After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

The Effects on Soil Caused by Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) in a Northern Hardwood Forest in the Northern Adirondack Mountains

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 10:54
Abstract: Plant invasions are thought to be among the worst causes of biological extinction and biodiversity loss in the modern world. With the United States spending upward of thirty four million dollars a year in attempts to control and repair the damages caused by invasive plants, not only are we feeling the biological effects, but we financially cannot afford to keep combating these invasive species (Barto and Cipollini, 2009). Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) can invade multiple types of sites whether the soil is sandy or if a site has been disturbed. This invasive species will take over the understory and alter soil chemistry (Morris, McClain, Anderson and McConnaughay, 2012). This study aimed to look at how garlic mustard is affecting soils in the northern Adirondack Mountains in New York State. Although currently scattered and not very prevalent, there have already been changes to the soil chemistry. This study was conducted by setting up multiple plots within areas where garlic mustard was present and gathering soil to be used to test for nutrient values. It was found in this study that calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, potassium, sodium, aluminum and soil pH values changed due to the presence of garlic mustard.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Forestry
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Final.docx
Authors: Kyle Dash

An Educational Assessment of a Nature Center

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 15:18
Abstract: Currently, there is a strong focus on public environmental education. However, it is not known how environmental education programs relate to the New York State Curricula or to the North American Association for Environmental Education’s (NAAEE) education goals for school-aged children. The purpose of this qualitative, relationship study is to determine how and to what extent a nature center’s educational programs relate to New York State Curricula and the North American Association for Environmental Education’s education goals for school aged children. Data will be collected through a content analysis approach. The information gathered from the content analysis will then be compared against each other to see where there are gaps in the nature center’s educational goals and how they might ameliorate them. This information can be used by the nature center to format their educational programs in a way that is more conducive with both the New York State Curricula and the NAAEE educational goals.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Studies
Year: 2013
Authors: Jacqueline McCabe

Draft Horse Sustainability Presentations: The effectiveness of presentations on draft animal power at the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival

Fri, 12/06/2013 - 12:53
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College has been putting on draft horse presentations for the public for many years but until now it was unknown how effective these were in education of the audience in topics of the interest. During the 2013 Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival, a series of demonstrations and presentations were conducted for the public. Surveys of those in attendance have now given us information on how far people are traveling, what their prior experience is, what they want to learn, and how they want to learn it. From this information we wish to gauge attendees’ response to draft animals and their uses.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2013
Authors: Alexandria Barner, Jacob Shultz

Risk on the Rocks: A study of risk as related to self efficacy in rock climbing

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 15:50
Abstract: Self efficacy is being confident in ones skills or ability to perform a task and may be directly linked to risk in relation to rock climbing. Risk is exposing oneself to danger that can cause you threat loss or harm. The purpose of this project is to see if there is a direct correlation between the risks that rock climbers take and their experience level. A goal sample of 100 rock climbers will partake in a survey asking questions that will help to estimate confidence, age, gender and risk taking behaviors in climbers. This study hopes to show that climbers are more willing to take risks when they are more confident in their experiences. The significance of this study will be useful to the climbing community as a whole because very little research has been conducted on this specific area of climbing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Risk on the Rocks Capstone
Authors: Matthew Baer

An Investigation into the Pennsylvania Sunday Hunting Debate

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 14:17
Abstract: A current debate in Pennsylvania is taking place on the floor of the state congress and throughout small towns. Pennsylvania is one of eleven states that restrict Sunday hunting in some way. Recent bills have attempted to remove the blue law that currently restricts Sunday hunting in the state. Presently this attempt faces stiff opposition from famers, clergy, and other people who recreate outside. Most surprisingly though, is the large amount of varying opinion from hunters themselves on the Sunday hunting issue. This project will take an unbiased look into the Sunday hunting debate, and attempt to gain an understanding of why hunters have formed the opinions that they currently have. The project will then allow citizens of Pennsylvania to make a more informed decision on the issue of Sunday hunting.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
Authors: Robert J Edkin

Paul Smith's College Bouldering Guidebook

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 12:41
Abstract: The climbing community of Paul Smith’s College is rapidly expanding. Consequently, there are needs for an established set of climbing ethics (the informal guidelines that govern the development of new routes or climbing areas) and nearby places to practice climbing outdoors. To meet this need, a bouldering guidebook for the local area surrounding Paul Smith’s College that emphasizes ethical climbing practices will be produced. We will explore the woods that are within no more than a 10-minute drive from campus for glacial erratics that are suitable for bouldering. We will compile a set of at least 30 boulders that will be included in a guidebook and spend the spring, summer, and early fall of 2012 cleaning, developing, and documenting them. This guidebook will serve as a valuable resource for many future generations of climbers at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Dylan Shows, William Pregnall

A Paul Smith's College Student Recreational Needs Assessment, A Look Into the Recreation and Leisure Needs and Wants of the Students at Paul Smith's College

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 10:44
Abstract: Paul Smith’s College offers its students what seems like an endless amount of recreation and leisure opportunities. In the field of recreation, a needs assessment is the standard used to gauge the level at which the needs and wants of the users, in this case the students of Paul Smith’s College, are being met by the recreation and leisure programming and facilities available to them. An electronically distributed survey was emailed to all currently enrolled students asking them for their responses regarding the current and potential recreation and leisure opportunities available to them. The results were analyzed to concentrate the emerging themes. Suggestions were than produced that will help align available opportunities with the wants and needs of the students. Most of the suggestions deal with changes to programming, such as expanded offerings and extending the hours that programming such as the climbing wall and swimming pool are open. Yet, there were also recommendations made regarding the facilities, such as adding equipment to the climbing wall to enhance safety. The recommendations, which were directly arrived at using the student's responses, aim at bettering the available recreation and leisure opportunities. That in turn would better serve the students, while clarifying needs and wants to the staff associated with campus recreation at Paul Smith's College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2012
Authors: Daniel Dwyer

Monitoring the Zebra Mussel Invasion Front: Use of New Technology

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 15:39
Abstract: Zebra mussels are invasive mollusks that are affecting the well-being of the water bodies in the United States. This study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) is a sensitive early detection system that may be useful in monitoring their spread. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of eDNA technology in identifying infested water bodies, to determine if zebra mussel DNA is in the Adirondack water bodies not known to be infested, if the water chemistry of these water bodies is favorable for zebra mussel establishment, and if the eDNA technology is transferable to an institution like Paul Smith’s College. Eighteen lakes, all in New York State were sampled, fifteen of which are located in the Adirondack Park. DNA was extracted from water and plankton samples and species specific primers were used for PCR amplification to determine if zebra mussel DNA was present. Of seven samples taken from sites known to be infested, five of these tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Four lakes not known to be infested within the Park also tested positive for zebra mussel eDNA. Based on zebra mussel risk parameters (water chemistry) applied to 1,469 Adirondack water bodies, less than 3% are at risk of zebra mussel establishment. However it is possible that established populations could occur at microsites that may have locally high levels of calcium and higher pH.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Environmental Studies, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Alexandria Bevilacqua, John Bishop, Charles Cain, Tyler Clark, Seth Crevison, Robert Culyer, Ryan Deibler, Brian DeMeo, Jonathan Eckert, Kirsten Goranowski, Joelle Guisti, Alan Jancef, Korinna Marino, Michelle Melagrano, KaitlynNedo, Joseph Nelson, Aaron Palmieri, Cole Reagan, John Scahill, JohnathanStrassheim, Scott Travis, Sarah Van Nostrand and Sarah Vella

Accommodation for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 18:18
Abstract: Hotels and recreational facilities do not always have adequate accommodations, to help the Deaf culture communicate with the hearing world and take advantage of special services. Hotels and recreational facilities are improving their accommodation but more can be done to meet the needs for this demographic. This study will research what services are already available for the Deaf culture in hotels and recreational facilities. The outcome will determine what the Deaf culture prefers in accommodations, what hotels and recreation facilities offer, and new accommodations. This will help not only the Deaf culture, but everyone by breaking the language barrier between hearing and Deaf. The Deaf culture can benefit by utilizing new technology to have a more enjoyable experience at hotels and recreational facilities.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Virginia Schertel, Allison Moscato

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick