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Capstone Projects

Comparison of Industry Standard 5/16” Maple Sap Tubing Versus 3/16” Maple Sap Tubing Regarding Overall Yields for the 2014-2015 Maple Syrup Season at Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center, Paul Smiths, New York.

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 20:17
Abstract: Obtaining the highest yields during a growing season has long been the utmost interest by maple syrup producers across the northeast. Methods have been introduced such as different tubing sizes starting at 7/16” tubing to the industry standard 5/16” tubing, however recently the newest tubing on the market is 3/16” tubing. Theoretically the new 3/16” tubing would provide the highest overall yields in comparison to 5/16” tubing by increasing the amount of vacuum present under a natural gravity system. The study of examining the flow of maple sap between two tubing types consists of two sugar bushes located at the Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center in Paul Smiths, New York in the Adirondack Park. The two sugar bushes were constructed on similar landscapes providing the same of the following I.) Slope, II.) Size of trees, III.) Growing conditions, and IV.) Number of taps. Measurements of canopy cover and tree diameter were also compared to determine the overall health of both plots. The analysis showed that both canopy cover and tree diameter were less in 3/16” tubing however more sap still was produced in 3/16” tubing. The test compared 5/16” tubing versus 3/16” tubing in regards to overall seasonal yields. The overall seasonal yields for both 3/16” and 5/16” were measured in gallons from two separate locations. 3/16” tubing yielded more overall, ending with a total volume collected of 324.75 gallons of sap, while the standard 5/16” tubing yielded 296.5 gallons.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2015
Authors: Joshua Brewer

A LOOK INTO THE SOCIAL, MENTAL, AND PHYSICAL SHIFTS IN RECREATION BASED ON PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE TRENDS

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 09:47
Abstract: The purpose of our study was to try and understand the current recreational trends that are happening in the United States of America, and ultimately try and predict what future trends of recreation will be. We took on this study by starting with the history of recreation beginning with the ancient Greeks, and the history of sports. Then we looked at current trends going on in the United Sates such as demographic, economic, social factors, and continuities in leisure and recreation. Upon gathering all of our information and statistics we analyzed what those trends are and where they might be potentially leading to in the field of recreation. We will be concentrating primarily on time, space, money, skills, choice, technology, mental health, physical health, and accessibility.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Capstone
Authors: Timothy Quarles, Chad Bates, Benjamin Bishop

Feasibility of placing a visitor cabin on the VIC cross country ski trails near Jenkins Mountain

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:25
Abstract: The feasibility of placing a visitor cabin on the Paul Smith’s College Visitor interpretive center is the topic of this paper. Feedback from visitors including students, faculty and staff of Paul Smith’s college and the public was gathered by an electronic survey. This data was then compiled into graphs on excel to add a visual to the results. The visitor interpretive center or VIC as it will be referred to in the paper, has expressed interest in creating a cabin to cabin system or hut to hut system. This system would be modeled after those in Europe and what is currently in place on the Appalachian Trail in the United States. As the results show there is interest in a cabin being built on the VIC lands, this cabin would be a rustic structure and built near long pond. It would then be the VIC’s intention to charge a small fee to rent the cabin out at night. Once the cabin demonstrated success and interest the VIC would be open to establishing another cabin for similar uses as well as connecting the current trails to other trails in the area to create more opportunities for visitors.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2015
Authors: John Pokrzywka, Joseph Brod

Presence and Abundance of Microplastics within Flowing Waters of Private, Wilderness, and Other Forest Preserve Lands of the Northern Adirondack Park

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 16:26
Abstract: Microplastic sampling was conducted at thirteen locations throughout the water bodies of the Northern Adirondack Region. Plastics were found at all thirteen sites, which were categorized by the impact level of human development. Any particle less than 5mm can be defined as a microplastic particle. Microscopic plastics can be found in a variety of chemical cleaners, clothing fabrics, and concrete solutions. Storm water drainage systems and wastewater treatment plants are confirmed sources of microplastic pollution, which carry pollutants into our rivers, lakes, and streams. Ingestion of microplastic particles can lead to many distinctive threats, including biological and physical abnormalities, while possibly leading to bioaccumulation and biomagnification throughout the food web. Future practices for management and prevention of microplastic pollutants in the Adirondacks is critical for environmental protection, while also portraying a worldly view of an overlooked human induced issue.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Patrick Colern, Sinjin Larson

Craft Beer Distribution

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 12:22
Abstract: Craft beer is distributed in many different places. The purpose of this research is to show how the breweries want to expand on getting out more and different varieties of beers to be sold outside of breweries. This study will use case interviews with existing craft brewers. Included in the interviews will be inquiries on where and why the beer is distributed to certain distribuitors that they have selected. Of the five breweries interviewed, it will explore and give insight on how well the beer is distributed. Beer distribution is huge for breweries and to be able to keep up with what is popularity and explore new varieties will help show if the company is going to be profitable or not.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
File Attachments: beer project.docx
Authors: Kacie McKeown

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities at the Paul Smith’s College VIC

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 15:41
Abstract: The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) says that public facilities, including such places as parks and recreation trails need to be accessible to everyone., Barnum Brook Trail at the Visitor's Interpretive Center (VIC) is considered a mobility challenged accessible trail. Researching other parks throughout the United States can help determine if making this trail at the VIC accessible for persons with a number of disabilities will be beneficial. The other trails will help define who and how big the potential market is for accessible trails. These trails can show us different aspects that exist at other parks, such as Braille signage, ramps and lifts, that we could bring to the Barnum Brook trail and the rest of the VIC. Current such trails include John Dillon Park in upstate New York, in Colorado: Coyote Valley Trails, Sprague Lake, and Lily Lake, Arlington Lions Club Park in Florida, and Papago Park in Arizona. Interviewing people in the surrounding area including those that are providing services to persons with different disabilities at ARC and North Star Industries can help determine if groups of people would be willing to come spend a day enjoying the VIC facilities and trails.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Stacy Cavanaugh

Extracurricular Activities and Academic Success

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 12:20
Abstract: This report investigates whether student activities has an impact on academic success. The student activities were broken into five categories: on campus clubs and organizations, off campus clubs and organizations, team sports, independent athletics, and jobs. While this subject has been studied before, results tend to differ widely due to college type or sample size. In order to study this on Paul Smith’s College campus, a survey was sent to students containing questions regarding their GPA and in what activities from the five categories they regularly participated. There were 120 responses to the survey. Out of those 120 students, 83 percent reported that they did participate in student activities. Of that 83 percent, 76 percent of students stated that they felt extracurricular activities had helped improve their performance in their academic studies. Of the 83 percent, 45 percent had a 3.5 to 4.0 GPA. While this does seem to support that extracurricular activities has a positive effect on academics, it is uncertain whether students who are more determined and academically inclined are the ones more likely to do extracurricular activities. That would be a topic for further study.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Food Service and Beverage Management
Year: 2014
Authors: Melissa Tiedt

Alpine Ecosystems on Ski Area Summits in the Northeast: A Best Management Practices Manual

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 15:19
Abstract: Over the past half a century, anthropogenic climate change has triggered temperatures in the northeastern United States to rise. This increase has led to decreased winter precipitation and a longer annual growing season. Species found in upland/montane habitats on the southern edge of their range limits are particularly threatened by these changes. Warmer temperatures have allowed larger woody plants to advance up mountain slopes, entering the habitat of these fragile species. In the next decade, we will witness a complete disappearance of alpine flora from several locations across the northeast including Whiteface in New York, Sugarloaf in Maine and Mount Mansfield in Vermont. Managers of ski resorts can therefore play an important role in promoting the continued persistence of high-altitude flora and fauna through carefully considered management decisions can also serve to promote the reputation of the ski industry as stewards of mountaintop ecosystems. Doing so will allow for continued study of the species that exist within these communities, the protection of biodiversity, and increased revenue for the resort itself through elevated public image and mountain-top tourism. To help begin these conservation efforts, we have created a best management practice (BMP) manual to guide ski area managers in making these developments. It includes techniques for sustainable slope, soil, vegetation and wildlife management, erosion control, artificial snow production, and ski slope construction and design. Also included are marketing techniques and an overview of the economic viability of the practices outlined in this manual.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
Authors: Pali Gelsomini, Dylan Randall

Is Green Construction Economically Feasible

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 14:12
Abstract: Green construction is a valuable part of our developing world. Building green will help reduce the negative effects of pollution in our atmosphere. It will also help reduce electrical uses throughout the household and allow you to have a reduction in costs to paying electrical bills. Too many, this process is considered to be expensive to build this way. Products that green homes are made of are considered to be expensive. The materials for energy production are also considered expensive. Too address this, a survey was conducted to see the views of individuals and what they believe it costs to have a green home. The survey also asked if people would consider having a green home if they had the option. It is proven having a green home will reduce the costs of a home eventually leading to paying nothing for maintaining a house called a payback period. To build green will mean to pay less over time and maybe eventually lead to getting paid. There are also many government incentives for building green. The government can invest in this building so you may afford a green building. It is well advised to be educated in all aspects of building green such as the tax incentives, payback periods, environmental effects, and how to approach this.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
File Attachments: final Capstone Draft.docx
Authors: Daniel Hourihan, Zachary Mein

Python Scripting an ArcGIS Add-in for Wildlife Telemetry Data Processing

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 15:46
Abstract: There are currently no modern open source alternatives to commercial radio telemetry processing software. I developed a python add-in for ArcGIS which allows for interactive editing of telemetry data. The add-in was tested for functionality, accuracy and usability. Functionality was tested according to how closely it adhered to the original software requirements specification. Accuracy was tested by generating telemetry data from known animal locations and comparing the estimated locations to the actual locations. Usability was tested through speak aloud user tests. User data was collected on completion status, time of completion, and number usability issues found. The intended functionality goals were met and exceeded. Accuracy was less than expected with an average inaccuracy distance of 202 meters and approximately 10% of the bearing groups were unable to generate a centroid. During user testing, a total of 33 usability issues were discovered that hindered use of the software and on average it took a student 18 minutes to process one data set without prior exposure to the add-in. Qualitative observations from the user tests could be a launching point for GIS usability studies. In addition, the core modules could be modified and expanded into a separate application with dependency on Quantum-GIS or Geographic Analysis Support System (GRASS).
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2014
File Attachments: Kacir_2014.docx
Authors: Robert Kacir