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Capstone Projects

Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) Current Status and Management Plan for New York State

Mon, 04/30/2012 - 18:31
Abstract: Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) were added as a Federally Endangered Species in 1967 and this listing continues, including in New York State. They are one of the most particular of hibernating bats in terms of their biological needs, making them more vulnerable to population declines. Current threats mainly include human disturbance at winter hibernacula, habitat degradation, and White-nose Syndrome. The overall goal is to establish a sustainable population that results in the removal of the Indiana bat from endangered species status in New York State. Courses of action include educating the public, especially recreational cavers, on bat conservation issues. Also, estimating populations at summer roosts and winter hibernacula and developing ways to protect, manage, and regulate these habitats, and gain a better understanding of the fundamental issues related to White-nose Syndrome. An assessment protocol for each course of action is included. A population model simulates population increase once a percentage of individuals are treated for White-nose Syndrome. The results of this model indicate that 75% effectiveness of this treatment will have the greatest effect on increasing population size of Indiana bats. Implementation of the components of this management plan will lead to an eventual recovery of Indiana bat populations.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
Authors: Heather A. Mason

Managing the Effects of Windmills on Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) Populations

Mon, 04/30/2012 - 22:12
Abstract: Windmills are an important alternative to green/renewable energy but at what cost to the birds of the environment? Windmills tend to be in placed in locations that tend to be key flying habitat. This is problematic for golden eagle migration and habitat because they tend to be windy open vast of lands. Unfortunately this is identical to the optimum areas of energy intake. Windmills tend to kill about 1.2 golden eagles per windmill per year alone. The overarching goal of this management plan is to sustain the golden eagle population at carrying capacity. The objectives are to decrease the mortality, increase the birth rate, and continue further research on the golden eagle populations. To enforce the objectives, one must provide actions in which to do so. The actions include maintaining and possible expansion of current regulations, prevent further loss of habitat, regulate the windmills in a multitude of ways, create new habitat, reduce nest disturbance, create suitable nest sites, and ways of continuing the research.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
Authors: Matthew Parker

Red Breasted Geese: An effort to restore and protect a threatened population.

Tue, 05/01/2012 - 11:50
Abstract: Red Breasted Geese or Branta ruficollis, are small, migratory geese that have a known geographic extent that includes the countries of Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Romania, and Bulgaria. With a current approximate population of 37,000 individuals, this species of goose has recently been host to an extreme level of population fluctuation, and as is such has been classified endangered under the ICUN Red List. Red Breasted Geese face numerous threats throughout the year, including the loss of habitat, mortality due to hunting, and mortality due to agriculture based chemical use in the wintering grounds. The goal of this management plan is to increase and stabilize the population of Red Breasted Geese throughout its range, allowing for the de-listing of the species from the IUCN Red-List. This will be achieved through several actions, including the limitation of future harvest during hunting season, the reduction of the use of rodenticides within the agricultural industry near the Black Sea, and the identification of parameters such as adult mortality and required forage intake of breeding Red Breasted Geese.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Jordan Talmage

Management Plan for Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in the Pacific Northwest

Tue, 05/01/2012 - 11:52
Abstract: Marbled murrelets in North America (Brachyramphus marmoratus) are small seabirds found from the Bering Sea to central California (Ralph et al., 1995). They are unique from other Alcids in that they are dependent upon old-growth forests for nesting sites. Within the southern limits of their range in Washington, Oregon, and California, their breeding distribution is determined by the distribution and accessibility of old-growth and late-successional coniferous forests (Ralph et al., 1995). The majority of nests are found within 60 kilometers of the coast on large diameter, moss-covered limbs (Ralph et al., 1995). The primary threats to marbled murrelets are the loss of nesting habitat and habitat fragmentation caused by humans. In the last decade, over a quarter million acres of old-growth forest in the United States was lost due to logging practices (Perry, 1995). Predation of nests, especially by crows and ravens, increases as fragmentation increases from habitat loss (Nelson and Hamer, 1995). Fisheries by-catch and loss of foraging habitat pose as potential threats, increasing adult mortality (Burkett, 1995). Combined, these factors along with other threats are causing the decline and fragmentation of marbled murrelet populations in the Pacific Northwest. Marbled murrelet populations are declining at a rate of 4 to 6 percent annually (Ralph et al., 1995). This significant decline has caused alarm in the Pacific Northwest and globally. In 1991, the state of California listed the species as endangered due to the extreme loss of old-growth forests (Ralph et al., 1995). In February of 1993, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed marbled murrelets as threatened in Washington, Oregon, and California (Ralph et al., 1995). Globally, marbled murrelets are listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List (Ralph et al., 1995). This plan focuses on the most prevalent threats to marbled murrelets presently and to propose actions which may slow or halt the decline of the species in the Pacific Northwest. Specifically, this plan intends to (1) assess and protect the amount of old-growth forest needed to sustain a healthy population of marbled murrelets across Washington, Oregon, and California and (2) to better understand the foraging ecology of marbled murrelets at offshore and inshore sites. These two broad goals represent the imperative need to protect the habitat they depend on and to gain better knowledge of an aspect of the species not well-known, respectively.  
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Chelsea DiAntonio

Management Plan for Common Loons (Gavia immer) in Maine

Tue, 05/01/2012 - 11:55
Abstract: Common loons (Gavia immer) have been a symbol of remote northern lakes and wilderness. Due to their eerie call, beautiful plumage and their habitat choice of remotes lakes coinciding with people’s choice of remote lakes, the common loon is recognized across North America. Due to shooting mortality by humans, habitat loss due to development of lakes, and many others, loon populations declined throughout much of their range in the twentieth century, increasing human awareness and protection of loons. Today, the world population for the common loon is approximately 607,000-635,000. Current threats to their population include lake shore development, increased human lake recreation, and a daunting rise in mercury levels in lakes due to atmospheric distribution by power plants and other anthropogenic causes. Two goals are consisted for common loons: To increase Common Loon populations in Central, Western, and Northern Maine (focus on 56 lakes throughout the state), and to reduce mercury (Hg) levels in Common Loon populations in Maine. Courses of action include monitoring the current population, capture and band common loons on 56 lakes located in Central Maine, Western Maine, and Northern Maine assess and create better nesting habitat for COLO by implementing the use of nest rafts, reducing human traffic (i.e. jet skis, motor boats etc.), and to reduce mercury levels in those lakes through harsher restrictions on power plants. An assessment protocol for each course of action is included. Implementing the components of this management plan will lead to an increased population of common loon populations in central Maine.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Nicole Bellerose

Eastern Mud Turtle (Kinosternon subrubrum) Recovery Plan for Long Island, New York

Tue, 05/01/2012 - 12:05
Abstract: The Eastern Mud Turtle is a rapidly decreasing reptile in the most northeastern part of its range, Long Island, New York. They get their name from the behavior of digging through mud to hibernate. The biggest threats to them are road mortality, nest predation, and loss of habitat. They are slow to mature and therefore depend on high levels of adult survivorship to maintain populations. It takes 5-8 years for a female to mature. Then there is a high risk of the eggs being eaten and the females being hit by cars because they make annual movements to nest. Not many eastern mud turtles have been documented in New York. The goal of this management plan for the eastern mud turtle is to decrease the mortality drastically. Key components include decreasing road mortality, increasing the survival of juveniles, and getting the public more aware and involved. If these are addressed properly, then the eastern mud turtle population is should increase.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Full management plan.docx
Authors: Elena Zito

New York State Goshawk Management

Wed, 05/02/2012 - 01:29
Abstract: Abstract: Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) occupy mature coniferous and deciduous stands one of the few raptors that can actually navigate through dense forests at high rates of speed. Mainly due to timber harvesting of older mature forests they are locked in a constant battle for territory and good food. They prey on small animals like squirrels, grouse, rabbit and even some song birds. With the constant battle for habitat our goals for management will revolve more around the land than the actual bird this would include data on landscape parameters like stand type and age, then by looking at the comparative goshawk population and distribution in those areas a preferred stand type will be selected. After the preferred habitat is determined we look to increase the population of goshawks in the Northern U.S. by ten percent through selective harvesting.
Access: No
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Darrell Vannederynen

Guest Retention due to Value-Added Services within Resorts: A study of the relationship between value added services and guest loyalty in both large and small resorts

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 00:52
Abstract: The resort market is currently an industry of service, rather than simply selling rooms as it was in the past. The concept of a value-added service during a stay in a resort rather than a tangible room is now very important to an individual guest. The purpose of this project is to find out if value-added services make or break the potential for a first time guest to become a return guest. Also, the study shows if these value-added services contribute to customer loyalty. The methods used show the link between a value-added stay and return guests of both small boutique hotels and larger resorts. This data was collected through the form of interviews of front office managers of these types of resorts. The significance of this project will aid hoteliers in both small and larger resorts in deciding the type of service provided by their employees. It will also show them what additional services not already put in place they may want to implement to further guarantee repeat guest business.
Access: No
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: The Author has selected not to publish this complete work.
Authors: Ashley Booton

How are hotels responding to the increase in demand for pure/ hypoallergenic rooms?

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 10:05
Abstract: Americans today have become more and more aware of the germs that are around them. The television advertisements have influenced the idea that there are a lot of germs that people need to be aware of. For example, there is a hazmat advertisement for Hampton Inn that shows a woman being afraid to climb into bed. A housekeeper then comes into the room, in a hazmat suit to take apart the bed stating that Hampton Inn always washes their sheets and duvets, implying that other hotels may not. The purpose of this project is to determine how hotels are responding to the increase in demand for hypoallergenic/pure rooms. The general managers of chain hotels in the northeast will be surveyed. This information will then provide results of how the hotels plan to accommodate these travelers. This will also help determine if the demand for pure rooms will increase the supply of pure rooms. This information can be used by hotel chains to improve their customer expectations of the hotel as well as meet the needs and wants of their travelers.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Capstone Final Paper.docx
Authors: Ashlee Lansing

Wine Applications in Restaurants

Mon, 12/03/2012 - 16:19
Abstract: Research and studies have revealed that wine applications (apps) have an impact on the way wine consumers purchase wine at a restaurant and the way hospitality professionals sell wine at their property. The purpose of this study was to find out how many wine consumers are using wine apps as well as to determine how they are using them. The study then looked at how trend-setting hospitality professionals have adapted their wine selling techniques to assist the wine consumers in their wine selection. The information for this project was obtained through a survey of wine consumers as well as survey of the individual(s) who is in charge of wine sales at the restaurants being surveyed. The results of this study will determine if restaurants should allow and encourage the use of wine apps in their establishment to increase wine sales. Therefore, the results of this study can benefit restaurant properties uncertain if their establishment will be affected by wine apps and are unsure how they should react to the new technology that is offered to wine enthusiasts.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Shelby Stetson