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Capstone Projects

Managing Growth: A Study of Succession Practices in Family Restaurants

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 21:59
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent the succession and management practice of a family-owned restaurant correlates to its success as a business. This exploratory, qualitative study will ask what do family restaurants consider to be the most successful succession planning strategies in their businesses. This study will help to better understand and identify the significance of succession practices. The methodology used will be a structured interview. The questions asked during the interview will be “yes” or “no” answers with the option to elaborate if necessary. Family restaurants are measured using interviews in Tioga County, Pennsylvania and data will be collected upon interview. Data from the interview will be analyzed and compiled together to show family restaurants optimal succession planning practices. The outcome of this study can be used by family restaurants seeking to pass down their business to younger generations.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: FINAL CAPSTONE.doc
Authors: Elizabeth Compton

Impact of Wellness Policies on Public School A La Carte Food Sales

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 20:00
Abstract: While nutrition and wellness standards in schools have been a topic of concern for many nutrition experts, schools are sometimes reluctant to modify foods sold to meet healthier standards in fear it will negatively impact sales. The purpose of this quantitative, comparative study was to analyze the impact of varying types of wellness policies in Upstate New York public schools on a la carte food sales. Data was collected in the form of daily sales reports provided by school food service managers from schools with varying types of wellness policies in several Upstate New York public high schools and were compared to see the differences, similarities, and other notable patterns in sales of items sold. This will help schools in the process of producing wellness plans predict which a la carte sales will be most beneficial, as well as understand the implications of the USDA’s recently proposed guideline for school foods. This study will benefit school food services from a sales perspective while maintaining the effort to provide today’s youth with healthy options in schools.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone.docx
Authors: Amy Rogers

Draft Horse Sustainability Presentations: The effectiveness of presentations on draft animal power at the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival

Fri, 12/06/2013 - 12:53
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College has been putting on draft horse presentations for the public for many years but until now it was unknown how effective these were in education of the audience in topics of the interest. During the 2013 Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival, a series of demonstrations and presentations were conducted for the public. Surveys of those in attendance have now given us information on how far people are traveling, what their prior experience is, what they want to learn, and how they want to learn it. From this information we wish to gauge attendees’ response to draft animals and their uses.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
Authors: Alexandria Barner, Jacob Shultz

Effects of Food Plots on (1) White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Movement, (2) Antler Growth and (3) Potential Use by Other Wildlife on a Private 173 Acres in Davenport, NY

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 11:23
Abstract: In Davenport, New York, a 172.9 acre property is planning to undergo changes to suit a white-tailed deer management plan. This plan involves implementing four food plots of 4.25 acres, providing a year-long source of quality forage for the local deer herd, after initially clear-cutting 17 acres of forested land in spring 2012. Goals of food plot establishment are to supplement the value of the land as a hunting lease, increase viewing opportunities of deer, increase antler growth among bucks in the local deer herd, and to adequately supplement the diet of the local deer herd. This study focuses on the effects on (1) movement and (2) antler growth of white-tailed deer after the implementation of food plots on a forested property. Another component is the (3) potential for utilization of these food plots by other species of wildlife. Movement of deer will be assessed based on scat count, track count, and images of observed movement via trail cameras on travel routes. Deviation will be recorded from established travel routes, to new travel routes once the food plots have been implemented. The plot containing white clover showed the highest level of utility post-planting, followed by chicory, alfalfa and turnips.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
Authors: Nicholas K. Zemlachenko

The role of terrestrial leaf litter inputs on drift of aquatic invertebrate shredders

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 13:34
Abstract: This study examined the effect of food availability on active drift entry of aquatic invertebrates by comparing drift density at low and high levels of terrestrial leaf litter input in Alder Brook. An emphasis was placed on the proportion of shredders collected during each sampling, who rely most on coarse particulate organic matter as a food source. In order to quantify food available in the stream channel, leaf packs were collected along three transects and weighed to determine dry biomass per stream area. Invertebrate drift samples were collected at high (leaf abscission) and low levels (late summer) of food abundance using three surber nets spaced evenly across the stream channel. Samples were taken at 3-hr intervals over a 24-hr sampling period. Out of eight sampling periods, drift density at low litter input was found to be greatest just after sunset and through the evening hours. Drift densities were significantly higher during 2 sampling periods and numerically higher for an additional 4 sampling periods. Shredders did not comprise the greatest proportion of the drift at low litter input, only accounting for 0.4% of total drifting invertebrates. The proportion of shredders increased to 36.2% at high litter input.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Final_Manuscript_Simek.docx
Authors: Zachary Simek

A COPAR Report of Ethnographic Inquiry Addressing Issues of Water Availability and Hygiene Mathare Valley, Nairobi, Kenya

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 21:30
Abstract: I conducted a cyclical ethnographic inquiry in the Mathare Valley informal settlement of Nairobi, Kenya, during the months of May and June 2012. My question was: How do Mathare residents interact with and access water and what are the technological and environmental restrictions limiting or preventing adequate water supply? The goal of this study was to create environmental and social change by improving access to water for consumption and bathing. As both a researcher and technical advisor, I adopted and used Community Oriented Participatory Action Research (COPAR). This research approach required my immersion into the Kenyan culture where I lived, ate and slept in the informal settlement of Mathare Valley, interviewing a total of 49 families on communal issues of water and hygiene. While in Mathare, I recorded quantitative and qualitative data comparing wet and dry seasons; distance to water sources; amount of water used; cost of water; and prevalence of disease (represented by potability) as well as issues regarding the Nairobi City Council, communal water availability, and hygienic conditions. A potential solution to water conservation and hygiene was construction of a bucket shower (several liter metal bucket with handle and valve to control water flow) to conserve bathing water reducing overall consumption. Through analysis of seven major, quantitatively and qualitatively determined themes, this paper presents anecdotal evidence in the context of empirical data through temporal revelation of thematic constraints. I found that during the dry season: family members in Mathare travel significantly farther to gather water, spending more money while consuming less water presenting complex issues among livelihoods within an informal settlement environment.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Anderson_Ian_Capstone.docx
Authors: Ian Anderson

Remote Sensing for Forest Change Detection in Afghanistan

Fri, 04/26/2013 - 08:41
Abstract: Abstract: Afghanistan’s forests are one of the country’s most important natural resources. Afghanistan has faced conflicts that have plagued the country for more than 25 years and resulted in rapid deforestation and environmental despoliation. Forested lands need to be preserved in order for Afghanistan to revamp social and economic livelihoods and control the environmental degradation. This study will analyze Landsat satellite imagery using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and ERDAS DeltaCue change detection software to assess forest deviations in Afghanistan between 1998 and 2010. Areas in Nangarhar Province identified significant change in vegetation cover in terms of both deforestation and reforestation. Deforestation occurred more frequently around the city edges of Jalalabad, whereas reforestation occurred farther from settlements. The Tasseled Cap process produced a final output change detection layer which represented the combined detection of all significant change between the three images. Determining where deforestation is occurring through Remote Sensing is a critical first step towards rehabilitating Afghanistan’s forest productivity.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2013
Authors: David Lattuca

A MULTI-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF FOREST HARVESTING FOR WOODY BIOFUELS ON MAMMALIAN COMMUNITIES IN A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST

Fri, 02/01/2013 - 16:19
Abstract: Forest harvesting and subsequent effects on forest structure have been shown to influence mammalian community assemblages and the abundance of individual species, however less attention has been paid to the implications of how harvested timber is used. This is particularly relevant in the Northern Forest, where a considerable portion of the forest harvesting is used to produce biofuels. Biofuels harvesting typically involves the process of whole-tree chipping which may lead to a dramatic reduction in the amount of woody material in the form of slash and coarse woody debris (CWD) left in harvested stands. The goal of our study was to assess the effects of biofuels harvesting on forest structure and subsequent effects on mammalian community structure and abundance. To address this goal, we focused on a ~35 Ha area of partially-harvested northern hardwood forest in the northern Adirondacks, New York. To sample mammals we used a combination of Sherman traps and track plates established at two scales across stands within this area. Our results showed that the response of small mammals to changes in forest structure is both species and scale specific. At the individual trap scale, CWD, slash, and understory cover were important drivers of the occurrence of individual species of small mammals. At the larger “grid” scale, small mammal relative abundance was driven by canopy cover and the density of woody stems. Our results indicate that the current harvesting practices used for biofuel production in the Adirondacks are unlikely to result in declines in abundance of common small mammal species. However, the retention of some slash post-harvest may be beneficial to some species, thus foresters may want to include slash retention when developing silvicultural prescriptions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
Authors: Cody Laxton, Alisha Benack, Danielle Ball, Scott Collins, Sam Forlenza, Richard Franke, Stephanie Korzec, Alec Judge, Connor Langevin, Jonathan Vimislik, Elena Zito

Sharing the John Dillon Park Experience with More Visitors: A marketing and management strategy, to increase visitor usage concentrating on organizations for people with disabilities and Veterans

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 17:54
Abstract: International Paper John Dillon Park (JDP) is a fully accessible campground managed by Paul Smith's College (PSC). Fully accessible means it was designed so anyone, regardless of the presence of a disability, can utilize the facility. The campground has not been near full capacity since it was opened in 2006. PSC wishes to increase those visitor numbers concentrating on Veterans and organizations for people with disabilities. A survey was conducted of the current park visitors to obtain information needed to help define the desired demographic and other information needed for the marketing strategy of JDP. These visitor responses showed that PSC needs to concentrate its marketing efforts into better contact with its current users to stimulate return users, make a few changes to the facilities themselves, and advertise within magazines, Veteran organizations, organizations for people with disabilities and Fort Drum. Also, the responses informed PSC that it needs to provide for the recollection phase of the recreational experience by selling JDP souvenirs. With an increase in the visitor usage of JDP, more people will be able to appreciate the serenity of nature and the camping experience JDP offers to all people.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Jeffrey T. Bellaire.pdf
Authors: Jeffrey T. Bellaire

An Analysis of Possible Forest Type Shifts due to Asian Longhorned Beetle Invasion in the Northern Hardwood Forest of Hebron, NY

Mon, 04/16/2012 - 18:10
Abstract: The Asian Longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is an invasive alien insect that poses a severe threat to forests of the northeastern United States. If this insect is allowed to run rampant through our forests there will be huge economic and ecological implications. This study hopes to provide a better understanding of these potential implications and provide potential policies for managing and controlling this insect that has potentially devastating effects on the hardwood forests of the northeast. The study on hand will explore the effects on current forest types in Hebron, NY and what future regeneration may look like in the aftermath of an ALB infestation. ALB has the potential to completely change not only the landscape but also alter current markets based around the northern hardwood stand type. This study was designed to attempt to grasp the magnitude and effects of an infestation by ALB. Current policies were reviewed to attempt to create a possible set of management strategies that could be used to minimize the effects of the ALB. Possible forest type shifts were predicted for the area based upon species range and soil types present in the study area. It is important to understand not only what ALB is capable of but also what can be expected to happen if or when it does move through the area.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Complete Project.docx
Authors: Leonard Jenkins, Robert Bell, Schuyler VanAuken