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Capstone Projects

“I’m a server, not a doctor. You’re allergic to what?” The need for expansion of food allergy training practices within the food service industry specifically focused on front of the house employees.

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 14:18
Abstract: The number of food allergy sufferers in the United States has dramatically increased in the last 15 years. It is estimated that approximately 15 million individuals in the United States have food related allergies; of that 15 million, an estimated 6 million are children. Due to the high percentage of customers with food related allergies, the restaurant industry has been forced to adjust to the needs of clientele to maintain a diverse customer base. This study seeks to determine if a food allergy training course should be instituted in the food service industry. Survey data will be gathered from restaurants in the Lake Placid/Saranac Lake region of New York to determine current training policies, level of knowledge, and communication procedures. Furthermore, the study will investigate if a food allergy training course is present at each restaurant surveyed. If not, the level of training staff have and overall knowledge regarding food allergies will also be examined. The results will then be compiled to generate a report of recommendations regarding the need for a food allergy training course and the information that should be considered within the course. The goal of this project is to ensure sufficient education for restaurant staff, providing exceptional service and safety for all clients.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: O'REILLY FINAL CAPSTONE.doc
Authors: Ashley O'Reilly

Beyond The Links: A Study of Golf Tourism Amenities

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 19:48
Abstract: Golf tourism is a continually growing trend within the golf industry. This capstone determined to what extent amenities play a factor in the choosing of destinations by golf tourists, this relational study will explain the possible relationship between amenities and choice of destination by golf tourists. The availability of amenities relates to tourist choices of vacation destination for golf tourists was determined by this capstone. Data was collected through online surveys distributed to golf tourists. The activity that this study included was surveying and data collection. The data that was collected returned in the form of scales which will make for easier data analysis. This study has yielded data that would be useful for many communities around the country that have a golf aspect to their economy. Some possible organizations that could use the data that this study attains would be organizations like chambers of commerce in areas with golf courses and golf tourists.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: JDILLON FINAL CAPSTONE.docx
Authors: John Dillon

Sports Tournaments: A Study of the Economic Impact on Hotels in Small Communities

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 21:58
Abstract: Sports tourism is an emerging tourism niche market recognized as having the capacity to draw visitors to a city or region. What is not known is whether or not this is a trend for small communities. The purpose of this qualitative exploratory study is to seek understanding of the unknown phenomenon of small scale tournament sports tourism events and their effect on hotels in small communities. Through surveys, data will be collected, analyzed, and coded under different categories of economic impact on hotels including average daily rate, revenue per available room, and additional costs incurred when hosting guests associated with sports tournaments. This study will be significant for hotels in small communities looking to host participants and observers of tournament sports tourism events.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Emily O'Hara

Rising to the Top: A study of upscale properties and the attributes they value in potential employees

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 22:07
Abstract: In upscale, luxury based, hotel properties customer service is essential. Properties require new hires to participate in management training programs. Specific knowledge, skills and abilities are essential to gain entry into these programs. This descriptive study seeks to discover how upscale management training programs rank these attributes in potential employees. This study will use a web-based survey instrument. Data will be analyzed in aggregate to identify common requirements. This study may be valuable to baccalaureate hospitality programs and students interested in identifying the value upscale properties place on knowledge, skills and abilities of potential employees.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: DEMEYER FINAL CAPSTONE.docx
Authors: Mitchell DeMeyer

Little People And Hotel Experiences

Fri, 08/10/2012 - 17:35
Abstract: Little people, medically known as dwarfs, are on average 4 feet 10 inches tall or less. This presents a unique set of circumstances when staying in hotels. The purpose of this quantitative study is to determine what the actual hotel experiences of LPs are compared to what they would like them to be. This study will be conducted through the use of surveys. Survey monkey will used to gather responses. An email will be sent to LPs in Region 2 of Little People of America and through Facebook contacts. The results of this study could be used by hotel properties that wish to make their accommodations more accessible for a wider range of people.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Edith Wolocki

Farm to School: Is It Cost Effective?

Fri, 08/10/2012 - 20:24
Abstract: While working within the confines of a school budget, small, rural, K-12 schools in upstate NY need to feed children healthy, nutritious meals everyday to help them learn and grow. The purpose of this study is to determine how and to what extent procuring fresh fruits and vegetables from local farms or local distributor is a cost effective approach for these schools. This quantitative designed study is being conducted by comparing costs associated with purchasing fresh produce from farms and local distributors. How does a farm to school cooperative differ from local distributors in terms of cost effectiveness in procuring produce for these schools? Data will be collected from farmers and school food service directors via interviews and questionnaires. Questionnaires will be emailed to select school food service directors and farmers, including telephone interviews. Data will be analyzed through a coding method which will help schools determine what farms and distributors can offer to them most cost effectively. Information gathered will help school food service directors responsible for the procurement of the produce to make informed decisions as to what means best fits their spending budget.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Farm to School Capstone
Authors: Linda Snyder

Housekeeping Outsourcing

Mon, 08/13/2012 - 15:03
Abstract: Housekeeping is essential to an efficient and effective hotel’s operations. There is not one department in a hotel or lodging enterprise that can exist without housekeeping service. The housekeeping department is usually the largest in the hotel, and it also holds the highest percentage for turnover. Traditionally because the housekeeping department has the greatest staffing numbers and payroll costs, it usually is the first area scrutinized in terms of profit margins. There are different ways that a company can hire their staff and as a hotel manager you have the opportunity to hire hourly employees within the company, or to hire from an outside agency. The purpose of this study was to explore the financial aspects of outsourcing and whether or not it is financially more effective to hire hourly employees or to hire from an outside agency. The outcome of this study can be used by hospitality properties seeking to help cut costs and save on labor for one of their largest departments within the hotel.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Housekeeping Outsourcing
Authors: Lauren Archambault

Promoting Conservation of Biodiversity in the Adirondack Park Through Understanding and Engaging Stakeholders

Thu, 02/09/2012 - 11:31
Abstract: Anthropogenic disturbance of natural environments has led to the widespread loss of native biodiversity and degradation of ecosystems. It is increasingly recognized that addressing this “biodiversity crisis” entails understanding the societal drivers of unsustainable patterns of use. Conservation psychology is a new discipline that specifically focuses on understanding the linkages between human behavior and action and promoting a healthy and sustainable relationship between humans and nature. In this project, we employed principles of conservation psychology with the goal of improving the efficacy and efficiency of conservation of biodiversity in the Adirondack Park (AP). To meet this goal we employed three specific strategies. The first of these strategies was the use of surveys to assess the values, attitudes, and actions different stakeholders have in regards to conservation of biodiversity in the AP. These surveys were disseminated via both direct mailings and online, and included 30 questions. Our second strategy was to use discourse analysis to create a dictionary of terms and phrases employed in a positive, neutral, and negative light in regard to conservation of biodiversity. This entailed analysis of 30 emic accounts derived from opinion articles written by stakeholders in the AP, as well as analysis of a number of etic accounts drawn from online sources. Our third strategy was to use conservation psychology literature to assess ways in which the presentation of information and peer-dynamics influenced the responses of stakeholders towards conservation of biodiversity. Using the combination of these three strategies, we were able to provide a holistic understanding of how different stakeholders in the AP perceive and act towards biodiversity conservation; identify language that can be used to illicit a more positive response from these stakeholders; and identify specific tools based on principles of psychology that can encourage more active and effective engagement in conservation of biodiversity by different stakeholders. Our research findings will allow groups focusing on promoting conservation of biodiversity in the AP to be more effective and efficient in their work in the future.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Forestry, Natural Resources Management and Policy, Recreations, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism
Year: 2011
Authors: Christopher Critelli, John Ghanime, Derek Johnson, Samantha Lambert, Justin Luyk, Matthew Parker, Robert Vite, Heather Mason, Jesse Warner, Ethan Lennox, Sarah Robbiano, David Mathis, David A. Patrick

Removal of Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii) in a Hardwood Forest in Northwest Connecticut

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 09:57
Abstract: Japanese barberry is an invasive shrub that has overtaken and invaded the forest land of New England. Once established, Japanese barberry grows into dense populations that affect forest regeneration, and availability of different nutrients in the soil. This study focused on determining the most time efficient way to remove Japanese barberry from an area. The amount of time it took to complete each removal method was compared with how effective each method was. The effectiveness of each method was based upon how many stems were removed, and how many stems sprouted after a treatment occurred. Four methods were used which included; root severing, cutting stems, burning stems and a herbicide foliar application. It was found that digging stems took a large amount of time, while stem cutting and burning took a moderate amount of time, and the use of herbicide took a small amount of time. It was found that root severing was the least effective method, producing a high amount of new stems and taking the longest time. Herbicide treatment of stems was the most effective method, producing no new stems after treatment and taking a short amount of time to complete. Out of all the methods, two methods had equal expenses. This study has determined the most efficient and least effective way to remove Japanese barberry from a typical New England hardwood stand.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2011
File Attachments: Capstone Paper.docx
Authors: Douglas Palmer

Effects of Forest Cover Type on Carbon Sequestration Rates

Mon, 12/05/2011 - 14:42
Abstract: Climate change and mitigation of climate change are common dilemmas faced by the majority of people within the United States. At the heart of climate mitigation techniques are forestry practices aimed to promote increased carbon sequestration. Forests are effective at sequestering carbon because they act as carbon sinks for the majority of their life. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect that Northeastern forest cover types have on the rate of carbon sequestration. This was done by examining the major forest cover types: northern hardwoods, mixed woods, and conifer forest cover types within Vermont and New Hampshire. This study entailed timber sampling to determine the amount of above ground carbon, increment boring to determine growth rates, soil samples to calculate subsurface carbon, and forest floor samples to determine accumulated carbon in the forest floor. During the study it was found that the conifer stands exhibited the highest rate of carbon sequestration, attributed greatly to the high growth rates and high stocking densities that characterized these stands. In addition, the majority of carbon within all the stands was found to be within the forest soils, which indicates particular attention should be given to this area when managing for carbon sequestration. In conclusion, some suggested management techniques for increasing carbon sequestration rates could include extending the rotation age to capitalize on the entire accelerated growth stage of the trees, and promoting multiple age classes within the stands which would allow for less intensive harvest regimes.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Forestry
Year: 2011
Authors: Charles Dana Hazen