grown produce into their school lunch programs. The Edible Schoolyard aims to provide fresh produce with learning experiences in order to encourage school children to eat healthy and make good decisions about what they eat. An edible schoolyard can be utilized as a major development for school systems, especially in the United States where the growing rates of obesity in our children is still increasing. The purpose of this study was to explore the plausibility of a school system adapting the edible schoolyard or even similar program such as: Kitchen Garden Project and Let’s Move!. A survey was used to measure and compare the responses on if the edible schoolyard is possible for a school system to incorporate. The outcome of this survey can be used to persuade schools into deciding whether they think it’s a good idea to adapt the program into their school system, or even deciding if it’s worth implementing some aspects of the edible schoolyard for their schools.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final23.docx
Authors: Barbara Sanchez

Women vs. Men Becoming Executive Chefs

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 17:30
Abstract: Currently culinary school enrollment nationwide is about even between male and female students but there is a gap when it comes to being an executive chef, women only account for 10% of executive chefs. The purpose of this project is to study this gap between men and women in the culinary field and also to see what might be causing these gaps and what other jobs the women have found. Surveys will be given to Paul Smith’s alumni with a four year culinary degree. The survey will find out what type of students they were and what jobs they had wanted and what jobs they have had. The male and female responses will then be compared to each other to see if there are gaps between the information.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Jordan Williams

You Are What You Eat

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 18:12
Abstract: Food plays a huge role for all living organisms. The focus and purpose of this research is to determine if Paul Smith’s College students are getting the nutrients they need to perform well in school. Students need nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals that will help fuel the mind and body. These nutrients can have a tremendous effect on how the body’s behavior, specifically how it copes with stress and memory. The data was collected by observing the food choices offered in the Paul Smith’s College dining hall. It benefits students to have a balanced meal to nourish the mind and body. Offering healthy choices and promoting a balanced diet will benefit the students at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: You are what you eat
Authors: Courtney Sypher

Vertical Gardens

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 21:08
Abstract: Vertical gardens have the potential to be both functional and serve as decoration in the modern restaurant. This Capstone will study vertical gardens and restaurants in the United Sates that currently have vertical gardens, in an effort to determine if vertical gardens could be a profitable investment for the modern restaurant, if vertical gardens are practical for restaurants to have and maintain, and if the vertical garden could serve as a decoration to the restaurants’ guests. Methods will include interviewing chefs and owners of these restaurants and surveying restaurant patrons to measure the amount of value that the restaurant customer places on the idea of vertical gardens in restaurants. The results will prove whether or not the idea of a vertical garden in the restaurant is cost effective, while also providing decoration in the dining room and enhancing the customer experience. Vertical gardens are an integral part of the fresh, local food movement. It is incredibly important for students and professionals alike, to study this important new trend in the industry, especially as the fresh food movement is currently trending.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: FINAL.docx
Authors: Kayla Saenz

Determining the Authenticity in Ethnic Cuisines

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 21:10
Abstract: The United States is often referred to as a melting pot. As many cultures have melded together, so have their cuisines. In recent years, ethnic cuisines’ demand has grown steadily and the market has become saturated with restaurants claiming to be authentic. With this popularity of ethnic foods in the United States, a demand for increased authenticity in ethnic restaurants is higher than ever. However, what makes an ethnic restaurant authentic? The purpose of this study is to look at the opinions of both consumers and industry professionals to find what each group finds important when determining authenticity. Research was done via online surveys sent to culinary professionals working in ethnic restaurants and diners of ethnic restaurants to determine what each population deemed most important when preparing ethnic food and when choosing an ethnic restaurant. The outcome of this study can be used by any person looking to open an authentic ethnic restaurant or looking to improve on their already existing restaurant.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Blue Swan Otto

The Root of The Problem

Wed, 12/05/2012 - 15:35
Abstract: Abstract The local food movement is a leading trend in the restaurant industry. Paul Smith’s College utilizes multiple culinary labs and an on-site restaurant. Considering the industry trend and the amount of produce used on a daily basis, how can we better utilize our produce? This study seeks to determine if a root cellar could help increase the shelf life of vegetables for the culinary labs and St. Regis Café. Invoices of vegetable orders from vendors (specifically Sysco) will be gathered and analyzed. The data collected will be used to determine the feasibility of methods related to vegetable preservation.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone Final
Authors: Christian Hunter

Extreme Local: Weighing the Financials of Growing Produce On-Premise

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 16:31
Abstract: Restaurant owners across the United States create revenue by limiting their food costs. As the demand for locally grown, organic produce rises, these individuals find it increasingly difficult to offer these comparatively expensive ingredients without raising prices or facing an increase in food cost percentage. This study aims to discover the financial benefits and risks of growing organic produce on-premise, an alternative to buying these ingredients. Comparing the cost of gardening to the perceived value of its product, a financial analysis will assess the return on perfectly ripened, fresh ingredients. The findings will be used to determine the viability of small scale on-premise gardening in any small to medium sized restaurant.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Brandon Bills Capstone.docx
Authors: Brandon Bills