After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

New York State Feral Hog (Sus scrofa) Management Plan: Species Eradication and Public Education

Thu, 04/25/2013 - 11:22
Abstract: Feral hogs, also referred to as feral swine, Eurasian or Russian wild boar, and wild pigs, are the same species Sus scofa. They are an aggressive invasive species introduced to the United States in the 1500s and have spread over most of the country in the last few decades (Gipson et al. 1998). Due to their unique life history feral hogs are a persevering ungulate species capable of causing extensive economical and ecological damage while causing a threat to human health and safety. They are considered one of the world’s worst invasive species (Lowe et al. 2000). Extinction of native species and loss of biodiversity due to this widely invasive species has been documented worldwide (Wolf and Conover 2003). This management plan describes the life history of feral hogs, the need for management in New York State, several action plans to address the need for management, and assessment protocol for each action plan. Also included in this plan is a grant request to fund the educational objectives in order to achieve more awareness and cooperation with the public, promoting higher probability of management success.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Feral Hog Management Plan
Authors: William Schmieder Jr.

Tardigrade Abundance in Green Shield Lichens on Different Tree Species

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 18:43
Abstract: Many studies have been done on tardigrades, a microscopic, aquatic organism that feeds on plant cell fluid, bacteria, algae, protozoa, and other small invertebrates. Most of these studies have addressed their ability to survive extreme environments and not their preferred living habitats. Virtually no studies have been done investigating the ecology of tardigrades. This study focuses on which species of tardigrade live on a species of lichen (Common Greenshield Lichen, Flavoparmelia caperata) found on three species of trees; Red Maple (Acer rubrum), Black Cherry (Prunus serotina), and White Pine (Pinus strobus). Five trees of each species were chosen and five samples of the Common Greenshield Lichen were taken from all 25 trees during each of the fall and winter seasons. From every lichen sample processed, five slides were looked at, each containing two drops of the water that the lichen was suspended in for 2 hours. The samples were looked at underneath a compound microscope and a dichotomous key was used to identify tardigrades that were found. Due to the fact that liquid water is less available in winter, samples were taken during the fall and winter to look at the differences in species diversity and abundance. The greatest abundance of tardigrades was found on Red Maple, during both fall and winter. Black Cherry had the lowest abundance of tardigrades during both fall and winter. White Pine had an abundance less than that of Red Maple but greater than that of the Black Cherry. There were more tardigrades found on the lichen in fall than in winter. This implies that they find Red Maple a more suitable habitat than the Black Cherry and White Pine, may be related to acidity of the Black Cherry and White Pine being greater than that of Red Maple. Throughfall and stemflow on the trees may also contribute to habitat preference of the tardigrades.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Report.docx
Authors: Heather Cooner

An Educational Assessment of a Nature Center

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 15:18
Abstract: Currently, there is a strong focus on public environmental education. However, it is not known how environmental education programs relate to the New York State Curricula or to the North American Association for Environmental Education’s (NAAEE) education goals for school-aged children. The purpose of this qualitative, relationship study is to determine how and to what extent a nature center’s educational programs relate to New York State Curricula and the North American Association for Environmental Education’s education goals for school aged children. Data will be collected through a content analysis approach. The information gathered from the content analysis will then be compared against each other to see where there are gaps in the nature center’s educational goals and how they might ameliorate them. This information can be used by the nature center to format their educational programs in a way that is more conducive with both the New York State Curricula and the NAAEE educational goals.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Studies
Year: 2013
Authors: Jacqueline McCabe

Paul Smith's College & International Learning: A Small Scale Assessment of Student Perceived Personal & Academic Gains

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 22:16
Abstract: Many students who participate in a study abroad experience during their college or university career experience positive gains on personal and academic levels. This growth can be gained directly from the sojourn while it is taking place, and/or upon individual reflection of the experience once the student returns home. Currently, Paul Smith’s College (PSC) students are able to participate in a variety of international experiences, including short-term (minimum of ten days) tours, faculty-led service learning practicums and semester-long study abroad programs, personally organized by individual students. Since there has been no central Paul Smith's College entity that examines how students may be making gains from these experiences, there exists an unmet need to discover how students believe they have benefited from study abroad. This study used grounded theory methodology and mixed qualitative research methods to investigate whether PSC students benefited personally and academically from their individual international learning experiences. This research has revealed the majority of students interviewed believed themselves to have been positively affected on both levels. These students are also more open to continuing traveling, either for personal enjoyment or career advancement. This perceived growth occurred despite, and perhaps, as a result of having experienced culture shock during their sojourns or upon their return to the U.S.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Studies
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Mckenney_FinalCapstone.docx
Authors: Sarah McKenney

Managing Growth: A Study of Succession Practices in Family Restaurants

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 21:59
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent the succession and management practice of a family-owned restaurant correlates to its success as a business. This exploratory, qualitative study will ask what do family restaurants consider to be the most successful succession planning strategies in their businesses. This study will help to better understand and identify the significance of succession practices. The methodology used will be a structured interview. The questions asked during the interview will be “yes” or “no” answers with the option to elaborate if necessary. Family restaurants are measured using interviews in Tioga County, Pennsylvania and data will be collected upon interview. Data from the interview will be analyzed and compiled together to show family restaurants optimal succession planning practices. The outcome of this study can be used by family restaurants seeking to pass down their business to younger generations.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: FINAL CAPSTONE.doc
Authors: Elizabeth Compton

Investing in Training so that Employees Feel Invested in You:

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 18:41
Abstract: Employee training can be expensive, that is why some employers may choose to cut corners on the training process. They wrongly assume the employee will learn as he/she goes. The employees who cannot learn quickly enough can become a burden to the restaurant and cause it to lose money. The purpose of this study will be to determine how and to what extent do restaurants choose their investments made in employee training to ensure employee satisfaction. This qualitative study will make the connection between the decisions restaurants make about employee training and if the decisions are made with employee satisfaction in mind. Surveys sent to the human resource managers will be the method used for this study. The human resource managers of restaurants will be asked specifically about their decisions in employee training and if the decision making process takes employee satisfaction into consideration. This study will be able to inform restaurants of employee training investments that will ensure employee satisfaction, which can improve business.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Young-Capstone.doc
Authors: Clarice Young

Food Allergic Patrons: An exploratory study of controlling allergens

Wed, 12/04/2013 - 17:21
Abstract: In the food service industry there is a consumer market and a need for allergy free options, a.k.a. safe dining options for those consumers who suffer from food allergies. Dining rooms, kitchens and other food handling departments, specifically in hotels, are not allergen free. There is a definite potential for cross-contamination somewhere amongst the flow of food handling. It could be anywhere from the receiving department to the delivery of the finished product at the consumer’s table. The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent restaurant management can control harmful food allergens and successfully stop cross-contamination. This qualitative, inductive study will explore and determine in what manner restaurant management and staff can control the spread of harmful allergens within hotels and whether or not there is a foolproof way to stop cross-contamination. Through interview research methods a detailed study on the restaurants’ food handling practices will be conducted. The researcher will interview the employees of the establishment, and through a series of specific questions created by the researcher to establish a standard grading criteria, these results will be analyzed. Once several different establishments have been interviewed and data has been collected, through careful analysis, the researcher will be able to determine if the restaurant’s staff was able to control food allergens at any point. If food establishments within hotels are concerned with making themselves safer and worry-free places for the consumer to eat, they will be interested in using the results of this study to establish safer standards and all around food practices.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Final
Authors: Evan Sullivan

The Price Tag of Ambiance

Tue, 12/03/2013 - 18:28
Abstract: The Price Tag of Ambiance is study surrounding customer’s price perception of a restaurant’s application of physical attributes of the establishment itself. Customers expect to pay for what they experience; if the price is too small, the customer tends to get concerned, too high causes a lack of patronage to the establishment. This study looks at price perception in relation to customer’s views of quality of the main aspects that define physical ambiance. Subjects for this study will be Italian restaurants and consumers ranging in ages from 18 through 45. This is beneficial for upcoming restaurateurs, as it allows more insight into what ambiance is worth to a customer, and therefore can raise their price point. This knowledge will assist restaurateurs in judging how to best utilize the physical attributes of the establishment. The study looks a survey given to the target demographic, containing photographs of several restaurants. After which, the participants will be questioned on their thoughts of price at each restaurant.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Proposal Final.doc
Authors: Adam Fisk

Impact of Wellness Policies on Public School A La Carte Food Sales

Mon, 04/22/2013 - 20:00
Abstract: While nutrition and wellness standards in schools have been a topic of concern for many nutrition experts, schools are sometimes reluctant to modify foods sold to meet healthier standards in fear it will negatively impact sales. The purpose of this quantitative, comparative study was to analyze the impact of varying types of wellness policies in Upstate New York public schools on a la carte food sales. Data was collected in the form of daily sales reports provided by school food service managers from schools with varying types of wellness policies in several Upstate New York public high schools and were compared to see the differences, similarities, and other notable patterns in sales of items sold. This will help schools in the process of producing wellness plans predict which a la carte sales will be most beneficial, as well as understand the implications of the USDA’s recently proposed guideline for school foods. This study will benefit school food services from a sales perspective while maintaining the effort to provide today’s youth with healthy options in schools.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone.docx
Authors: Amy Rogers