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Capstone Projects

Management of an Alaskan Breeding subspecies of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica baueri)

Fri, 05/06/2016 - 13:48
Abstract: Avian species with extremely long distance seasonal migration routes presents interesting challenges when developing a management plan. The migration bar-tailed godwit (Limosa lapponica baueri) takes it to New Zealand and Australia as the wintering grounds, spring migration staging grounds in the coastal regions of the Yellow Sea, and the northern and western shores of Alaska for breeding. Godwits, as with other large shorebirds that breed in arctic and subarctic uplands, have high annual adult survival and low reproductive success. This makes the adult life stage the most important in terms of management strategies. Adult survival faces many threats, but most of all the increased harvest rates, rapid decrease in habitat within the staging grounds and threats from the onset of climate change. Governments must enforce existing legislation to prevent the harvest of godwits in their staging grounds and protect adults traveling to the breeding grounds in Alaska.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2016
Authors: Joseph Faryniarz

Food Allergies, Dietary Restrictions, and the Foodservice Industry

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 22:59
Abstract: For modern culinary professionals, food allergies and restricted diets present one of the biggest challenges in daily work. Ranging from an anaphylaxis-triggering peanut allergy to a preference for avoiding meat on Fridays, dietary restrictions and food sensitivities cover a wide variety of potential hurdles, and potentially inspirational guidelines, which foodservice professionals must navigate in order to be successful. On one side, a rise in the number of those with allergies or dietary restrictions presents an added challenge, but on the other, it presents an opportunity. Diners with such restrictions are becoming more and more comfortable with going out to dinner; that there will be some accommodation is now expected by consumers, rather than hoped for. The definition of “food allergy,” according to the Mayo Clinic, is “an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food.” However, according to many experienced foodservice workers, the definition is “an annoying request from a customer who’s probably lying, anyway.” Of the many challenges contemporary chefs, culinarians, and food service professionals face, food preparation and service for those with allergies and restricted diets is one of the most prevalent, as well as one of the most misunderstood. Foodservice professionals will tell you that some of the most [annoying, silly, overblown, difficult, frightening] requests they receive while working are for special adjustments to accommodate a food allergy. When a chef is asked if the signature pasta dish can be made without gluten, his reaction is too often a mix of ire, disgust, and even embarrassment. Should a patron make a simple request that his or her food be prepared away from peanuts, images of anaphylactic shock and ambulances in the parking lot dance demonically through the front-of-house manager’s head. Such requests, however, seem to be popping up more and more often in our world. According to the CDC, “The prevalence of food allergies among children increased 18% during 1997-2007.” About 15 million Americans suffer from food allergies, as well as about 18 million Europeans. With such a rapid increase in those numbers, one would think the opportunity to impress customers with special diets might make a chef happy, rather than feeling as though he has been offended. The patience of chefs grows thinner still, however, when such requests are not a matter of health, but a matter of preference. For those who, for various reasons, adhere to a vegetarian or plant-based diet, or who follow certain religious dietary restrictions such as Islamic Halaal, finding a restaurant where the staff is ready and willing to accommodate can sometimes be difficult. For contemporary food handlers, ethics and morality play a massive role in serving such customers. A vegetarian diner, for example, may not know that the house minestrone soup is made with chicken stock in place of vegetable stock. Even after eating the soup, that customer will likely never know. In such situations, the decision to serve certain foods comes down to how much respect for his or her customers a chef has. It is my belief that the largest contributing factor towards the negative feelings chefs harbor over dietary restrictions is a lack of education and experience in handling such requests. Things unknown have always been a source of anxiety for a majority of human kind. That anxiety is why we are explorers and innovators; we subconsciously want to make things known. In order for foodservice professionals to handle the large number of diners who now request special items, it is necessary that they be educated from the earliest stages of their careers to expect, to accept, to interpret, and to enjoy working with those types of challenges. By doing so, the food and beverage industry will be a much more friendly world for all consumers, and a much more profitable one for all industry professionals.
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Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nathaniel Swain

Cheese

Tue, 05/05/2015 - 17:05
Abstract: This culminating experience happens in two phases. Throughout the semester, students have been taking on the role of Executive Chef in our Palm Restaurant. They have each created a menu, ordered food supplies, developed budgetary proposal, and assigned duties pertaining to food production and front of house service. Each dinner took on a different food related theme that the students researched and developed. This poster session provides the students to describe their process, their findings, and what they learned from the experience. My theme was based on cheese.
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Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Lisa McCartney

A Global Recovery Plan for the Endangered Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus)

Tue, 04/28/2015 - 16:11
Abstract: Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) are the largest baleen whale species on the planet, and currently the biggest animal in existence. In the early 20th century, blue whales were nearly exterminated by whaling fleets until they received worldwide protection in 1967. Since then, the global populations of blue whales have had difficulty recovering due to their slow population growth rate and existing threats. Most of these populations are below 2,000 individuals with exception of a population off the coast of California, which has shown slight recovery in the past decade. The management of the blue whale depends on solutions that are addressed with long-term considerations, thus management will need to be continued for multiple decades in order to increase these global populations.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Matthew Fuirst

American Lobster (Homarus americanus) Management in the inshore and offshore waters of Maine

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 14:39
Abstract: The goal of this management plan is to maintain a healthy and sustainable lobster population that can support the pressures of a profitable commercial fishery. The Maine lobster fishery is the second leading industry in Maine with recent annual profits of over 456 million dollars earned by less than the 6,000 commercial lobster fisherman within the state (DMR, 2015). The fishery has had record landings in the last decade and the fishery stock seems to be thriving. With the collapse of the Maine ground fish, shrimp, and scallop fishery many commercial fisherman have fallen back on one of the few fisheries that seems to have a promising future in the state. Some potential threats to the fishery are the increase number of fisherman in the offshore lobster fishery, the falling price per pound of lobster, and the growing risk of the spread of shell disease. To make drastic regulatory changes to the fishery at this time would be met with strong opposition by the stakeholders but increases in funding to expand on research and marketing initiatives to protect the future of the fishery has much more of a likelihood of being supported by the stakeholders of the Maine lobster fishery.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Brandon Bezio

Recovery Plan for the Reintroduction and Establishment of a Viable Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Population in Colorado

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 18:39
Abstract: After their near or complete elimination from the western United States in the early 1900’s, wolverine (Gulo gulo) began to recolonize small areas of their historic distribution in the northern portion of the Rocky Mountains during the latter part of the century. Though wolverine have not been recorded in the state since 1919 with the exception of a single dispersing male, Colorado still contains a large area of suitable wolverine habitat. Analysis of critical habitat characteristics revealed that Colorado’s wolverine habitat could support 21% of wolverine population capacity in the contiguous United States. This large area has the potential to serve as a core source population of wolverine to supplement periphery sink populations and provide population resiliency in the face of climate change or extreme mortality events. Despite the abundance of suitable habitat, the establishment of a viable wolverine population will require reintroduction, rather than relying upon extreme dispersal events of individuals from established populations. Keeping human-wolverine conflicts to a minimum, protecting potential denning sites from development, increasing and maintaining connectivity between wolverine habitats, and supplementing individuals from other populations to maintain genetic diversity within the relatively isolated habitat in Colorado will be critical for the persistence of this species. The utilization of this management plan can ensure that all ecological, socio-economic, and regulatory factors associated with wolverine reintroduction in Colorado can be effectively addressed to promote the success of wolverine recovery in the contiguous United States.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Ashley Evans

Feral Pig Management for New York 2015-2025

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 20:40
Abstract: A population of feral pigs (Sus scrofa) has established a breeding population in New York State. These pigs have been escaping from hunting preserves throughout the state and have adapted to the habitat well. Feral pigs can cause a lot of property damage and also take out farmers’ fields by erosion or trampling the crops. There is a big problem with feral pigs in the southern United States and have grown in great numbers with great impact on the ecosystems. Feral pigs are an invasive species that have no population controlling predators and can reproduce rapidly. The pigs also compete with native species for food and habitat and can force native species to relocate to find more food. Pigs eat anything from bulbs and roots to eating rodents, frogs and deer. The pigs can also cause erosion of landscapes which can lead to nutrients washing away from the soil. Removal of feral pigs in the south has been ongoing for years without any success and their population is growing rapidly. Therefore, action must be taken now to stop the spread of feral pigs in New York before their population gets out of control. In order to reach this goal of complete eradication, different actions of removal need to be taken. Some of the actions that will be used to remove pigs will be trapping and setting out feeders with toxins in it designed for feral pigs. The other action that will be needed is creating regulations for hunting preserves that prevent pigs from escaping. If nothing is done now then the feral pig populations in New York will keep growing and lead to the same issues as southern states.
Access: Yes
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
File Attachments: Management_Paper3.doc
Authors: Cody Fuller

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) Management Plan for the Western United States

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 11:14
Abstract: Executive Summary Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) can be found throughout the western United States in large meta-populations. Their population is currently stable but is being threatened by energy companies. The golden eagle population is currently growing about two percent a year. Within the past ten years, 70% of golden eagle deaths have been caused by human-related activities. Electrocution and interactions with wind turbines are the two primary causes of golden eagle deaths. Currently, there are not many actions being utilized to decrease the number of human-related deaths. Therefore, actions must be taken in order to reduce the number of human-related deaths in the western United States. The goal of this management plan is to maintain a self-sustaining golden eagle population. Actions such as decreasing the number of deaths by electrocution and wind turbines, and increasing the number of captive released subadults into the wild will help to decrease human-related deaths. Failure to act will likely result in the decline of golden eagles.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Travis Stoll

Comparison of Fish Assemblages between Impacted and Minimally Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 11:49
Abstract: One of the least understood aspects of aquatic ecology is the role of the riparian zones of lakes, and how these habitats and their functions are impacted by human development of lakeshores. Nine impacted and six minimally impacted shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake were classified with respect to the existing littoral coarse woody structure (CWS) and fish assemblages. There was a significant difference in normalized coarse woody debris ranking between the impacted and minimally impacted sites based upon the results of a Mann-Whitney non-parametric test. The minimally impacted sites exhibited a higher coarse woody structure ranking on average when compared to the impacted sample sites. Coarse woody structure in littoral zones plays a pivotal role in the feeding behaviors and survival of young fishes. The lack of coarse woody debris in littoral zones not only impacts the littoral structure of lakes, but can have a cascading effect on the overall health and productivity of lake ecosystems. Fish densities between the minimally impacted and impacted sites were not significantly different. While no significant difference was observed for the fish densities, the timing and limited sampling periods for this study may have influenced the low observed abundance of fish sampled. The low abundance of sampled fishes can also potentially be attributed to a poor year of recruitment to the fish populations in Lower St. Regis Lake. Further refinement of the field methods for sampling could improve the effectiveness of the study and result in a conclusive description of shoreline degradation in lake systems. The results of this study could be used to develop preliminary methods for monitoring or assessing shoreline degradation and its impacts on fish assemblages that rely upon natural littoral zones. Future management and regulations regarding the development and degradation of both riparian and shoreline zones along lakes can prevent a disastrous decline in fish populations and lake productivity throughout the Adirondack Park.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
Authors: Jacob Ball

Northern New England and New York Mountain Lion Recolonization Management Plan

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 12:33
Abstract: Mountain lions (Puma concolor) were a common species found in the United States during the 1800s. Currently there are no breeding populations of mountain lions known to exist in the northeastern section of the United States. This loss of the species was due to human development and over harvesting that was facilitated by bounties. Humans have had a direct contribution to the loss of the species throughout this part of the country. Colonial expansion of farms into wild areas caused a negative connotation to mountain lions when predation occurred on livestock. This is what led to their local extinction. Today mountain lion populations are in great abundance throughout South America, western United States and Canada, and eastern portions of New Brunswick, Canada. Habitat degradation reduced suitable habitat and has pushed mountain lions to new geographic ranges. Ranging males have occurred in eastern United States in search of females and are increasing in quantity. This raises a question to whether breeding populations could be supported in the northeast. Due to state and federally owned land, there is suitable habitat located in the northeast. Help will be needed to facilitate the recolonization of this species. The goals of this management plan are to re-establish population sizes large enough for reproduction and satisfy stakeholders. To meet the goals for this management plan, four objectives must be met (1) Agreements must be made with landowners of property of 100 acres and larger in Northern New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine by 2020 that allows these lands to be protected for mountain lion use, (2) regulation of population numbers will be implemented by hunting harvest quota that will cause declines when population reaches two lions per square mile, (3) current average auction prices for livestock that are killed due to mountain lion predation will be provided to the owners, and (4) mountain lion, along with other large predator education will be provided to children in elementary school. This management plan requires extensive work in monitoring recolonizing mountain lion populations along with aiding with interactions that occur between mountain lions and humans. The overall goal of this plan is to re-establish a breeding mountain lion population within the northeast of the United States.
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Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2015
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Zachary Beauregard