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Capstone Projects

A Study of Pure and Artificial Maple Syrup Production

Sun, 05/08/2016 - 22:40
Abstract: Many people claim that they can tell the difference between pure and artificial maple syrup. However, pure and artificial maple syrup are made through two completely different processes. Through the method of a blind taste test, I want to answer the question whether or not consumers can in fact tell the difference between pure and artificial maple syrup when both served as is or baked into products through a catered breakfast. At the catered breakfast the following dishes were served: maple glazed doughnuts, breakfast casserole, sausage gravy and biscuits, pancakes with maple butter and maple syrup, vanilla and maple yogurt, and sliced fruit. There were two options to choose from for the maple glazed doughnuts, maple butter, maple syrup, and maple yogurts. One choice was made with pure maple syrup, the second choice was made with artificial maple syrup; the consumers did not know which option was made with which maple syrup. At the end of the breakfast, I asked each guest to complete a survey that would let me know which option they believed to be made with the pure maple syrup and which option they believed to be made with the artificial maple syrup.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Final Written Paper.pdf
Authors: Amanda Gail Wetter

Home Grown Kitchen: Catering Boomerang

Fri, 05/06/2016 - 17:11
Abstract: Home Grown Kitchen is a baking capstone project that is focused around farm-to-table and the Adirondack cuisine. The Adirondack cuisine has a prominent focus on farm-to-table, and we wanted to incorporate that into catering the Boomerang event. Boomerang is an event that is held on campus to network future graduates of Paul Smith’s College with alumni. Farm-to-table seemed to be appropriate for alumni coming back into the Adirondack park. By using local farms and vendors we were able to create a solid menu that would be appealing to everyone, and easily eaten while mingling with students and alumni. The main question is whether farm-to-table in the Adirondacks is easy or difficult, while using baking applications. By contacting local vendors, researching what grows during the seasons, and having conversations with chefs on campus to help us along the way, Boomerang had becoming a successful event to cater.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
File Attachments: Catering Boomerang
Authors: Cassie Brown

Home Grown Kitchen - A study of how easy or difficult it is to use Farm-to-Table for a large catering event in the Adirondack's in the spring season with baking and pastry applications

Fri, 05/06/2016 - 17:00
Abstract: Cassie Brown and I catered the Boomerang alumni networking event on campus on April 7th. Our capstone questions was “how easy or difficult is it to cater an event in the Adirondacks in the springtime using Farm-to-Table with baking and pastry applications.” We learned that it is difficult, but not by any means impossible. Catering is something that Cassie and I are both interested in so this topic was perfect for us. Cassis and I were able to help connect local farmers with local customers, raise Farm-to-Table awareness, meet and interact with alumni, and show the Paul Smith’s College community our skills and what we have learned throughout our four years here at Paul Smith’s College.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Victoria Gregory

Rooted Education: learning from aquaponics

Sat, 04/30/2016 - 15:02
Abstract: Aquaponics is the integration of soil-less agriculture (hydroponics) within closed-loop aquaculture systems to reduce the toxic accumulation of nutrient waste from aquatic animals. Bacteria naturally establish to purify water by oxidizing the ammonia secreted by fish, which reduces the toxicity of effluent while creating a usable nitrogen source for plants. The conversion of ammonia and nitrite into nitrate by living bacteria communities is called a biological filter, or biofiltration (FAO 2014). Aquaponics would not be possible without biofiltration; the slightest amount of ammonia would be fatally toxic to fish, and plants wouldn't receive the nitrates they need to grow. There are unique opportunities offered by an aquaponics system to learn about ecological and human communities. 1.1. Aquaponics enables users to grow fish and agricultural plants with limited space and resource use (water, soil, and time). This enables an aquaponics user to invest less physical energy and time into expanding sustainable food resources for their household use. 1.2. A small aquaponics system could promote cultural values of self-sufficiency, energy consciousness, and connection to food systems. It could inspire individual efforts to produce food for one’s household, to build healthier and more resilient systems, and a greater appreciation for farming. Therefore, this project aims to actualize a mobile and functional aquaponics system for the educational benefit of the Paul Smith's College community. I will provide the background knowledge needed to maintain an aquaponics system, as well as describe the general concept of aquaponics design.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Sustainability Studies
Year: 2016
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Brian Jason Kohan

Outward Bound semester: Skills to last a life time

Wed, 12/14/2016 - 10:44
Abstract: The focus of this study will examine the level at which an Outward Bound semester fosters personal growth, connection with nature, and hard skills. This particular Outward Bound semester course traveled from the Florida Keys then on to Costa Rica and Panama in Central America. The course focused on the water elements of sailing, surfing, whitewater rafting, scuba diving, and sea kayaking. Methods used include personal journal reflections, peer and instructors oral and written responses. The researcher was an active participant in the immersive experience and kept a journal of the entire experience trying to gather as much information about the course itself and reflecting on the research process throughout. This research indicated that this experience developed personal character and a connection with nature. These skills have an impact deeper than an isolated course with Outward Bound but can be transferred to daily life.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2016
Authors: Sam Annable

Building Families Stronger

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:05
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to design a program that can be implemented in local camps to accommodate the needs of individuals in a family group affected by mental illness. The study will explain the importance of educating individuals about mental illness and integrating supportive behaviors. This program is designed to help families cope with the effects mental illness can have on the entire family dynamic. Families are often the strongest support system for dealing with mental illness and educating families is essential for success of the mentally ill. Team building games are used to enhance social behaviors and encourage group bonding, this program uses a recreational therapeutic approach to addressing issues in the lives of those affected by mental illness. To figure out how many people will be most likely be using the therapy program, a survey was created using a series of questions that went with the topic for respondents to answer. In fact the survey established that the majority of people agree on recreational approach to therapy as a means of coping with their illness in real life tasks. Other questions asked was what their favorite activities where, such as paddle sports and hiking. Another question was what disability was so as to get an idea what accommodations would be need and services for patients involved with the program.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Environmental Science, Parks, Recreation and Facilities Management
Year: 2015
Authors: Courtney Berg, Douglas Menge, Ashley Beldock

Removing Barriers: Student’s Use of the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 12/08/2015 - 16:56
Abstract: The Paul Smith’s College’s Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) has been a staple in the lives of locals and tourists of the Adirondacks. The VIC offers nature-based recreational and educational programs year-round with the assistance of Paul Smith’s College’s students, faculty and staff. The purpose of this research is to take a deeper look into the present barriers preventing the Paul Smith’s College community (student, faculty and staff) from accessing and utilizing the VIC’s building and its trail system. A study was performed to discover barriers to accessing in the VIC area by utilizing surveys, focus groups, on-site visits, program implementation, trail register log, previous recreation capstones, and online resources. The results were analyzed to concentrate specific barriers. Most barriers involved programing, such as expanding current programs, as well as, offering new programs, followed by accessing the VIC, such as adequate signage and map interpretation, and finally access to general information, such as advertising and marketing. Using research from the past and present, this project gives suggestions that would better serve the PSC community by clarifying the needs and desires of the appropriate stakeholders associated with the VIC.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
Authors: Phillip Brandel

Initiatives to Increase Student Use of the Visitor Interpretive Center: A focus on marketing

Mon, 12/07/2015 - 09:18
Abstract: The focus of this study was on marketing the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) to students and faculty with an overarching goal of increasing student use of the VIC. Through the study market research was conducted to identify the desired programming of the student body and methods of reaching students. Desired programs were then implemented and promoted alongside current programs. Program evaluations were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the marketing research and methods of promotion. Focus groups were held to allow a deeper insight on the preferences of different styles of promotion and the effectiveness of VIC brochures geared towards incoming students and faculty. The results of the study should be used in the future to increase communication between upper level management, and students and faculty regarding VIC resources and programming. The VIC is a resource for education, interpretation, and recreation that is underutilized and could be increasingly influential in the years to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
File Attachments:
Authors: Paige Buchholz

Looking Forward at Outdoor Recreational Opportunities at the Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 10:57
Abstract: The Paul Smiths College Visitor Interpretation Center (VIC) has been a major contributor to the lives of locals and tourists of the Adirondacks. The VIC provides recreational and educational programs for the surrounding area to enjoy and learn from. It is located about a mile down Route 30 from Paul Smith’s College. The purpose of this research is to look deeper into the VIC viewing is past, present and possible future programing with regards to the art, invasive species, climate change, digital media and recreation. Using surveys, interviews, on site visits, previous related capstones and online resources a study has been done looking into the present and past to what the VIC could possibly unfold for future programing. The purpose of this capstone is to do an analysis of the Visitor Interpretation Center (VIC) in regards to recreation. To begin, we looked into the history of recreation in the Adirondacks as a whole to get some background information. We then did research on what recreational pursuits were offered in the past at the VIC, up to present day. Surveys were conducted and personal observations and interviews were done to get information on the current status of outdoor recreation at the VIC. Using information from the past and present, alongside of a needs assessment of the VIC, our project shows what is most desired for future recreational programing at the VIC. This information will be presented to stakeholders of the VIC for past reflections as well as ideas to move forward.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Full Paper.docx
Authors: Nathanial Casaregola, Steven Farrell

Impacts of Maple Syrup Production Programming at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 12:37
Abstract: Education and interpretation provides strategies and techniques to successfully communicate natural resource and environmental concerns. This research addresses the effectiveness of a community education project at the Paul Smith’s College (PSC) Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) in the Adirondacks of New York State. Educational programs regarding maple syrup production were designed and evaluated to determine their impact on the local community. The objectives were to offer skills education, raise awareness on a local resource, foster a connection to the land, and offer involvement in the VIC’s community maple project. The goal of maple education at the VIC is to educate the community in an attempt to encourage the growth of an underutilized sustainable local resource that community members can become involved in without degradation of Adirondack forests. Determinations were made using a survey questionnaire provided before and after the programs were performed. Based on the data collected the determination made is that the majority of participants that attended ultimately were interested in becoming involved in maple sugaring using to VIC as a gateway for maple sugaring, primarily as a hobby and outdoor activity. This research has aided in the determination that effective programming at the VIC results in encouraging the community to be involved in maple syrup production. With this determination the VIC will continue to perform the designed educational programs as a service to the community.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Integrative Studies, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2014
Authors: Thomas Manitta