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Capstone Projects

Healthy Food Truck Menu, in a Festival Setting

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 15:57
Abstract: How could more nutrient dense food be served to a large number of people in a food truck, while maintaining a low cost to the customer and seller alike in an outdoor event setting? When in a music festival setting for example, there are a number of people that go without food, or eat very minimal meals that contain almost no nutritional value over the course of two to three days. Small snacks or one or two meals in two to three days can really take a toll on the body, especially in a party type of event like a music festival. One of the reasons for this is healthier food comes with a cost, the proposed menu is low cost, nutrient dense, flavor packed food that can be carried around easy by festival/ outdoor event goers. The research method used would be a survey to the panel about how much it means to them to have healthy foods or not, how much would this person be willing to spend for the healthier option, if they thought the tasting was a healthier option, and of course taste of the food. With a quick look at catering, and a great deal of information on the food truck trend, where it’s going, and what is being done. This is a chance to tie together the two of the fastest growing trends in the industry, food trucks and health food in a way that could be sold at an affordable cost to the customer, and still be cost effective to the vendor in an outdoor event setting.
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Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Logan Beem

The Vegan Experiment

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 16:43
Abstract: The vegan diet has a reputation as extremely light and unsatisfying “rabbit food.” In reality, eating a vegan diet can be satisfying to the palate and the belly. Health benefits of a vegan diet include reduced risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other chronic ailments, plus weight reduction, increased energy, and better sleep patterns. However, Americans tend to believe that they cannot get proper nutrition without animal products. Studies have shown that proper nutrition can be achieved through a whole foods plant based diet. The meal I presented was designed for carnivores to test whether they missed animal products in the dishes served.
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Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Carrie Oderman

Subtle Differences

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 19:41
Abstract: Our sense of smell and taste work together to allow us to taste and differentiate between different flavors in food. This study was designed to determine the effects of introducing aromatics during the dining experience. Can aromatics change the customer's perception of the flavors or ingredients in a dish? The method used to gather data for the study was a tasting consisting of ten taste panelists. Guest panelists were kept unaware of what the topic was until after the tasting was finished. The two plates in the first course, as well as the second course, were identically prepared so that an aroma could be introduced during the second tasting of the two courses. Each taste panelist received a tasting card containing suggestive statements regarding the texture, flavor, creativity, quality, and professionalism of the dishes presented. Based on a five level Likert-type scale, the tasting card statements required the panelists to circle numbers corresponding to what level they agreed or disagreed with each statement. The final question asked the panelists to choose what the most apparent difference was between the two dishes of each course. In both courses, flavor and ingredient were the options predominately chosen as the most apparent differences.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Alyssa Fredericks

Event Planning and What It Takes

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 21:03
Abstract: The focus of this capstone was event planning. What goes into planning an event? A professional planner needs to think about the goals, the needs of the customer, type of event, food and beverage, facilities and risk. To plan and execute an event, one must determine the type. For example, is it a corporate meeting or fundraising function? A budget is needed for each event to understand what is affordable and what can be done. What type of risk is involved? A good planner needs to plan for the “what ifs” of an event. Technology has changed the event industry. There once was a time when guests of an event would be asked to turn off their cell phones. Now everyone uses their phones at events. People can Tweet live and use social media to increase the experience of events. Planners can use social media to boost their marketing as well. Once a planner has experience in the industry they can apply to become a Certified Meeting Planner or a Certified Special Events Professional. This certification shows that the planner is an expert in their field. This capstone was planning a business plan workshop at Paul Smith’s College. This event was designed to give students a chance to develop a business plan. Potential transfer students were invited to take part in the event. During the event the students had to create a new product to market along with current senior business students who acted as their mentors. Together, they came up with a business plan and had to give an elevator speech on the product to everyone. The winning team was chosen based on the marketing, taste and idea of the product. The event was considered a success by the visitors and the college.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management, Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stephanie Dalaba

Is it possible to enhance classical Serbian cuisine by modernizing it?

Thu, 05/08/2014 - 14:05
Abstract: The research will cover the history of Serbian cuisine, how it changed during times, and in what direction could it possibly go. The starting point will be history, in order to understand what food is typically found and grown in the area, but also to discover what influences occurred during wars and migrations, and how the culture adapted to new ingredients and new cooking methods. Eventually the menu will be chosen and 5 classical Serbian dishes will be transformed. The modernized dish will have identical ingredients as the classic one but the cooking methods and the combination of flavors or texture might differ. The panel would be presented with a classical and a modern version of the chosen dish and they would be asked for their preference. The main focus of this research is not to substitute the classical dishes in any way, instead the goal is to improve them.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Marko Lalosevic

Tardigrade Abundance in Green Shield Lichens on Different Tree Species

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 18:43
Abstract: Many studies have been done on tardigrades, a microscopic, aquatic organism that feeds on plant cell fluid, bacteria, algae, protozoa, and other small invertebrates. Most of these studies have addressed their ability to survive extreme environments and not their preferred living habitats. Virtually no studies have been done investigating the ecology of tardigrades. This study focuses on which species of tardigrade live on a species of lichen (Common Greenshield Lichen, Flavoparmelia caperata) found on three species of trees; Red Maple (Acer rubrum), Black Cherry (Prunus serotina), and White Pine (Pinus strobus). Five trees of each species were chosen and five samples of the Common Greenshield Lichen were taken from all 25 trees during each of the fall and winter seasons. From every lichen sample processed, five slides were looked at, each containing two drops of the water that the lichen was suspended in for 2 hours. The samples were looked at underneath a compound microscope and a dichotomous key was used to identify tardigrades that were found. Due to the fact that liquid water is less available in winter, samples were taken during the fall and winter to look at the differences in species diversity and abundance. The greatest abundance of tardigrades was found on Red Maple, during both fall and winter. Black Cherry had the lowest abundance of tardigrades during both fall and winter. White Pine had an abundance less than that of Red Maple but greater than that of the Black Cherry. There were more tardigrades found on the lichen in fall than in winter. This implies that they find Red Maple a more suitable habitat than the Black Cherry and White Pine, may be related to acidity of the Black Cherry and White Pine being greater than that of Red Maple. Throughfall and stemflow on the trees may also contribute to habitat preference of the tardigrades.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Capstone Report.docx
Authors: Heather Cooner

New York State Feral Hog (Sus scrofa) Management Plan: Species Eradication and Public Education

Thu, 04/25/2013 - 11:22
Abstract: Feral hogs, also referred to as feral swine, Eurasian or Russian wild boar, and wild pigs, are the same species Sus scofa. They are an aggressive invasive species introduced to the United States in the 1500s and have spread over most of the country in the last few decades (Gipson et al. 1998). Due to their unique life history feral hogs are a persevering ungulate species capable of causing extensive economical and ecological damage while causing a threat to human health and safety. They are considered one of the world’s worst invasive species (Lowe et al. 2000). Extinction of native species and loss of biodiversity due to this widely invasive species has been documented worldwide (Wolf and Conover 2003). This management plan describes the life history of feral hogs, the need for management in New York State, several action plans to address the need for management, and assessment protocol for each action plan. Also included in this plan is a grant request to fund the educational objectives in order to achieve more awareness and cooperation with the public, promoting higher probability of management success.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: Feral Hog Management Plan
Authors: William Schmieder Jr.

Compaction of Hiking Trails Located in the Northeastern Area of the Adirondack State Park, New York

Mon, 04/29/2013 - 12:19
Abstract: With continued increases in outdoor recreation in the United States, the physical impact of that use needs to be monitored for its effects. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a relationship exists between traffic numbers and soil strength of trails in the High Peaks Region of New York’s Adirondack state park. Soil strength was used as a measure of compaction because of its ability to indicate certain aspects of soil physical properties like bulk density, and hydrological condition (Mirreh & Ketcheson,1972), which are also soil physical properties that are effected by compaction (Hanna & Al-Kaisi,2009). These physical properties are important factors which influence a soils ability to carry out its biotic and abiotic processes (Kozlowski,1999). Initially the relationship between average soil strength of trails and traffic was insignificant. Upon further analyzing the data we found a significant relationship between on-trail and off-trail soil strength and used this relationship to create on-trail residual soil strengths. This was done to remove the influence that off-trail soil strength was having on the traffic vs. soil strength relationship. With the on/off-trail relationship influence removed, the relationship between on-trail residual soil strength and traffic was significantly improved. Literature discussed showed how the soil strengths collected could be used to infer possible effects on the sites tested. Relations between soil strength and bulk density, root elongation, root penetration, and trail recovery were all reviewed to provide insight on the quality of the soil at sample sites.
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Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Karl Van Osch

No Known Antidote: Quantification of a deadly toxin, tetrodotoxin, in red efts (Notopthalamus viridescens; Rafinesgue, 1820)

Mon, 04/29/2013 - 17:42
Abstract: Tetrodotoxin (TTX) in found in taxa worldwide including the eft life stage of the eastern newt (Notopthalamus virisdescens). Previous studies have shown that there is variability of TTX concentrations within efts and newts, and it is not known if the presence of TTX in these efts is common among populations. Our objective was to determine the distribution of TTX within the body N. viridescens efts. We hypothesized that the skin would have the highest concentrations of TTX as it is the area of the body that will likely come into contact with a predator. If certain regions of the skin come into contact with a predator more often than others, there may be significant differences in the dorsal, abdominal and pectoral regions of skin. Further, we hypothesized that the ova would have the second highest concentration of TTX as they are vital to reproduction yet vulnerable to predation. Through HPLC analysis we determined the concentrations of TTX within different tissues of N. viridescens efts including the: dorsal, pectoral, and abdominal skin; ovaries; testes; liver; pancreas; and alimentary canal. The concentrations of TTX between the different tissue types are not significantly different, nor were individuals significantly different in concentration of TTX from one another. Toxicity levels were high in comparison to other N. viridescens efts and more similar to the toxicity of highly toxic Taricha newts. The high toxicity of N. viridescens could be contributed to strong predation pressure by the slightly resistant garter snake (Thamnopsis sirtalis) and eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos).
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology
Year: 2013
Authors: Kimberly M. Forrest

The Conservation and Management of Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Populations in Northern Idaho to Help Prevent Human Caused Extirpation from the Contiguous United States

Thu, 05/02/2013 - 11:21
Abstract: Wolverines (Gulo gulo) were once a thriving species in the North Western United States, but large scale trapping and poison programs in the early 1900s lead to the species near extinction. Since then, populations in the United States have been struggling to maintain a strong presence in Idaho. Its current listing as threatened on the Endangered Species Act prohibits hunting and trapping, but more management is needed to sustain populations. Human development and recreation activities have caused wolverines to disperse from its nature range. Using habitat preservation techniques on current and historical wolverine habitat, increase availability and connectivity will improve dispersal. Close relationship with state officials will provide protection regarding land use, recreation, hunting, trapping and harassment. Public education will teach residents ways they can help prevent wolverine populations from further decline. Extensive research and population monitoring are needed due to the currently declining populations and the low fecundity of the species.
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Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2013
Authors: Danielle E. Ball