After logging in with the login link in the top right, click here to upload your Capstone

Capstone Projects

Reinvigoration of the Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve: Stakeholder Perceptions

Tue, 05/08/2018 - 15:02
Abstract: The Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve (CABR) was designated by the United Nations in 1989. This reserve spans the entire Adirondack Park, and includes the Lake Champlain Valley in Vermont as well. Biosphere reserves focus on conservation at a global level, and use international knowledge from lessons learned to best benefit each specific biosphere. Although CABR was designated in 1989, it became classified as inactive soon after. In 2016, Brian Houseal, Director of SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry Newcomb Campus, prepared a periodic report to UNESCO on CABRs current status. The goal of this research was to determine the probability of stakeholder support to bring CABR out of inactivity, almost 20 years after it was designated originally. The research performed focused on stakeholders’ awareness and perceptions of the CABR, along with past indications of concerns and resistance among local residents. The research addresses this deficit and identifies and clarifies our representative’s samples perceptions of the designation. The research revealed that land use rights were still the major concern. The research revealed that this was still a concern because there is still a major lack of information on the CABR land classifications/land use rights. Information on CABR was concluded to be one of the largest challenges at this time. This research revealed that 68% of the residents were unaware of CABR until the periodic review was published in 2016, and over 40% of the residents had no idea what CABR was until they received an invite to come to the focus group.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Arboriculture and Landscape Management, Parks and Conservation Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Coolidge Capstone 2018.docx
Authors: Nicholas Coolidge

A Taste of Healthier Baking

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 16:42
Abstract: A Taste of Healthier Baking; We substituted fats and sugars in various recipes with their healthier counterpart.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Megan Rivers, Victoria Sweet

Neurogastronomy

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 12:27
Abstract: Neurogastronomy is the study of how all five senses impact perception of flavor.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Neurogastronomy
Authors: Autumn Florence

Wedding Cake Perceptions and Pricing

Tue, 05/08/2018 - 19:25
Abstract: Overall there have been many different forms of cake, breads and pies that have served as wedding desserts throughout the centuries. It is the meaning behind them and attention that they draw to the bride and the ceremony that is important. Today, for a majority of modern United States weddings, cakes are the most common item used for the main dessert, and focal point of the reception dinner. However, some more alternative weddings will have a tower of cupcakes, a s’mores buffet table at a rustic wedding, or donuts in the shape of a wedding cake for something a little different, it is all dependent on the wishes of the couple. For the purposes of this report, I will be focusing solely on wedding cakes, starting at about the mid 1980’s through current, trendy decorating styles of today. Along with this, I will be talking about some possible trends that will affect what customers are willing to spend in the future, and where the design ideas are headed in the upcoming years.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Baking Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Amanda Relyea

A Comparison of Winter Wildlife Use of Minimally, Moderately and Highly Impacted Shorelines on Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond in the Adirondack Park, NY

Wed, 05/09/2018 - 10:51
Abstract: Continued development and human interference with freshwater shorelines creates a degraded environment and can negatively affect native wildlife along impacted areas. Throughout the Adirondack Park, shorelines have experienced substantial degradation with the development of lakeside summer homes. There tends to be a strong preference for the aesthetics that lakes offer, as well as the numerous recreational opportunities they provide. The increased human use of shorelines and the development of anthropogenic structures has directly resulted in the degradation of shorelines in the Adirondack Park. Likewise, the Paul Smith’s College shoreline along Lower St. Regis Lake has been subjected to degradation throughout the history of the campus. This highly impacted site was selected, alongside minimally and moderately impacted sites in the surrounding areas as representatives for different impact levels. Shoreline degradation includes a decline in the health and presence of natural vegetation, creating a decrease in available food source for native wildlife. The removal of natural vegetation creates a decline in shoreline stability with the removal of root systems, allowing for greater amounts of erosion to occur. Additionally, degradation decreases available canopy cover and increases exposure of wildlife to predation. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in wildlife activity and diversity between three levels of shoreline impacts: minimal, moderate, and high. It was expected that the minimally and moderately impacted shoreline sites would show a greater diversity and abundance of wildlife than highly impacted shorelines. Trail camera data was analyzed at three sites for each treatment on Paul Smith’s College property, along both the Lower St. Regis Lake and Black Pond. Although we detected no significant differences in either activity or diversity across the treatments, there was higher relative activity and diversity in moderately impacted shorelines than minimally or highly impacted. However, wildlife species that are more rare and/or area-sensitive, such as the fisher (Martes pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana), were only detected in the minimally impacted shorelines of Black Pond. A restoration of the highly impacted shoreline to reflect minimally and non-impacted shorelines of the surrounding region would allow for opportunities to improve habitat for native wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: Off
Major: Biology, Ecological Restoration, Environmental Sciences
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Shoreline Restoration
Authors: Tessa White, Caroline Matuck, Kasey Lane, Rosemary Bloodnick, Kyle Pasanen, Annalee Kraai

Effects of Silvicultural Treatments on Wildlife Communities at the Paul Smith's College Forest Research Demonstration Areas

Fri, 05/11/2018 - 16:15
Abstract: Logging has drastically altered North American forest ecosystems for centuries. While extensive studies have been done to determine the impacts of different silvicultural practices on plant communities, minimal research has evaluated the impacts on wildlife communities, particularly in the Adirondack Mountains. Silvicultural practices may significantly impact wildlife communities due to the disturbances it causes, as well as the way it alters the habitat. We monitored winter wildlife communities in the Forest Ecosystem Research Demonstration Area owned by Paul Smith’s College in the Northern Adirondack Park. By analyzing the data collected by trail cameras, tracks and measuring percent browse, we compared the abundance and diversity of wildlife in three silvicultural treatments (i.e., clearcut, group selection, control). We also collected data regarding the physical aspects of the silvicultural treatment plot (i.e. canopy cover and snow depth) to indicate the kind of available habitat. We found that despite there being the highest average relative activity in group selection, there is no significant relationship between average relative activity and harvest treatment type. Using the Shannon-Weiner Diversity Index, we found that the highest diversity was in control/reference. Due to our limited treatment sample size, we did not have conclusive findings in most areas of our study. However, the highest total tracks and relative activity were found in the clearcuts. We suggest that more research be done on this study in order to eventually make forest management plans that properly account for both plant and wildlife species.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Biology, Environmental Sciences, Natural Resources Conservation and Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Jacob Adams, Caitlin De Bellis, Tyler Fisk, Hyla Howe, Mark McHugh, Daniel Sutch

A Taste of Duck

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 09:17
Abstract: A four course meal based around duck.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Taylor Engel

Root Vegetables of the Adirondacks

Sat, 12/09/2017 - 14:52
Abstract: Learn about the nutrient packed superfoods that grow right here!
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
File Attachments: Portfolio , Poster
Authors: Stephen DeSimone

A Community In a Meal

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 20:43
Abstract: Capstone focusing on the impact of sit-down meals. How the culture of sharing meals and making meals at home are changing.
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Rae Bednar

A Taste of Beer

Mon, 05/07/2018 - 09:17
Abstract: This capstone showcases four different brews in each course
Access: Yes
Literary Rights: On
Major: Culinary Arts and Service Management
Year: 2018
Authors: Brenna Zesky