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Capstone Projects

A COPAR Report of Ethnographic Inquiry Addressing Issues of Water Availability and Hygiene Mathare Valley, Nairobi, Kenya

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 21:30
Abstract: I conducted a cyclical ethnographic inquiry in the Mathare Valley informal settlement of Nairobi, Kenya, during the months of May and June 2012. My question was: How do Mathare residents interact with and access water and what are the technological and environmental restrictions limiting or preventing adequate water supply? The goal of this study was to create environmental and social change by improving access to water for consumption and bathing. As both a researcher and technical advisor, I adopted and used Community Oriented Participatory Action Research (COPAR). This research approach required my immersion into the Kenyan culture where I lived, ate and slept in the informal settlement of Mathare Valley, interviewing a total of 49 families on communal issues of water and hygiene. While in Mathare, I recorded quantitative and qualitative data comparing wet and dry seasons; distance to water sources; amount of water used; cost of water; and prevalence of disease (represented by potability) as well as issues regarding the Nairobi City Council, communal water availability, and hygienic conditions. A potential solution to water conservation and hygiene was construction of a bucket shower (several liter metal bucket with handle and valve to control water flow) to conserve bathing water reducing overall consumption. Through analysis of seven major, quantitatively and qualitatively determined themes, this paper presents anecdotal evidence in the context of empirical data through temporal revelation of thematic constraints. I found that during the dry season: family members in Mathare travel significantly farther to gather water, spending more money while consuming less water presenting complex issues among livelihoods within an informal settlement environment.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Anderson_Ian_Capstone.docx
Authors: Ian Anderson

Remote Sensing for Forest Change Detection in Afghanistan

Fri, 04/26/2013 - 08:41
Abstract: Abstract: Afghanistan’s forests are one of the country’s most important natural resources. Afghanistan has faced conflicts that have plagued the country for more than 25 years and resulted in rapid deforestation and environmental despoliation. Forested lands need to be preserved in order for Afghanistan to revamp social and economic livelihoods and control the environmental degradation. This study will analyze Landsat satellite imagery using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and ERDAS DeltaCue change detection software to assess forest deviations in Afghanistan between 1998 and 2010. Areas in Nangarhar Province identified significant change in vegetation cover in terms of both deforestation and reforestation. Deforestation occurred more frequently around the city edges of Jalalabad, whereas reforestation occurred farther from settlements. The Tasseled Cap process produced a final output change detection layer which represented the combined detection of all significant change between the three images. Determining where deforestation is occurring through Remote Sensing is a critical first step towards rehabilitating Afghanistan’s forest productivity.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
Authors: David Lattuca

A Meta-Analysis of the Impacts of Professional Bass Fishing Tournaments

Mon, 04/29/2013 - 19:28
Abstract: Professional black bass (Micropterous spp.) fishing tournaments have significant economic benefits associated with them; however concerns about various negative ecological effects are being raised. Fish mortality has the potential to be critically high following release of the fish, whether it be from stress, hooking injuries, heat exposure, disease, or a lack of sufficient oxygen. Mortality can occur prior to release, or it can occur several days to even weeks after release. The vast majority of organized tournaments release all of the fish in one specific location once the weigh-in process has been completed. The lack of dispersal among bass once they are released back into the water is another key issue. Utilizing 17 different studies on mortality and 8 studies on dispersal, this meta-analysis study looks at how tournaments can affect the bass population in lakes and rivers across the country. It also examines the variables that affect mortality and dispersal such as season, water temperature, location, and species of bass. The potential ways for the survival rate to be improved is also discussed. The results of the meta-analysis showed that water temperature had a significant impact on mortality, as did the time of year the tournaments were held. Mortality was highest from a period of 1-10 days following the tournaments, but was still occurring up to one month after. Dispersal was highest for Largemouth Bass, and for Spring-held tournaments. The study concludes that there are several ways to potentially lower the tournament associated mortality rate for black bass.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Brett Leidner

The Redevelopment of the Hiking Treks of BSA Camp Russell of the Revolutionary Trails Council

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 09:48
Abstract: High Adventure Programs are extremely important for Boy Scouts of America Councils. These programs do everything from hiking, biking, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, and rock climbing. Each council has their own unique programs specifically made for their area. For Camp Russell of White Lake, NY, redevelopment for part of their High Adventure Program is needed due to the being out of date: The Hiking Treks. New treks will be created with the help of trail mapping with a GPS unit, the ArcMap program, and online research. When all the data is collected, Camp Russell will be supplied with a map that shows many hiking trails within a reasonable driving distance. With this map, a manual will be created that zooms in to each hiking area that has the statistics of each hike. This map can be used by the Camp Russell staff for years to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Final_Withey.docx
Authors: Richard J. Withey

A Study of Adaptive Skiing and Snowboarding Accomodations

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 20:05
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to observe, analyze and numerically evaluate a total of six ski resorts based on their degree of facilitation for people with both physical and cognitive disabilities that wish to participate in adaptive skiing and snowboarding. The outcome of this study was to discover themes that are common among different resorts. This study had a focus on ski resorts located in the Northeast, specifically New York and Vermont. The Adaptive Sports Center (ASC) located at Crested Butte Mountain Resort, Colorado is a nationally recognized organization, and was held as the standard for this study. The operational techniques and strategies being used at the ASC at Crested Butte were evaluated alongside those in New York and Vermont to further understand the degree of facilitation currently provided for this user group. The resorts located in New York State that were observed are Whiteface Mountain and Gore Mountain. The resort locations in the State of Vermont were the Smuggler’s Notch Adaptive Program at Smuggler’s Notch Resort, Killington Resort at Pico Mountain, and Sugarbush Resort, which both operate under Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports. The outcome of this study can be used by program directors at ski resorts that offer adaptive program in order to better accommodate for adaptive skiers and snowboarders.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
File Attachments: final capstone.doc
Authors: Daniel Lewis

Green Roof Technologies in Adirondack Wilderness Areas

Fri, 04/26/2013 - 11:01
Abstract: Wilderness is qualified by two main characteristics: naturalness and solitude. To enhance these characteristics, many things are excluded from wilderness areas including roads, motorized vehicles and human-made structures of any kind. However some argue there needs to be greater consideration to structures that are a regional legacy and hold considerable historical significance. The Adirondack lean-to is a well-known entity associated with the Adirondack Park but much debate exists over whether or not such structures should be allowed in wilderness areas. The addition of green roofs to lean-tos can possibly mediate the humanness of these structures and produce a three-fold benefit. First, green roofs increase the naturalness of the lean-to. Second, they provide a model for naturalness and sustainability. Third, green roofs on lean-tos provide an additional benefit by lowering, however modestly, the impact of these structures on the natural environment. This qualitative study conducted a series of interviews to examine the feasibility and gauge the receptivity of stakeholders to this idea. Identified themes included the maintenance required to keep up the roofs, the cost and labor of installation and their longevity. Additional themes included the perceived lack of benefits, cultural and historical significance as well as the possibility of green-roofed lean-tos to provide an educational benefit. The data suggest that the benefits associated with green roofs on lean-tos may outweigh the cost of their installation. The naturalness of the green roof on the lean-t may thus offset the “unnaturalness” of the structures themselves to the degree that lean-tos may be perceived as more conforming to wilderness areas. This study concludes that further research is needed into the technical aspects of green roof construction including the amount of maintenance required and the use of wilderness compliant materials. The interest in green-roofed lean-tos appears to exist and with additional technical data it may be possible to take the next step.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
Authors: Alison Liedkie

Sharing the John Dillon Park Experience with More Visitors: A marketing and management strategy, to increase visitor usage concentrating on organizations for people with disabilities and Veterans

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 17:54
Abstract: International Paper John Dillon Park (JDP) is a fully accessible campground managed by Paul Smith's College (PSC). Fully accessible means it was designed so anyone, regardless of the presence of a disability, can utilize the facility. The campground has not been near full capacity since it was opened in 2006. PSC wishes to increase those visitor numbers concentrating on Veterans and organizations for people with disabilities. A survey was conducted of the current park visitors to obtain information needed to help define the desired demographic and other information needed for the marketing strategy of JDP. These visitor responses showed that PSC needs to concentrate its marketing efforts into better contact with its current users to stimulate return users, make a few changes to the facilities themselves, and advertise within magazines, Veteran organizations, organizations for people with disabilities and Fort Drum. Also, the responses informed PSC that it needs to provide for the recollection phase of the recreational experience by selling JDP souvenirs. With an increase in the visitor usage of JDP, more people will be able to appreciate the serenity of nature and the camping experience JDP offers to all people.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Jeffrey T. Bellaire.pdf
Authors: Jeffrey T. Bellaire

Tracking the fire history and succession of the Bloomingdale bog

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 17:58
Abstract: This study examined core samples from the Bloomingdale bog. This bog was chosen for its great span over the landscape. The study was conducted in order to locate and identify changes that may have been induced by variation in local water tables from such things as climate change, change in ecosystem dynamics, and from degradation. Also, to establish the foundation information for future studies to expand on. This study included two transects across the bog. Each transect had seven points where samples where extracted. These points were selected randomly along each transect, as to avoid some bias in the study. We quantified the organic matter, the major transition layers, and four carbon dates. This data was used to determine the major transitions in organic material in the bog, when the bog experienced these changes, and a fire history pattern of the bog. In addition, the data showed where and when a possible significant drought had occurred in the bog. This study is the backbone for future studies perhaps on such subjects as climate change, watersheds effects on local wetland ecosystems, and a possible fire history for this area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: capstone paper.pdf
Authors: Joshua L. Robtoy, Sidney E. Cushing Jr.

An Analysis of Possible Forest Type Shifts due to Asian Longhorned Beetle Invasion in the Northern Hardwood Forest of Hebron, NY

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:10
Abstract: The Asian Longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is an invasive alien insect that poses a severe threat to forests of the northeastern United States. If this insect is allowed to run rampant through our forests there will be huge economic and ecological implications. This study hopes to provide a better understanding of these potential implications and provide potential policies for managing and controlling this insect that has potentially devastating effects on the hardwood forests of the northeast. The study on hand will explore the effects on current forest types in Hebron, NY and what future regeneration may look like in the aftermath of an ALB infestation. ALB has the potential to completely change not only the landscape but also alter current markets based around the northern hardwood stand type. This study was designed to attempt to grasp the magnitude and effects of an infestation by ALB. Current policies were reviewed to attempt to create a possible set of management strategies that could be used to minimize the effects of the ALB. Possible forest type shifts were predicted for the area based upon species range and soil types present in the study area. It is important to understand not only what ALB is capable of but also what can be expected to happen if or when it does move through the area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Complete Project.docx
Authors: Leonard Jenkins, Robert Bell, Schuyler VanAuken

Analyzing 58 years of New York State stumpage reports for Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum), Red Oak (Quercus rubra) and White Pine (Pinus strobus): A real value price trend analysis

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:51
Abstract: The trends in stumpage prices reported for New York State fluctuate over time. Three popular species for saw timber in the state of New York are sugar maple, red oak, and white pine. This report produced trends that demonstrate the comparative value of each species over the reported time (58 years), as well as a net present value in 2011 dollars, providing a price trend after inflation was removed. Surrounding states, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, have similar reports which are utilized by forest economists to assess investments. As of this point, New York does not have a stumpage trend analysis to compare forest value and productivity. This project examined the stumpage trends for each species and offers possible correlation between points in the trends and specific events. The trends are projected as dollar values over time. Market trend correlation examines the demand for saw timber between hardwood and softwood, with the addition of red oak as another popular saw timber species, and as a color preference factor. The effect of political constraints, in the form of forest preservation, was analyzed with respect to the overall impact on wood flow. Timelines for insect/disease outbreaks were correlated to the highlights of the stumpage trends.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final Capstone.docx
Authors: Zachary D. Lyon