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Capstone Projects

Cornopoly A Study of a Cost Effective and Corn-free Menu

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 11:50
Abstract: In the past ten years the price of corn has quadrupled as the result of the increasing demand for corn. Today, there are wide ranges of items being produced that include corn as an essential ingredient. This project looked into developing ways to help food service establishments to remain cost effective despite the increased price of corn and thus corn derived products. For this project we held a blind taste test meal to find consumer preference. During the meal we supplied questionnaires to collect data on preferences. We found that the price of corn had not reached a high enough point to force a change to non-corn derived products; however, we felt that through statistical forecasting, the price of corn would rise to a point that would not allow restaurants to remain cost effective.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Final Capstone Paper.doc
Authors: Jeffrey Dineen, Matthew Cusimano

Self-Actualization through the use of food

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 12:19
Abstract: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a table consisting of human needs according to necessity; in order to reach a new level, needs of the previous level must be met first. Among the physiological needs located at the bottom of the pyramid, is food. Food can be controlled unlike other biological needs and therefore may play a crucial role in reaching the ultimate goal of self-actualization. The purpose of this capstone is to show how food can go beyond the need of hunger, and bring us to a self-actualizing moment. The surveys will be conducted to gather statistics and opinions of outdoor recreationists and other relevant professionals such as chefs and culinary students. The question that is going to be answered through this capstone is: Is food preparation and consumption an enriching and exciting enough experience to achieve self-actualization? The results should vary between the two populations, but the ultimate prediction is that food will be shown to be a major factor in the achievement of self-actualization. The significance of this study is to reach a new level of understanding about the importance of food to the human body, and show that food can bring that self-actualizing moment without meeting all the other needs of the pyramid beforehand.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Stephanie Curtis

Food Allergies: How might a chef's creative vision be influenced by mandated food allergy legislation?

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 12:57
Abstract: It is estimated that one in twenty-five Americans suffers from a food allergy. As a result Massachusetts State Legislation has set a precedent by creating food allergen training laws to ensure safe food handling practices. This study seeks to determine if and how mandated food allergy legislation might affect a chef’s creative vision. Data concerning food allergies will be collected from: professional chefs and restaurant customers who suffer from a food allergy in the form of a survey. The information will demonstrate if chefs are proactively adapting their restaurant menus before having to be reactive to government mandated regulations. This study will also raise awareness of the prevailing number of food allergies.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: GORSKI FINAL CAPSTONE.docx
Authors: Jeffrey Gorski

Age and its Effects on Taste: Does age play a factor in tea preference?

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 13:23
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine if age was a factor with consumer’s taste buds between the flavors of neutral oolong tea, vegetative green tea, mild white tea and astringent black tea. The method used to retrieve this data was a tea tasting, pared with surveys. The results were compiled in a series of charts. This study was based on age to assist restaurateurs with making a decision of what tea to offer in their establishment. Tea drinkers were surveyed, as well as participated in a tea tasting to decide the answers to these questions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Kathryn Woehrle

"Farm-to-Table"

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 16:51
Abstract: "Farm-to-Table" has proven to be a major trend in the foodservice industry in the past decade. According to restaurant.org the top two trends for 2012 are locally sourced meats and produce. When referring to the literature review on the subject, it is clear that this trend involves numerous aspects. The purpose of this capstone is to come up with a conclusion as to what aspects a younger demographic, namely the 18-25 age group, view as the most important in this growing trend. Information will be gathered from surveys handed out to customers at Eat-N-Meet in Saranac Lake, NY (the local "Farm-to-Table" restaurant) as well as surveys sent to the student population at Paul Smiths College. With the compiled information, a chef or restaurateur involved with the trend in the next couple decades can hope to realize what future customers of this age group will be looking for when dining out at a "Farm-to-Table" establishment.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Ealy Final Capstone.doc
Authors: Justin Ealy

Soulful Dishes - A study of Geechee/Gullah Cooking

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 21:45
Abstract: Every culture has its own cuisine. In the United States, people have emigrated from many different countries. The authenticity and tradition of native food is showcased in various ways. The public has an array of options when it comes to eating different types of food from around the world. Geechee/Gullah (GG) food is not as obtainable. This research is based on the origin and culture of GG people, how their culture is expressed through their cuisine, cooking techniques, and authentic signature dishes. Under the guidance of Chefs Michael Carmel, Kevin Mitchell, and Charlotte and Frank Jenkins, each of whom have experience and knowledge of the subject, the outcome will produce signature dishes that will be available for the public to taste. Exploratory research consisting of interviews and field notes will be the research methods used. Signature dishes and a presentation will provide the general audience with information and awareness of GG cuisine.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Jacqueline Hite

Scent Marketing: Do Scents Make Cents

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 21:51
Abstract: Based on past research and studies to manipulate scents, an experiment will be conducted to determine an influential way for businesses to subliminally attract customers. These customers will be more apt to spend money in the establishment purely from the scent that the business is producing. A “mark” on the mind of the consumers from these aromas will persuade them to open up their mind as well as their wallets. The consistent smell of a universally embraced scent will manipulate the majority of customers: therefore restaurants will have the opportunity to generate more profits. The smell of doughnuts was primarily used as the “universal appeal” for this specific scent to attract more business because the study was being executed in a bakery. Other cases and establishments with billboard or ambient scents (see definition list) might be more applicable for execution. The information collected from this experiment will be used to determine if a subliminal interests can influence customer’s to spend more money.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2012
Authors: Dan Smallridge

A MULTI-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF FOREST HARVESTING FOR WOODY BIOFUELS ON MAMMALIAN COMMUNITIES IN A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST

Fri, 02/01/2013 - 16:19
Abstract: Forest harvesting and subsequent effects on forest structure have been shown to influence mammalian community assemblages and the abundance of individual species, however less attention has been paid to the implications of how harvested timber is used. This is particularly relevant in the Northern Forest, where a considerable portion of the forest harvesting is used to produce biofuels. Biofuels harvesting typically involves the process of whole-tree chipping which may lead to a dramatic reduction in the amount of woody material in the form of slash and coarse woody debris (CWD) left in harvested stands. The goal of our study was to assess the effects of biofuels harvesting on forest structure and subsequent effects on mammalian community structure and abundance. To address this goal, we focused on a ~35 Ha area of partially-harvested northern hardwood forest in the northern Adirondacks, New York. To sample mammals we used a combination of Sherman traps and track plates established at two scales across stands within this area. Our results showed that the response of small mammals to changes in forest structure is both species and scale specific. At the individual trap scale, CWD, slash, and understory cover were important drivers of the occurrence of individual species of small mammals. At the larger “grid” scale, small mammal relative abundance was driven by canopy cover and the density of woody stems. Our results indicate that the current harvesting practices used for biofuel production in the Adirondacks are unlikely to result in declines in abundance of common small mammal species. However, the retention of some slash post-harvest may be beneficial to some species, thus foresters may want to include slash retention when developing silvicultural prescriptions.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Natural Resources Management and Policy
Year: 2012
Authors: Cody Laxton, Alisha Benack, Danielle Ball, Scott Collins, Sam Forlenza, Richard Franke, Stephanie Korzec, Alec Judge, Connor Langevin, Jonathan Vimislik, Elena Zito

Managing for increased productivity and size of an American kestrel (Falco sparverius) population in northern New York

Mon, 05/07/2012 - 12:58
Abstract: American kestrel (Falco sparverius) populations have recently declined across most of the eastern states. As a result, managers and concerned citizens alike have installed nest boxes across large areas to increase productivity. Mr. Mark Manske has run one of these nest box programs in northern New York, across parts of St. Lawrence and Franklin counties, over the past ten years. Through the combination of his research and other long term management plans, the ideal future plan was developed. The focus of the new plan is to boost efficiency of resources, ease of expansion and sustain a steady or increasing population of kestrels. GIS software was used to analyze each nest boxes’ characteristics in order to develop a model that may predict areas of possible high productivity. Surveys and public outreach are emphasized to create a broader supporting base and possibly acquire future partners for land use, volunteers and advertising. The continued monitoring of the northern New York kestrel population will ensure the presence of this vital species for generations to come.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Environmental Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Sauca_Final_Submision.docx
Authors: Tonnie Sauca Jr.

Can black-capped chickadees learn to associate ultraviolet markers with a food source?

Thu, 12/06/2012 - 07:22
Abstract: Food storing birds, like black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), have a higher hippocampal volume than other birds, giving them the ability to hide food in small caches and retrieve them hours later with great precision using physical features of the surrounding area as guides. This capacity for learning spatial information may be able to translate to other forms of learning, such as association. Black-capped chickadees are also able to see in the near ultraviolet range (~370nm), theoretically to allow for more vibrant plumage during the breeding season. I hypothesized that black-capped chickadees have the ability to associate an ultraviolet marker with a food source. If they can, perhaps birds can be 'taught' to go towards or away from things like wind turbines, windows, and other hazardous objects. I tested my hypothesis by counting the number of chickadees that landed on two different feeders, one with an ultraviolet marker and food and one with neither. I found that there was no significant trend, either within or between days, that would indicate that the birds learned (χ2 test and Student’s t-test). As a management use, researchers propose that ultraviolet markers on wind turbines could decrease the collision rate of birds with turbine blades.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Fisheries and Wildlife Science
Year: 2012
File Attachments: Eck_Capstone_Final.doc
Authors: Benjamin Eck